Insurgents seek female challenger to replace Pelosi

The anti-Pelosi insurgents are coalescing around a new strategy in their quest to deny Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiDems plan Monday call on Mueller report: 'Congress will not be silent' Heavily redacted Mueller report leaves major questions unanswered Top Dems: Barr 'deliberately distorted' portions of Mueller report MORE (D-Calif.) the Speaker's gavel: recruit a woman to run against her.

The shift in approach comes as the rebellious group has been faced with a barrage of criticism for trying to take down Pelosi, who became the first female Speaker of the House in 2007, on the heels of an election cycle being dubbed the "Year of the Woman."

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Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceBooker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements New York Rep. Maloney endorses Gillibrand for president Hispanic Dems ask for multi-agency meeting on family separations MORE (D-N.Y.), one Pelosi detractor, hammered the argument that the California Democrat's promotion is the only way to secure female leadership at the very top of the party.

“To those who say that this is an issue of gender, that’s just not true. I’m a woman, and a lot of our new members are women, and they should not be made to feel that they are anti-woman if they don’t want to vote for Nancy Pelosi,” Rice said Wednesday, leaving a closed-door Democratic meeting in the Capitol.

“We have an enormous number of talented women in the caucus — an enormous number.”

Pelosi and her allies have made her gender — and the fact that Democrats won the House largely on the backs of women voters and candidates — a central part of their pitch, arguing they need a strong female voice at the leadership table, especially with President TrumpDonald John TrumpButtigieg on Mueller report: 'Politically, I'm not sure it will change much' Sarah Sanders addresses false statements detailed in Mueller report: 'A slip of the tongue' Trump to visit Japan in May to meet with Abe, new emperor MORE in the White House.

A record-breaking 129 women were elected to serve in Congress next year — up from 112 this current session, according to Quorum, a legislative tracking company. That includes 35 new women in the House.

“You cannot have the four leaders of Congress, the president of the United States — these five people — and not have the voice of women, especially since women were the majority of the voters, the workers and campaigns and now part of this glorious victory,” Pelosi said Sunday on CBS’s “Face the Nation.”

Critics, however, are now trying to combat that narrative and turn the tables on the Pelosi camp by adopting a similar argument centering on the need for a female leader.

"Just look at the amazing number of women who ran and won on a platform of change. People of color ... historic number of women veterans," Rep. Seth MoultonSeth Wilbur MoultonRep. Tim Ryan announces presidential run Conservation happens one animal at a time Liberals infuriated by pro-incumbent House Dem policy MORE (D-Mass.) told CNN's Chris Cuomo Wednesday night. "We need to answer that call for change, and change in leadership."

Hoping to overcome one of their biggest hurdles in thwarting Pelosi, the insurgent group has been ramping up its efforts to recruit a female challenger, with Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanO'Rourke says he is willing to appear on Fox News Klobuchar to appear in Fox News town hall in May Tim Ryan: 'I'm concerned' about rise of socialism in Democratic Party MORE (D-Ohio) notably telling reporters for the first time Wednesday night that he thinks a woman should replace Pelosi atop the Democratic caucus.

Among female candidates Ryan has floated are Democratic Reps. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea Bustos2020 is the Democrats' to lose — and they very well may DCCC opens Texas office to protect House pickups, target vulnerable GOP seats Speaker in waiting? Rapid rise of Hakeem Jeffries fuels talk MORE (Ill.), Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeDems rally behind Omar as Trump escalates attacks Congressional Black Caucus faces tough decision on Harris, Booker Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee to step down as CBC Foundation chair amid lawsuit MORE (Ohio) and Karen BassKaren Ruth BassThe Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday Dems rally behind Omar as Trump escalates attacks Black Caucus warns Trump is putting Omar's life at risk MORE (Calif.). Ryan said he has urged the latter two to run.

Fudge appeared receptive to the idea on Tuesday, telling reporters she was considering a bid for Speaker.

“I have ruled out nothing,” she said. “I am getting encouraged. That’s what made me start thinking about it.”

Ryan, who ran against Pelosi in 2016 but who has so far declined to mount a challenge this year, hailed Fudge’s leadership expertise, noting that she was a former chairwoman of the Congressional Black Caucus.

He also argued that elevating Bustos, a fellow Midwesterner, to the top spot would provide some much needed representation for the heartland.

“We need to be prepared for what's going to happen when she can't get to 218. And we need to start thinking about who are these women who are capable,” Ryan told reporters.

Bustos, who is backing Pelosi, told The Hill that she has been approached by colleagues encouraging her to run, but said she is only interested in leading the House Democratic campaign arm.

A number of incoming freshman had opposed Pelosi on the campaign trail, and a handful of them are now vowing to oppose her on the House floor. The list includes at least a pair of women: Rep.-elects Abigail Spanberger (Va.) and Mikie Sherrill (N.J.).

While the group of Pelosi critics now claims to have around 20 members who are willing to vote against the longtime Democratic leader on the House floor, it has so far struggled to put up a viable candidate. The rebels say that’s because members are too scared to openly challenge Pelosi, a party heavyweight.

“People are very sensitive to getting into this race right now, under current circumstances,” Ryan said. “But if circumstances change, then there will be a lot of people who are very interested in getting in.”

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Rep. Filemon VelaFilemon Bartolome VelaHow Pelosi is punishing some critics while rewarding others New Dem caucus chairman: Some wall is good, but not new wall Border lawmakers press Trump to beef up existing security MORE (D-Texas), among the most vocal Pelosi critics, said there’s “wide consensus” within the group of insurgents to support a woman for either the No. 1 or No. 2 spot.

“I agree with the premise that — not just because this is the year of the woman — but given the role of women in our nation’s history at this particular point in history, that it’s important to have a woman at the top,” Vela said. “We’re going to make every effort on our end to ensure there’s a woman [seated].”

Vela mentioned three female lawmakers in the insurgent camp — Reps. Rice, Fudge and Linda Sánchez (D-Calif.) — whom he characterized as “well prepared” to tackle a top leadership role.

“But beyond that,” Vela continued, “there are tens of other women in the caucus that I think would do a tremendous job leading us going forward.”