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Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president

House Republicans mocked by President TrumpDonald John TrumpBiden says GOP senators have called to congratulate him Biden: Trump attending inauguration is 'of consequence' to the country Biden says family will avoid business conflicts MORE after their midterm losses are pushing back on his rhetoric, arguing that embracing the commander in chief wouldn’t have changed the outcome of their races.

Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanColorado governor says he was not exposed to COVID-19 after Aurora mayor tests positive Colorado mayor says he called protesters 'domestic terrorists' out of 'frustration' Colorado governor directs officials to reexamine death of Elijah McClain in police custody MORE (R-Colo.), one of several Republicans singled out by Trump at a press conference last week, said that while elements of the GOP base love Trump, embracing the president would likely have caused him to lose by an even wider margin.

“I mean, it was obviously disappointing,” Coffman said of Trump’s comments, “but I think he has to know that he's not popular in my district.”

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Coffman lost his reelection race, in a district that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonHillary and Chelsea Clinton to host series based on their book 'Gutsy Women' Democrats see spike in turnout among Asian American, Pacific Islander voters Biden officially announces ex-Obama official Brian Deese as top economic adviser MORE won by 9 points over Trump, by 11 percentage points. He said a Trump visit wouldn’t have helped him and that it wasn’t offered.

“He never offered to come out to the district and I clearly didn’t ask him, but I think it would not have been positive and he knows that,” he said.

Along with Coffman, Trump slammed Reps. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockFormer GOP congressman calls for Biden to receive presidential briefings Former GOP lawmakers call on Trump to accept election results Live coverage: House holds third day of public impeachment hearings MORE (R-Va.), Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members House adjusts format for dinner with new members after criticism Former GOP congressman calls for Biden to receive presidential briefings MORE (R-Fla.), Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamPostcards become unlikely tool in effort to oust Trump Bottom line Lobbying world MORE (R-Ill.), Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenMinnesota Rep. Dean Phillips wins primary Pass USMCA Coalition drops stance on passing USMCA Two swing-district Democrats raise impeachment calls after whistleblower reports MORE (R-Minn.), John FasoJohn James FasoDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Kyle Van De Water wins New York GOP primary to challenge Rep. Antonio Delgado The most expensive congressional races of the last decade MORE (R-N.Y.) and Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveVoters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican Democrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains McAdams concedes to Owens in competitive Utah district MORE (R-Utah) for not embracing him on the campaign trail. All lost their reelection bids.

“You had some that decided to ‘let's stay away, let's stay away,’” he said. “They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.”

He got even more personal with Love, who trails her Democratic challenger by a little more than 1,000 votes in a race that has yet to be called.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost,” he said. “Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

Faso, who was unseated by Rep.-elect Antonio Delgado, said the president’s attacks on members of his party were “ill-advised.”

“I don't think he had the right information. I think I supported the president when I thought he was right and I parted with him when I thought he wasn't,” he said.  

“But you know, the irony is that the Democrats ran the campaign over the last year saying I was a puppet of the president — I mean, neither one of them were correct.”

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceThomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski Gun debate to shape 2020 races GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs MORE (R-N.J.), who lost his race but wasn’t attacked by Trump, agreed the president’s swipes were unnecessary.

“It was inappropriate,” he told The Hill. “They are excellent members. They are friends of mine.”

Curbelo noted that both GOP Senate hopeful Gov. Rick Scott and gubernatorial hopeful former Rep. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantis Florida officials were asked to avoid public statements on coronavirus before election: report The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Dem leaders back smaller COVID-19 relief bill as pandemic escalates DeSantis doubles down on Trump-backed coronavirus approach MORE — both of which are facing recounts in their Florida races — closely aligned themselves with the president yet performed worse in his district than he did.

“What I’ll tell you is the president needs to sharpen his pencil and check his ego,” he told CNN Tuesday. He called Trump “just wrong,” adding the president would’t have helped in his district.

Scott Wong and Melanie Zanona contributed