House Judiciary on NY Times article: I intend to subpoena 'McCabe Memos'

House Judiciary on NY Times article: I intend to subpoena 'McCabe Memos'
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The House Judiciary Committee announced on Friday that it intends to subpoena memos from former acting FBI Director Andrew McCabeAndrew George McCabeBrendan Gleeson lands Trump role in CBS miniseries based on Comey memoir Judge tells DOJ to charge McCabe or drop investigation McCabe says he would 'absolutely not' cut a deal with prosecutors MORE detailing reported comments made by Deputy Attorney General Rod Rosenstein in which he proposed secretly taping conversations with President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE and initiating a process to remove the president by invoking the 25th Amendment.

“I intend to subpoena 'McCabe Memos' & all other docs that have been requested & not provided,” the committee tweeted Friday evening from its verified Twitter account.

The New York Times was the first to report Rosenstein’s comments, in which he reportedly sought to recruit Attorney General Jeff SessionsJefferson (Jeff) Beauregard SessionsTrump attacks Sessions: A 'total disaster' and 'an embarrassment to the great state of Alabama' Ocasio-Cortez fires back at Washington Times after story on her 'high-dollar hairdo' Trump's tirades, taunts and threats are damaging our democracy MORE and White House chief of staff John KellyJohn Francis KellyMORE in an effort to invoke the 25th Amendment, which allows a majority vote by a president’s Cabinet to remove the president if they are deemed unfit for office.

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He reportedly made the comments amid the chaos surrounding the White House and Justice Department (DOJ) following Trump's firing of FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyState cites 38 people for violations in Clinton email review GOP cautions Graham against hauling Biden before Senate Graham on Syria: Trump appears 'hell-bent' on repeating Obama's mistakes in Iraq MORE.

“The New York Times’s story is inaccurate and factually incorrect,” Rosenstein said in a statement issued by the Justice Department. “I will not further comment on a story based on anonymous sources who are obviously biased against the department and are advancing their own personal agenda." 

"But let me be clear about this: Based on my personal dealings with the president, there is no basis to invoke the 25th Amendment,” he added. 

Michael Bromwich, an attorney for McCabe, said in a statement, "Andrew McCabe drafted memos to memorialize significant discussions he had with high level officials and preserved them so he would have an accurate, contemporaneous record of those discussions. When he was interviewed by the Special Counsel more than a year ago, he gave all of his memos — classified and unclassified — to the Special Counsel's office. A set of those memos remained at the FBI at the time of his departure in late January 2018. He has no knowledge of how any member of the media obtained those memos." 

The Washington Post, however, reported Friday that the comments were made sarcastically.

The threat to subpoena the “McCabe memos” comes amid an ongoing feud between House Republicans and the DOJ, largely surrounding special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerFox News legal analyst says Trump call with Ukraine leader could be 'more serious' than what Mueller 'dragged up' Lewandowski says Mueller report was 'very clear' in proving 'there was no obstruction,' despite having 'never' read it Fox's Cavuto roasts Trump over criticism of network MORE’s investigation into possible collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia during the 2016 election, and possible obstruction of justice by Trump.

Republicans allege that the probe is biased against the president and the FBI improperly used the so-called Steele dossier, which includes salacious allegations about Trump's ties to Moscow, in applying for the warrant to surveil former Trump campaign aide Carter Page. 

The national security community and DOJ have criticized the calls for declassification, saying that removing key redactions could compromise sources and methods.

The White House announced Monday that the president would instruct the DOJ to declassify a series of documents “at the request of a number of committees of Congress and for reasons of transparency."

However, Trump tweeted Friday morning that he would delay the documents’ release, saying the DOJ “agreed to release them but stated that so doing may have a perceived negative impact on the Russia probe. Also, key Allies’ called to ask not to release. Therefore, the Inspector General has been asked to review these documents on an expedited basis. I believe he will move quickly on this (and hopefully other things which he is looking at). In the end I can always declassify if it proves necessary.”