Rep. Steve King appeared on podcast that also hosted white nationalists

Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingRep. Steve King appeared on podcast that also hosted white nationalists Dems must wield power against the powerful to win back rural America Iowa governor: Steve King needs to decide if he wants to represent ‘the values of the 4th District’ MORE (R-Iowa) appeared on a podcast that also hosted white nationalists and whose host has argued that some races are less intelligent, CNN's KFILE reported Friday.

King recorded a 45-minute interview with far-right internet personality Stefan Molyneux in September 2017 for the Freedomain Radio podcast.

King called the Congressional Black Caucus "the self-segregating congressional black caucus" and described the group as a "grievance committee" that hijacked Martin Luther King Jr.'s message, according to CNN.

ADVERTISEMENT

The lawmaker, who narrowly won reelection this month, also said that 1960s immigration reform is to blame for NFL players who kneel in protest during the playing of the national anthem.

"Ted Kennedy said, 'this won't change the demographic makeup in America,' and he meant there'll be just as many Irish coming in as there used to be. And of course, that didn't turn out to be true," King said, referring to the deceased senator. "And now we have people kneeling on the sidelines at the pro football games out of disrespect to our flag and what it stands for."

Molyneux had guests including Jared Taylor, the founder and editor of American Renaissance, a white supremacist online magazine, and Peter Brimelow, the creator of the white nationalist website VDare, on his podcast before King, according to CNN.

The Hill has contacted King's office to request comment. 

King has a history of controversial remarks about race and immigration and has been criticized for arguing that America cannot "rebuild [its] civilization with somebody else's babies."

Earlier this month, The Weekly Standard posted audio of the Iowa congressman joking with a constituent about importing "dirt" from Mexico, which appeared to be a derogatory reference to immigrants coming from Mexico and other Central American countries.