Scalise: Clinton, Holder comments on civility a 'direct threat to our democracy'

Scalise: Clinton, Holder comments on civility a 'direct threat to our democracy'
© Greg Nash

House Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseOn unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 Texas man with politician hit list, illegally 3D printed rifle sentenced to eight years The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by the American Academy of HIV Medicine - Will there be any last-minute shutdown drama? MORE on Thursday slammed comments made by prominent Democrats, saying they will incite more harassment and violence and calling them "a direct threat to our democracy."

The Louisiana Republican took particular aim at former Secretary of State Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonFBI’s top lawyer believed Hillary Clinton should face charges, but was talked out of it Harris adds key Clinton aide, women of color to 2020 campaign: report Democrats more likely Trump's foil, than to foil Trump MORE, former Attorney General Eric HolderEric Himpton HolderBarack, Michelle Obama expected to refrain from endorsing in 2020 Dem primary: report Ocasio-Cortez to be first guest on new Desus and Mero show Holder says he will make 2020 decision in coming weeks MORE and Rep. Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersPrivate insurance plays a critical part in home mortgage ecosystem On The Money: Lawmakers closing in on border deal | Dems build case for Trump tax returns | Trump, Xi won't meet before trade deadline | Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony Waters in talks with Mnuchin for testimony on lifting of sanctions on Russian firms MORE (D-Calif.) in a Fox News op-ed.

"Despite the continued reports of politically motivated threats or violence, Democratic Party leaders have worked to keep this anger burning and incite even more harassment and violence," Scalise wrote.

Clinton said Tuesday that Democrats cannot be civil towards Republicans, while comments from Holder emerged on Wednesday in which he said Democrats should "kick" Republicans who "go low." Walters, meanwhile, made comments earlier this year encouraging progressives to harass members of the Trump administration.

"Beginning with my own near-death experience at the hands of a deranged shooter who sought to assassinate a baseball field of Republicans, there is a growing list of violent or threatening actions taken against conservatives by Democrats," Scalise, who was seriously wounded when a gunman opened fire at a Republican baseball practice last year, wrote.

"As a survivor of a politically motivated attack, it is tragic to think this is an acceptable state of political discourse in our country," Scalise added.

"I refuse to stand for this and I will continue to call for an end to it. A healthy, strong democracy is not possible if anyone lives in fear of expressing their views."

He also wrote that when Democratic leaders like Holder "call for violence," it is a "direct threat to our democracy." 

"I hope he and others think long and hard about the world they are creating and the impact they are leaving on this country."

Scalise and others on the right have expressed fears that progressives' rhetoric could lead to violence.

"I really worry that someone is going to be killed," Sen. Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump escalates fight with NY Times The 10 GOP senators who may break with Trump on emergency On unilateral executive action, Mitch McConnell was right — in 2014 MORE (R-Ky.) told a local radio station earlier this week.

Some on the left have pushed also back against the most recent comments.

Sen. Heidi HeitkampMary (Heidi) Kathryn HeitkampOvernight Energy: Trump taps ex-oil lobbyist Bernhardt to lead Interior | Bernhardt slams Obama officials for agency's ethics issues | Head of major green group steps down Trump picks ex-oil lobbyist David Bernhardt for Interior secretary On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction MORE (D-N.D.) ripped Clinton's remarks as "ridiculous" on Tuesday, while former first lady Michelle ObamaMichelle LeVaughn Robinson ObamaObama attends UNC-Duke basketball game Obama introduces himself as 'Michelle's husband' at leadership forum The Hill's Morning Report - Can Bernie recapture 2016 magic? MORE (D) pushed back against Holder's version of her slogan "when they go low, we go high."

"Do you want them afraid of their neighbors? Do you want them angry? Do you want them vengeful?" she asked Thursday.