Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president

House Republicans mocked by President TrumpDonald TrumpYoungkin ad features mother who pushed to have 'Beloved' banned from son's curriculum White House rejects latest Trump claim of executive privilege Democrats say GOP lawmakers implicated in Jan. 6 should be expelled MORE after their midterm losses are pushing back on his rhetoric, arguing that embracing the commander in chief wouldn’t have changed the outcome of their races.

Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanColorado remap plan creates new competitive district Colorado governor says he was not exposed to COVID-19 after Aurora mayor tests positive Colorado mayor says he called protesters 'domestic terrorists' out of 'frustration' MORE (R-Colo.), one of several Republicans singled out by Trump at a press conference last week, said that while elements of the GOP base love Trump, embracing the president would likely have caused him to lose by an even wider margin.

“I mean, it was obviously disappointing,” Coffman said of Trump’s comments, “but I think he has to know that he's not popular in my district.”

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Coffman lost his reelection race, in a district that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonSuper PACs release ad campaign hitting Vance over past comments on Trump I voted for Trump in 2020 — he proved to be the ultimate RINO in 2021 Neera Tanden tapped as White House staff secretary MORE won by 9 points over Trump, by 11 percentage points. He said a Trump visit wouldn’t have helped him and that it wasn’t offered.

“He never offered to come out to the district and I clearly didn’t ask him, but I think it would not have been positive and he knows that,” he said.

Along with Coffman, Trump slammed Reps. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockThe Memo: Never Trumpers sink into gloom as Gonzalez bows out Sunday shows preview: States deal with fallout of Ida; Texas abortion law takes effect The Memo: Trump pours gas on tribalism with Jan. 6 rewrite MORE (R-Va.), Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloA conservative's faith argument for supporting LGBTQ rights Lawmakers laud diversity gains in Congress Nation's fraught politics leads to fear, scars and exits MORE (R-Fla.), Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamBottom line Postcards become unlikely tool in effort to oust Trump Bottom line MORE (R-Ill.), Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenThe Biden 15 percent global tax puts foreign companies ahead of American workers House panel opens probe into Tom Reed over sexual misconduct allegations GOP Rep. Tom Reed accused of sexual misconduct MORE (R-Minn.), John FasoJohn James FasoDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Kyle Van De Water wins New York GOP primary to challenge Rep. Antonio Delgado The most expensive congressional races of the last decade MORE (R-N.Y.) and Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) Love'The View' plans series of conservative women as temporary McCain replacements Black Republican advocates his case for CBC membership Black women look to build upon gains in coming elections MORE (R-Utah) for not embracing him on the campaign trail. All lost their reelection bids.

“You had some that decided to ‘let's stay away, let's stay away,’” he said. “They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.”

He got even more personal with Love, who trails her Democratic challenger by a little more than 1,000 votes in a race that has yet to be called.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost,” he said. “Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

Faso, who was unseated by Rep.-elect Antonio Delgado, said the president’s attacks on members of his party were “ill-advised.”

“I don't think he had the right information. I think I supported the president when I thought he was right and I parted with him when I thought he wasn't,” he said.  

“But you know, the irony is that the Democrats ran the campaign over the last year saying I was a puppet of the president — I mean, neither one of them were correct.”

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceKean Jr. to run against Malinowski: report Thomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski Gun debate to shape 2020 races MORE (R-N.J.), who lost his race but wasn’t attacked by Trump, agreed the president’s swipes were unnecessary.

“It was inappropriate,” he told The Hill. “They are excellent members. They are friends of mine.”

Curbelo noted that both GOP Senate hopeful Gov. Rick Scott and gubernatorial hopeful former Rep. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Democrats inch closer to legislative deal Democrats face growing hurdles in bid to oust DeSantis DeSantis eyes ,000 bonus for unvaccinated police to relocate to Florida MORE — both of which are facing recounts in their Florida races — closely aligned themselves with the president yet performed worse in his district than he did.

“What I’ll tell you is the president needs to sharpen his pencil and check his ego,” he told CNN Tuesday. He called Trump “just wrong,” adding the president would’t have helped in his district.

Scott Wong and Melanie Zanona contributed