GOP struggles to win votes for Trump’s $5B wall demand

House Republicans are struggling to come up with a strategy to fulfill President TrumpDonald John TrumpCNN's Don Lemon explains handling of segment after Trump criticism NPR reporter after Pompeo clash: Journalists don't interview government officials to score 'political points' Lawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet MORE’s demand that the lower chamber pass a funding bill that includes $5 billion for his promised border wall. 

 By Wednesday evening, GOP leaders still had not settled on what vehicle they would use to fund the wall or if they would even take a vote this week to do so. Lawmakers in the House have until Dec. 21 to avert a partial government shutdown and are only scheduled to work four of those days. 

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“The president is still interested in trying to get a deal,” Majority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseGOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' The Hill's Morning Report - Trump trial begins with clashes, concessions Cheney's decision not to run for Senate sparks Speaker chatter MORE (R-La.) told The Hill as he emerged from a leadership meeting in Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanThe Hill's Morning Report — Dems detail case to remove Trump for abuse of power Social security emerges as latest flash point in Biden-Sanders tussle Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti rips Sanders for 'inability to actually fight with bad actors' in party MORE’s (R-Wis.) ceremonial office just off the House floor. “He’s been advocating for $5 billion to everybody, not just Republicans. … We support the objective of making sure the president has the money he needs to secure the border.”

In an explosive meeting in the Oval Office a day earlier, Trump told Senate Minority Leader Charles SchumerCharles (Chuck) Ellis SchumerLawyer says Parnas can't attend Senate trial due to ankle bracelet Senate Democrats' super PAC raised million in 2019 As the mental health crisis grows, Puerto Ricans need long-term care MORE (D-N.Y.) and House Minority Leader Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiDemocrats offer mixed reactions to Trump's Mideast peace plan James Taylor to perform at awards ceremony for Ruth Bader Ginsburg this week Trump offers two-state peace plan for Israeli-Palestinian conflict amid skepticism MORE (D-Calif.) that he could easily push $5 billion in wall funding through the House. Pelosi told him the bill would fail spectacularly — and dared him to try.    

Now, Scalise, Ryan and House Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyFox's Wallace: Nadler would pay to have his Clinton impeachment remarks 'expunged from the Earth' McCarthy raises over million in Q4 for House GOP GOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' MORE (R-Calif.) are under enormous pressure to prove their ally in the White House was correct and that Pelosi, the likely incoming Speaker, was wrong.

But it was still unclear late in the day whether Republicans would have enough votes to pass such a package on a party-line vote. Democrats have agreed to back $1.6 billion for border security but have rejected Trump’s $5 billion demand. 

Scalise’s team did not whip a $5 billion wall package Wednesday, but they did a “bed check” to figure out which lawmakers were in the Capitol voting. Since the Nov. 6 midterm election, scores of lawmakers, including those who lost their seats and others who won higher office, have been skipping votes, complicating vote-counting efforts. 

Twenty-four lawmakers missed the vote on the farm bill Wednesday, including 17 Republicans. Among them were Rep. Marsha BlackburnMarsha BlackburnTaylor Swift on publicist's Trump warning before political post: 'F--- that, I don't care' GOP cries boredom in attack on impeachment case Marsha Blackburn shares what book she's reading during Trump Senate trial MORE (R-Tenn.), who won a Senate seat; Rep. Kristi NoemKristi Lynn NoemSouth Dakota governor doubles down on 'meth, we're on it' anti-drug campaign South Dakota drops pipeline protest laws after lawsuit New South Dakota law requiring 'In God We Trust' sign to hang in public schools goes into effect MORE (R-S.D.), who won her governor’s race; and retiring Reps. Bill ShusterWilliam (Bill) Franklin ShusterEx-Rep. Duffy to join lobbying firm BGR Former GOP Rep. Walters joins energy company Ex-GOP Rep. Roskam joins lobbying firm MORE (R-Pa.) and Tom RooneyThomas (Tom) Joseph RooneyHouse Dem calls on lawmakers to 'insulate' election process following Mueller report Hill-HarrisX poll: 76 percent oppose Trump pardoning former campaign aides Dems fear Trump is looking at presidential pardons MORE (R-Fla.).

House GOP appropriators told The Hill that one possible way to fulfill Trump’s vow for a wall was to put forth a short-term stopgap measure known as a continuing resolution that would partially fund the government into January or longer. The appropriators’ package could include the $5 billion for the wall, plus emergency disaster aid for wildfires in the West and other natural disasters.

Sources said any continuing resolution could become a “Christmas tree,” with leaders loading it up with sexual harassment legislation, a renewal of flood insurance and other year-end items.

If House Republicans can muster the votes, it’s possible the Senate would then strip out the $5 billion for the wall and send a continuing resolution back to the House with the pared-down $1.6 billion for border security. 

Democrats have offered a continuing resolution on the Homeland Security spending bill, which would maintain the 2018 funding level of $1.6 billion for border security through the fiscal year that ends Sept. 30. In addition, they would agree to either continuing resolutions or new appropriation bills for the unfunded portions of the government.

Still, Trump remains the wild card. Even if Congress reaches a deal to fund the government, Trump still could veto the bill if it doesn’t include his full $5 billion request for the wall. In fact, during his meeting Tuesday with Pelosi and Schumer, Trump said he would relish the chance to shut down the government.

“I am proud to shut down the government for border security, Chuck,” Trump said in an exchange with Schumer. “People in this country don’t want criminals and people that have lots of problems and drugs pouring into our country.” 

But other senior Republicans conceded the border wall funding would largely be a messaging bill. Even if that package narrowly passes the House, it would be dead on arrival in the Senate, where the GOP needs 60 votes to beat back a Democratic-led filibuster.

“It’s not going anywhere in the Senate. How many hundreds of bills do we have other there? We have to prove yet again we can send a bill over that Schumer won’t provide 60 votes for?” said Rep. Tom ColeThomas (Tom) Jeffrey ColeMcCarthy raises over million in Q4 for House GOP GOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' Democrats don't expect to do 2020 budget MORE (R-Okla.), a senior appropriator and former member of GOP leadership. 

“So I see an exercise in futility. Because then you’re asking people to make tough votes over here for absolutely no good over there,” he said.

Chief Deputy Whip Patrick McHenryPatrick Timothy McHenryMnuchin expresses concerns about proposed taxes on financial trades Fed's top regulator takes heat from both parties NC rep explores Tillis primary challenge MORE (R-N.C.) also said he isn’t sure bringing up legislation that can’t pass the upper chamber is in the House’s best interest from a strategic standpoint, despite expressing confidence the GOP has the votes. He said the Senate should go first.

“It has to be a bipartisan vote,” McHenry said. “I think the best move for the House is to wait and be content to know that this is a Senate-driven process at this point.”

However, members of the House Freedom Caucus, the bloc of conservative rabble-rousers closely aligned with Trump, argue that the House needs to demonstrate it can pass funding for Trump’s wall to give the president better negotiating power and drive Democrats closer to the $5 billion figure.

“The Republicans will vote for it,” Rep. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) told The Hill. “I think they’ve got the votes, if you want the truth.”

Others came close to predicting a partial government shutdown will take place.

The chance of a partial government shutdown next Friday is “more than possible,” said Sen. Richard ShelbyRichard Craig ShelbySenate fails to get deal to speed up fight over impeachment rules Roberts under pressure from both sides in witness fight GOP senator on Trump soliciting foreign interference: 'Those are just statements' MORE (R-Ala.), chairman of the Senate Appropriations Committee.

“I don’t think it’s inevitable. It’s probably more than possible right now,” he told reporters in the Capitol. “It’ll shut down unless we resolve some things.”

Niv Elis contributed.