Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president

House Republicans mocked by President TrumpDonald John TrumpLincoln Project ad dubs Jared Kushner the 'Secretary of Failure' Pence: Chief Justice Roberts 'has been a disappointment to conservatives' Twitter bans Trump campaign until it deletes tweet with COVID-19 misinformation MORE after their midterm losses are pushing back on his rhetoric, arguing that embracing the commander in chief wouldn’t have changed the outcome of their races.

Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanColorado mayor says he called protesters 'domestic terrorists' out of 'frustration' Colorado governor directs officials to reexamine death of Elijah McClain in police custody Petition demanding justice for Elijah McClain surpasses 2 million signatures MORE (R-Colo.), one of several Republicans singled out by Trump at a press conference last week, said that while elements of the GOP base love Trump, embracing the president would likely have caused him to lose by an even wider margin.

“I mean, it was obviously disappointing,” Coffman said of Trump’s comments, “but I think he has to know that he's not popular in my district.”

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Coffman lost his reelection race, in a district that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonPence: Chief Justice Roberts 'has been a disappointment to conservatives' Top federal official says more details coming on foreign election interference The Hill's Campaign Report: COVID-19 puts conventions in flux  MORE won by 9 points over Trump, by 11 percentage points. He said a Trump visit wouldn’t have helped him and that it wasn’t offered.

“He never offered to come out to the district and I clearly didn’t ask him, but I think it would not have been positive and he knows that,” he said.

Along with Coffman, Trump slammed Reps. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockLive coverage: House holds third day of public impeachment hearings Gun debate raises stakes in battle for Virginia legislature Progressives face steep odds in ousting incumbent Democrats MORE (R-Va.), Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Memo: GOP cringes at new Trump race controversy Trump, GOP go all-in on anti-China strategy Republicans can't exploit the left's climate extremism without a better idea MORE (R-Fla.), Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamBottom line Lobbying world House votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap MORE (R-Ill.), Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenPass USMCA Coalition drops stance on passing USMCA Two swing-district Democrats raise impeachment calls after whistleblower reports Hopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal MORE (R-Minn.), John FasoJohn James FasoDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Kyle Van De Water wins New York GOP primary to challenge Rep. Antonio Delgado The most expensive congressional races of the last decade MORE (R-N.Y.) and Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveFormer NFL player Burgess Owens wins Utah GOP primary The Hill's Campaign Report: The political heavyweights in Tuesday's primary fights The biggest political upsets of the decade MORE (R-Utah) for not embracing him on the campaign trail. All lost their reelection bids.

“You had some that decided to ‘let's stay away, let's stay away,’” he said. “They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.”

He got even more personal with Love, who trails her Democratic challenger by a little more than 1,000 votes in a race that has yet to be called.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost,” he said. “Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

Faso, who was unseated by Rep.-elect Antonio Delgado, said the president’s attacks on members of his party were “ill-advised.”

“I don't think he had the right information. I think I supported the president when I thought he was right and I parted with him when I thought he wasn't,” he said.  

“But you know, the irony is that the Democrats ran the campaign over the last year saying I was a puppet of the president — I mean, neither one of them were correct.”

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceThomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski Gun debate to shape 2020 races GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs MORE (R-N.J.), who lost his race but wasn’t attacked by Trump, agreed the president’s swipes were unnecessary.

“It was inappropriate,” he told The Hill. “They are excellent members. They are friends of mine.”

Curbelo noted that both GOP Senate hopeful Gov. Rick Scott and gubernatorial hopeful former Rep. Ron DeSantisRon DeSantisOn The Money: White House warns there's likely no deal with no agreement by Friday | More generous unemployment benefits lead to better jobs: study | 167K workers added to private payrolls in July DeSantis blames Rick Scott for 'pointless roadblocks' in Florida unemployment system Trump notes GOP governor when asked why he backs mail-in voting in Florida MORE — both of which are facing recounts in their Florida races — closely aligned themselves with the president yet performed worse in his district than he did.

“What I’ll tell you is the president needs to sharpen his pencil and check his ego,” he told CNN Tuesday. He called Trump “just wrong,” adding the president would’t have helped in his district.

Scott Wong and Melanie Zanona contributed