Trump more involved in blocking FBI HQ sale than initially thought: Dems

President TrumpDonald John TrumpJulián Castro: It's time for House Democrats to 'do something' about Trump Warren: Congress is 'complicit' with Trump 'by failing to act' Sanders to join teachers, auto workers striking in Midwest MORE was more directly involved in canceling plans to sell the FBI headquarters in Washington, D.C., than Congress was previously aware of, House Democrats alleged on Thursday. 

They pointed to new documents they say suggest a more expensive proposal to rebuild the headquarters in D.C. instead of relocating to the suburbs was approved during an Oval Office meeting with Trump and General Services Administration (GSA) officials on Jan. 24.

The documents, released by the House Democrats on Thursday, include a picture of the meeting in question and emails that describe the project as what “the president wants” and “what POTUS directed everyone to do.” GSA officials are also quoted in emails saying that they were operating “per the President’s instructions.”

The GSA had long debated whether to demolish the FBI’s aging J. Edgar Hoover Building in D.C. and let a commercial developer come in to build something new, which would allow the FBI to relocate its headquarters to the Washington suburbs.

Critics argue that Trump wanted to prevent commercial developers from building a new property that would compete with the Trump Hotel, which is located across the street from the FBI headquarters. The administration has maintained that it was the FBI’s decision to remain closer to the Department of Justice.

Now, after obtaining the new batch of documents, Democrats say GSA Administrator Emily Murphy misled lawmakers about Trump’s role in the decisionmaking process.

Murphy testified in front of Congress earlier this year about the FBI project, but did not mention meeting with Trump to discuss the FBI headquarters project. An inspector general report released in August called her testimony “incomplete.”

"New documents provided to the Oversight Committee indicate that President Trump met personally with you, the FBI, and White House officials on January 24, 2018, where he was directly involved with the decision to abandon the long-term relocation plan and instead move ahead with the more expensive proposal to construct a new building on the same site, and thereby prevent Trump Hotel competitors from acquiring the land," the letter states.

The letter is signed by Rep. Elijah CummingsElijah Eugene CummingsFederal agency to resume processing some deferred-action requests for migrants Overnight Defense: Trump says he has 'many options' on Iran | Hostage negotiator chosen for national security adviser | Senate Dems block funding bill | Documents show Pentagon spent at least 4K at Trump's Scotland resort Top Oversight Democrat demands immigration brass testify MORE (Md.), the ranking member on the Oversight and Government Reform Committee, and Rep. Peter DeFazioPeter Anthony DeFazioHere are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban To stave off a recession, let's pass a transportation infrastructure bill The Hill's 12:30 Report: Trump issues Taliban warning at Sept. 11 memorial MORE (Ore.), the ranking member on the Transportation and Infrastructure Committee. It is also signed by Reps. Gerry ConnollyGerald (Gerry) Edward ConnollyDemocrat accuses GOP of opposing DC statehood because of 'race and partisanship' History in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week Democrat grills DHS chief over viral image of drowned migrant and child MORE (Va.), Mike QuigleyMichael (Mike) Bruce QuigleyDemocrats to seek ways to compel release of Trump whistleblower complaint Whistleblower complaint based on multiple incidents; watchdog won't disclose info Missouri Republican wins annual craft brewing competition for lawmakers MORE (Ill.),  and Dina TitusAlice (Dina) Costandina TitusMarijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis House Democrats inch toward majority support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment MORE (Nev.), who are all the top Democrats on key subcommittees.

The group is now seeking more documents from GSA on Trump’s role in the project.

Tougher oversight of Trump’s business dealings and exploring his potential conflicts of interest will be a top priority for Democrats if they win back the House.

“Given this background, President Trump should have avoided all interactions or communications relating to the FBI headquarters project to prevent both real and perceived conflicts of interest,” the lawmakers wrote.  “He should not have played any role in a determination that bears directly on his own financial interests with the Trump Hotel. The GSA also should have taken steps to wall off the decision from improper influence.”