Insurgents seek female challenger to replace Pelosi

The anti-Pelosi insurgents are coalescing around a new strategy in their quest to deny Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSusan Collins asks postmaster general to address delays of 'critically needed mail' Trump says he'd sign bill funding USPS but won't seek changes to help mail voting On The Money: Senate leaves until September without coronavirus relief agreement | Weekly jobless claims fall below 1 million for first time since March | Trump says no Post Office funding means Democrats 'can't have universal mail-in voting' MORE (D-Calif.) the Speaker's gavel: recruit a woman to run against her.

The shift in approach comes as the rebellious group has been faced with a barrage of criticism for trying to take down Pelosi, who became the first female Speaker of the House in 2007, on the heels of an election cycle being dubbed the "Year of the Woman."

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Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceHouse lawmakers to launch probe into DHS excluding NY from Trusted Traveler Program New York lawmaker spotted helping mother duck and ducklings cross busy street Minnesota AG Keith Ellison says racism is a bigger problem than police behavior; 21 states see uptick in cases amid efforts to reopen MORE (D-N.Y.), one Pelosi detractor, hammered the argument that the California Democrat's promotion is the only way to secure female leadership at the very top of the party.

“To those who say that this is an issue of gender, that’s just not true. I’m a woman, and a lot of our new members are women, and they should not be made to feel that they are anti-woman if they don’t want to vote for Nancy Pelosi,” Rice said Wednesday, leaving a closed-door Democratic meeting in the Capitol.

“We have an enormous number of talented women in the caucus — an enormous number.”

Pelosi and her allies have made her gender — and the fact that Democrats won the House largely on the backs of women voters and candidates — a central part of their pitch, arguing they need a strong female voice at the leadership table, especially with President TrumpDonald John TrumpUSPS warns Pennsylvania mail-in ballots may not be delivered in time to be counted Michael Cohen book accuses Trump of corruption, fraud Trump requests mail-in ballot for Florida congressional primary MORE in the White House.

A record-breaking 129 women were elected to serve in Congress next year — up from 112 this current session, according to Quorum, a legislative tracking company. That includes 35 new women in the House.

“You cannot have the four leaders of Congress, the president of the United States — these five people — and not have the voice of women, especially since women were the majority of the voters, the workers and campaigns and now part of this glorious victory,” Pelosi said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

Critics, however, are now trying to combat that narrative and turn the tables on the Pelosi camp by adopting a similar argument centering on the need for a female leader.

"Just look at the amazing number of women who ran and won on a platform of change. People of color ... historic number of women veterans," Rep. Seth MoultonSeth MoultonPortland: The Pentagon should step up or pipe down House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops Overnight Defense: House panel votes to ban Confederate flag on all Pentagon property | DOD report says Russia working to speed US withdrawal from Afghanistan | 'Gang of Eight' to get briefing on bounties Thursday MORE (D-Mass.) told CNN's Chris Cuomo Wednesday night. "We need to answer that call for change, and change in leadership."

Hoping to overcome one of their biggest hurdles in thwarting Pelosi, the insurgent group has been ramping up its efforts to recruit a female challenger, with Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) RyanThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: HHS Secretary Azar says US plans to have tens of millions of vaccine doses this fall; Kremlin allegedly trying to hack vaccine research Democrats see victory in Trump culture war House Democrat calls for 'real adult discussion' on lawmaker pay MORE (D-Ohio) notably telling reporters for the first time Wednesday night that he thinks a woman should replace Pelosi atop the Democratic caucus.

Among female candidates Ryan has floated are Democratic Reps. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosWin by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP QAnon backer Marjorie Taylor Greene wins Georgia GOP runoff Rep. Steve Watkins loses Kansas primary after voter fraud charges MORE (Ill.), Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeHonoring John Lewis's voting rights legacy Teacher-centric is good, but student-centric is better The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Teachers' union President Randi Weingarten calls Trump administration plan to reopen schools 'a train wreck'; US surpasses 3 million COVID-19 cases MORE (Ohio) and Karen BassKaren Ruth BassBlack women are ambitious — that's why we need more in office Bass on filling Harris's Senate spot: 'I'll keep all my options open' Newsom says he has already received a number of pitches for Harris's open Senate seat MORE (Calif.). Ryan said he has urged the latter two to run.

Fudge appeared receptive to the idea on Tuesday, telling reporters she was considering a bid for Speaker.

“I have ruled out nothing,” she said. “I am getting encouraged. That’s what made me start thinking about it.”

Ryan, who ran against Pelosi in 2016 but who has so far declined to mount a challenge this year, hailed Fudge’s leadership expertise, noting that she was a former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus.

He also argued that elevating Bustos, a fellow Midwesterner, to the top spot would provide some much needed representation for the heartland.

“We need to be prepared for what's going to happen when she can't get to 218. And we need to start thinking about who are these women who are capable,” Ryan told reporters.

Bustos, who is backing Pelosi, told The Hill that she has been approached by colleagues encouraging her to run, but said she is only interested in leading the House Democratic campaign arm.

A number of incoming freshman had opposed Pelosi on the campaign trail, and a handful of them are now vowing to oppose her on the House floor. The list includes at least a pair of women: Rep.-elects Abigail Spanberger (Va.) and Mikie Sherrill (N.J.).

While the group of Pelosi critics now claims to have around 20 members who are willing to vote against the longtime Democratic leader on the House floor, it has so far struggled to put up a viable candidate. The rebels say that’s because members are too scared to openly challenge Pelosi, a party heavyweight.

“People are very sensitive to getting into this race right now, under current circumstances,” Ryan said. “But if circumstances change, then there will be a lot of people who are very interested in getting in.”

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Rep. Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaHispanic Caucus asks for Department of Labor meeting on COVID in meatpacking plants The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden builds big lead in battleground Florida Texas Democrat proposes COVID-19 victims' compensation fund MORE (D-Texas), among the most vocal Pelosi critics, said there’s “wide consensus” within the group of insurgents to support a woman for either the No. 1 or No. 2 spot.

“I agree with the premise that — not just because this is the year of the woman — but given the role of women in our nation’s history at this particular point in history, that it’s important to have a woman at the top,” Vela said. “We’re going to make every effort on our end to ensure there’s a woman [seated].”

Vela mentioned three female lawmakers in the insurgent camp — Reps. Rice, Fudge and Linda Sánchez (D-Calif.) — whom he characterized as “well prepared” to tackle a top leadership role.

“But beyond that,” Vela continued, “there are tens of other women in the caucus that I think would do a tremendous job leading us going forward.”