Incoming House lawmakers scramble to find their new offices

Newly elected House members scrambled to select their new offices Friday after gathering in the Rayburn House Office Building for a raucous biennial office lottery.

A rowdy crowd cheered for Rep.-elect Ben Cline (R-Va.) after he drew No. 1 in the lottery, giving him first dibs on which office he’ll occupy during the 116th Congress.

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Rep.-elect Mark GreenMark GreenTrump taps Commerce watchdog to be new Interior inspector general Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown Christians at risk of extinction in land where Christmas began MORE (R-Tenn.) was not as fortunate, receiving sympathetic groans when he drew No. 85 — the worst number of the bunch.

The newly elected lawmakers' priorities when selecting their offices varied, with some weighing the size of the office as well as its proximity to the Dunkin Donuts in the Longworth House Office Building.

“My priorities are close to the stairs so you can get in and out quickly,” Rep.-elect Dan McAdams (D-Utah) told The Hill.

The incoming lawmakers studied maps of the different House office buildings, venturing through the halls to tour the rooms being vacated by lawmakers who are either retiring or changing offices.

“I feel OK, I don’t feel great, I don’t terrible, I just feel OK about it,” Rep.-elect Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawO'Rourke says he'd 'absolutely' take down border wall near El Paso if he could Dem Navy veteran files election papers to challenge Crenshaw Key Dem chairwoman opposes bill to automatically avoid shutdowns MORE said with a laugh while talking to reporters. 

The Texas Republican drew No. 59 in the office lottery.

"We’re going to be OK, an office is an office," he said.

"I'm pretty sure we all get an office, so that’s the good news," he quipped.

Some lawmakers were equipped with good-luck charms for the lottery and were spotted dancing in hopes of drawing a low number.

Other good-luck rituals included doing “the floss,” push-ups and rubbing the bald head of Rep.-elect Max RoseMax RoseJudiciary chairman criticizes fellow Democrat for treading in anti-Semitic 'hate' Dem lawmaker on Omar tweet: Be careful about how you discuss sensitive issues GOP leader urges Dems to call out 'anti-Semitic tropes' MORE (D-N.Y.) ahead of picking their chips for the lottery.

“According to the office of Architect of the Capitol: 'Various gyrations and dances are encouraged ... as they are known to result in higher lottery numbers," Rep.-elect Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHillicon Valley: New York says goodbye to Amazon's HQ2 | AOC reacts: 'Anything is possible' | FTC pushes for record Facebook fine | Cyber threats to utilities on the rise Poll finds Democrats oppose certain aspects of border deal Ocasio-Cortez celebrates Amazon canceling New York offices: 'Anything is possible' MORE (D-N.Y) tweeted, including a laughing emoji.

“Folks are rubbing @MaxRose4NY’s head, FaceTiming their kids, and doing the backpack dance for good luck,” she wrote.

Rep.-elect Abigail Spanberger (D-Va.), who drew No. 11, said she looked online in advance but needed to get a better sense of floor plans.

Those whose races have not yet been called have a slight advantage over their potential colleagues. While they don’t get to participate in the event, the winner of the race gets to inherit their predecessor’s office, many of which are larger and in more desirable buildings like Rayburn — the only House office building with a trolly to the Capitol.

While the incoming class enthusiastically scurried the halls in search of their new workspace on Friday, staffers of recently defeated members cleaned out incumbents' offices, filling trash cans in the basement with memorabilia that once hung on the walls.