Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president

House Republicans mocked by President TrumpDonald John TrumpREAD: Transcript of James Comey's interview with House Republicans Klobuchar on 2020: ‘I do think you want voices from the Midwest’ Israel boycott fight roils Democrats in year-end spending debate MORE after their midterm losses are pushing back on his rhetoric, arguing that embracing the commander in chief wouldn’t have changed the outcome of their races.

Rep. Mike CoffmanMichael (Mike) Howard CoffmanGardner gets first Dem challenger for 2020 Senate race The 5 most competitive Senate races of 2020 10 things we learned from the midterms MORE (R-Colo.), one of several Republicans singled out by Trump at a press conference last week, said that while elements of the GOP base love Trump, embracing the president would likely have caused him to lose by an even wider margin.

“I mean, it was obviously disappointing,” Coffman said of Trump’s comments, “but I think he has to know that he's not popular in my district.”

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Coffman lost his reelection race, in a district that Democratic presidential nominee Hillary ClintonHillary Diane Rodham ClintonRoger Stone fundraising off promise not to testify against Trump Rivaling chants of 'USA,' 'lock him up' greet Flynn after sentencing hearing The Hill's 12:30 Report — Flynn awaits sentencing | White House signals it wants to avoid shutdown MORE won by 9 points over Trump, by 11 percentage points. He said a Trump visit wouldn’t have helped him and that it wasn’t offered.

“He never offered to come out to the district and I clearly didn’t ask him, but I think it would not have been positive and he knows that,” he said.

Along with Coffman, Trump slammed Reps. Barbara ComstockBarbara Jean ComstockTrump attorney general pick a prolific donor to GOP candidates, groups: report Virginia New Members 2019 Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president MORE (R-Va.), Carlos CurbeloCarlos Luis CurbeloThe Hill's Morning Report — Will Trump strike a deal with Chuck and Nancy? GOP lawmakers call for autopsy on 'historic losses' Bipartisan group of lawmakers propose landmark carbon tax MORE (R-Fla.), Peter Roskam Peter James RoskamIllinois New Members 2019 Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president House GOP returns to Washington after sobering midterm losses MORE (R-Ill.), Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenMinnesota New Members 2019 Defeated Republicans mocked by Trump fire back at president On The Money: Trump says he won't give up tax returns | Likely Dem chair vows to subpoena | Stocks rally on Dem House takeover | Tough midterm for many GOP tax writers MORE (R-Minn.), John FasoJohn James FasoTax law failed to save GOP majority New York New Members 2019 McCarthy defeats Jordan for minority leader in 159-to-43 vote MORE (R-N.Y.) and Mia LoveLudmya (Mia) LoveVoters on both sides chose people who pledged to protect Social Security, Medicare and Medicaid Juan Williams: Nowhere to go for black Republicans WHIP LIST: Pelosi seeks path to 218 MORE (R-Utah) for not embracing him on the campaign trail. All lost their reelection bids.

“You had some that decided to ‘let's stay away, let's stay away,’” he said. “They did very poorly. I’m not sure that I should be happy or sad, but I feel just fine about it.”

He got even more personal with Love, who trails her Democratic challenger by a little more than 1,000 votes in a race that has yet to be called.

“Mia Love gave me no love. And she lost,” he said. “Too bad. Sorry about that, Mia.”

Faso, who was unseated by Rep.-elect Antonio Delgado, said the president’s attacks on members of his party were “ill-advised.”

“I don't think he had the right information. I think I supported the president when I thought he was right and I parted with him when I thought he wasn't,” he said.  

“But you know, the irony is that the Democrats ran the campaign over the last year saying I was a puppet of the president — I mean, neither one of them were correct.”

Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceIncoming Dem lawmaker: Trump 'sympathizes' with leaders 'accused of moral transgressions' On The Money: Why the tax law failed to save the GOP majority | Grassley opts for Finance gavel, setting Graham up for Judiciary | Trump says China eager for trade deal | Facebook reeling after damning NYT report Tax law failed to save GOP majority MORE (R-N.J.), who lost his race but wasn’t attacked by Trump, agreed the president’s swipes were unnecessary.

“It was inappropriate,” he told The Hill. “They are excellent members. They are friends of mine.”

Curbelo noted that both GOP Senate hopeful Gov. Rick Scott and gubernatorial hopeful former Rep. Ron DeSantisRonald Dion DeSantisGoogle's most-searched politician of 2018 is Stacey Abrams Republicans are winning minority voters to make difference in 2020 Gillum to speak at gathering of top Dem donors: report MORE — both of which are facing recounts in their Florida races — closely aligned themselves with the president yet performed worse in his district than he did.

“What I’ll tell you is the president needs to sharpen his pencil and check his ego,” he told CNN Tuesday. He called Trump “just wrong,” adding the president would’t have helped in his district.

Scott Wong and Melanie Zanona contributed