Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker

Jordan hits campaign trail amid bid for Speaker
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Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanSix memorable moments from Ex-Ukraine ambassador Yovanovitch's public testimony Democrats say Trump tweet is 'witness intimidation,' fuels impeachment push Live coverage: Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies in public impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ohio) is taking his Speaker’s bid to the campaign trail this weekend, fundraising for a pair of potentially vulnerable House Republicans more closely aligned with leadership than with his own conservative House Freedom Caucus.

The Chicago-area banquet with Illinois Reps. Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamFeehery: How Republicans can win back the suburbs Ex-GOP Rep. Roskam joins lobbying firm Blue states angry over SALT cap should give fiscal sobriety a try MORE and Randy HultgrenRandall (Randy) Mark HultgrenRepublican challenging freshman Dem rep says he raised 0,000 in 6 days Illinois Dems offer bill to raise SALT deduction cap The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE will give Jordan a chance to showcase why he should lead House Republicans next year as he boosts members outside of his typical conservative circle — and works to save the chamber's GOP majority.

While Jordan may not be an asset in every district, the conservative firebrand can be deployed on the campaign trail to rev up the GOP base in a midterm election where Democrats are expected to have a strong enthusiasm advantage over Republicans.

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Jordan has already swung through Texas this week to assist Chip Roy, who is competing for an open seat in the Lone Star state, and Yvette Herrell, who is vying for an open seat in New Mexico. Another trip to Texas is also in the works.

Jordan plans to make additional campaign stops in Florida, Maryland, North Carolina, Idaho and Iowa in the coming weeks.

And he has already helped fundraise for fellow Freedom Caucus member and vulnerable Rep. Dave Brat of Virginia.

“So yeah, we’re traveling,” Jordan told The Hill.

Whoever replaces retiring Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis Ryan Retirees should say 'no thanks' to Romney's Social Security plan California Governor Newsom and family dress as 2020 Democrats for Halloween DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (R-Wis.) will need to prove that they have the fundraising chops and national profile to carry the GOP conference — and Jordan is facing stiff competition from Ryan’s top two lieutenants on Capitol Hill.

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHarris introduces bill to prevent California wildfires McCarthy says views on impeachment won't change even if Taylor's testimony is confirmed House Republicans call impeachment hearing 'boring,' dismiss Taylor testimony as hearsay MORE (R-Calif.), Ryan’s heir apparent, and Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseLive updates on impeachment: Schiff fires warning at GOP over whistleblower Bottom Line Trump allies assail impeachment on process while House Democrats promise open hearings soon MORE (R-La.), who is waiting in the wings should McCarthy stumble, have both been crisscrossing the country and raising boatloads of cash to help protect potentially endangered members.

But Jordan’s allies argue that he would have no problem raking in similar levels of cash if he were in a high-level leadership position.

Still, they also acknowledge that the Ohio Republican is facing long odds.

“It’s an uphill battle,” Rep. Scott DesJarlais (R-Tenn.), a Freedom Caucus member, told The Hill. “But I think it’s gotten better since he first announced. There are more people that think, ‘Oh, maybe this is possible.’ ”

Jordan, a scrappy Freedom Caucus co-founder, has been crafting his own strategy to secure the Speaker’s gavel and wasting no time since he formally jumped into the race this July.

He worked the phones over the August recess and has been talking directly to lawmakers in the Capitol this month, trying to convince Republicans why he should be their next leader.

His pitch has centered on how he would overhaul the chamber rules and run the House differently if he were in charge, a message designed to appeal to the wide range of lawmakers who are frustrated with how much power is concentrated at the top.

“I talk to members all the time,” Jordan said of his Speaker bid. “I talk about how I think this place should operate differently, the entire process.”

One of the ideas Jordan has floated is allowing the members of a committee to choose their own chairman instead of leaving it up to the Steering Committee, which gives outsize power to the Speaker and his top lieutenant in awarding gavels.

The concept could be especially attractive next year, when there will be nine GOP vacancies at the top of congressional panels.

The idea could also be appealing to the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, which unveiled a package of rule reforms that they want the next Speaker to adopt.

Rep. Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedHillicon Valley: Critics press feds to block Google, Fitbit deal | Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-linked accounts | TikTok looks to join online anti-terrorism effort | Apple pledges .5B to affordable housing Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-affiliated accounts after lawmaker pressure Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg would support delaying Libra | More attorneys general join Facebook probe | Defense chief recuses from 'war cloud' contract | Senate GOP blocks two election security bills | FTC brings case against 'stalking' app developer MORE (R-N.Y.), co-chairman of the caucus, said he has talked to Jordan about his vision for Speaker and gave the Ohio Republican the group’s proposal to overhaul the lower chamber.

Reed is keeping his powder dry in the race, but he said his conversation with Jordan was “positive.”

“I’m looking for rule reform,” Reed told The Hill. “As I told him, and others: I’m open to any candidate who is willing to not just kick the can down the road. Let’s do these rule reforms. We do them up front. And we get it done.”

Jordan believes he has been gaining some ground over the August recess. He pointed to Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersShimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering Bipartisan group reveals agricultural worker immigration bill DC's liaison to rock 'n' roll MORE (Wash.), the No. 4 House Republican, who told a local paper that she is open to supporting Jordan for Speaker, though she isn’t committing to any candidate until after November.

Jordan’s allies took it as an encouraging sign that not all members of the GOP leadership team are on the same page.

And a number of lawmakers, including some outside the Freedom Caucus, told The Hill they have received phone calls from constituents urging them to support Jordan, as well as others backing McCarthy.

Jordan is supported by a number of powerful conservative groups, which have launched an aggressive grass-roots campaign to boost his candidacy and put outside pressure on lawmakers to back it. FreedomWorks also organized a rally for Jordan on the Capitol lawn for later this month.

The groups argue that Jordan, who has become one of President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump opens new line of impeachment attack for Democrats Bloomberg to spend 0M on anti-Trump ads in battleground states New witness claims first-hand account of Trump's push for Ukraine probes MORE’s fiercest defenders on Capitol Hill and has been leading the GOP charge against perceived bias in the Justice Department, is a tough fighter who is willing to stand up for conservative principles — an exciting prospect to the GOP base.

“The way you’re going to win elections is firing up your base. That’s the model,” said Adam Brandon, president of FreedomWorks, who has reached out to members and encouraged them to back Jordan.

Despite the grass-roots support, Jordan is still facing tough political headwinds.

There is an open investigation into whether he and other wrestling coaches at Ohio State University decades ago ignored reports of sexual abuse by a team doctor.  

So far, Jordan has largely weathered the storm, but some Republican strategists worry his public push to lead the conference could turn off independent and female voters in the midterms, especially in the wake of the “Me Too” movement.

“I like Jim Jordan, but it’s not a good time for him to run for Speaker,” said Liz Mair, a GOP strategist. “Really not helpful to the party as a whole.”

And as a bomb-throwing member of the Freedom Caucus, Jordan has burned some bridges in the Republican conference, which is why many GOP lawmakers don’t believe the conservative ideologue can amass the 218 votes needed to become Speaker on the House floor.

They say there are too many rank-and-file Republicans who still hold a grudge against Jordan for forcing out then-Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew BoehnerFrom learning on his feet to policy director Is Congress retrievable? Boehner reveals portrait done by George W. Bush MORE, a fellow Ohio Republican, in 2015 and tormenting his successor, Ryan.

“Negligible,” said Rep. Bill FloresWilliam (Bill) Hose FloresDemocrats push to end confidentiality for oil companies that don't add ethanol The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising The Hill's Morning Report — Trump broadens call for Biden probes MORE (R-Texas) when pressed by The Hill on Jordan’s chances for becoming Speaker.

“I don’t see a path,” agreed Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoFormer GOP Rep. Costello launches lobbying shop Republicans plot comeback in New Jersey K Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers MORE (R-N.J.).