Inside the Trump-Congress Christmas meltdown

Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungTulsi Gabbard, Don Young introduce marijuana reform bill Alaskan becomes longest serving Republican in House history The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race MORE had had enough.

House lawmakers were in the midst of a marathon voting session on Thursday — a 35-vote slog demanded by a single lawmaker — when the cantankerous Alaska Republican stormed down the aisle of the House floor and began screaming at Rep. Doug CollinsDouglas (Doug) Allen CollinsNearly 40 advocacy groups press lawmakers over NSA call records program Trump: Strzok transcript 'devastating' for FBI, DOJ, CIA House Judiciary Republican releases transcript of ex-FBI agent Strzok's testimony MORE (R-Ga.), who was presiding over the chamber, to close down the vote.

The 85-year-old Young, the dean of the House and longest-serving member, was furious that the vote was left open for Rep. Donald Payne Jr.Donald Milford Payne Jr.New Jersey Dems tell Pentagon not to use military funds for border wall Inside the Trump-Congress Christmas meltdown Chao confirms Trump pushing Ryan to withhold Gateway project funding MORE (D-N.J.), who has been limping around the Capitol on a booted foot.

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“Next time, you bang that gavel,” Young shouted at Collins while shaking his fist. “Until he is in the goddamn well, it don’t count!”

Majority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOvernight Energy: McConnell tees up vote on Green New Deal | Centrist Dems pitch alternative to plan | House Republican likens Green New Deal to genocide | Coca-Cola reveals it uses 3M tons of plastic every year House GOP lawmaker says Green New Deal is like genocide GOP lawmakers: House leaders already jockeying for leadership contests MORE (R-Calif.), standing near Young, gently scolded him, according to lawmakers on the floor: “You’re on TV. That’s not very Dean-like.’ ”

The episode underlined how tempers are at an all-time high in the Capitol as Washington barrels toward its third shutdown of 2018 — just four days before Christmas — in what could be the House GOP’s final act in the majority.

A partial shutdown will occur at midnight Friday unless President TrumpDonald John TrumpWarren: 'White supremacists pose a threat to the United States like any other terrorist group' National Enquirer paid 0,000 for Bezos texts: report Santorum: Trump should 'send emails to a therapist' instead of tweeting MORE and Democrats reach an eleventh-hour deal to fund a handful of government agencies.

Across the Capitol complex this week, lawmakers wore tired, gloomy looks on their faces as they limped to the finish line of the 115th Congress. They wanted to be anywhere but here over the holidays — especially the lame-duck Republicans who lost their reelection bids last month.

One cranky Republican said he wanted to rip the phone away from Trump, who’s been agitating for a Christmas shutdown over demands for his $5 billion border wall.

“The president tweets too much!” the lawmaker said. “I shave [myself] but I don’t tweet about it!”

Earlier Thursday, a closed-door meeting of House Republicans descended into chaos when member after member stood up at the microphone and rejected leadership’s initial plan to quickly take up a funding bill without Trump’s wall.

Another frustrated GOP lawmaker called leadership “stupid” for holding a meeting before a vote on the clean continuing resolution, or CR. They should have just put it on the floor, the lawmaker said.

The unexpected revolt came after lawmakers began receiving hundreds of phone calls from constituents outraged that Republicans were not demanding Trump’s wall before relinquishing control of the House to Democrats next month. Conservative radio and TV hosts Rush Limbaugh and Sean Hannity had personally lobbied Trump to shut the government down if Democrats don’t give him his wall; Trump got the message and vowed to fight.

“Do we succumb to tyranny of talk-radio show hosts? I mean, this is a juvenile place we find ourselves,” retiring Sen. Bob CorkerRobert (Bob) Phillips CorkerTrump keeps tight grip on GOP Brexit and exit: A transatlantic comparison Sasse’s jabs at Trump spark talk of primary challenger MORE (R-Tenn) told reporters on Friday. “The reason we’re here is that we have a couple talk-radio hosts that get the president spun up.”

The House eventually pushed through a funding bill for Trump’s border wall, but the package is dead on arrival in the Senate, dramatically increasing the chances of a Christmastime shutdown that would force members to work through the holidays.

Not every House Republican appeared to be in a hurry to drive down the shutdown path. A trio of lawmakers was spotted at Tortilla Coast, a Capitol Hill Tex-Mex restaurant, after they were called back to the House to vote on the wall package Thursday evening.

“One more round!” a lawmaker called out to their waiter.

“I think they already called the vote,” a reporter interjected.

“They can’t pass this thing without us,” another lawmaker shot back.

Making life even more miserable for his colleagues, Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Trump: I told Republicans to vote for 'transparency' in releasing Mueller report House votes for Mueller report to be made public MORE (R-Ky.) forced roll call votes on more than two dozen bipartisan bills in an unrelated protest over U.S. military support for Saudi Arabia in Yemen — what one northeastern lawmaker referred to as “Massie’s tantrum.”

When Massie stood up to formally request a recorded vote on one of the measures, the Kentucky Republican was met with a round of bipartisan boos from his disgruntled colleagues.

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“It’s been a high drama, high stakes week,” added Rep. Michael McCaulMichael Thomas McCaulThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems aim to end anti-Semitism controversy with vote today Sixteen years later, let's finally heed the call of the 9/11 Commission  GOP lawmakers urge State Dept. to label cartels as terrorist organizations MORE (R-Texas), chairman of the Homeland Security Committee. “Not to mention Massie calling for recorded votes on every suspension bill. Throw that into the chaos.”

If that drama wasn’t enough, the stock market plummeted on news of an interest rate hike and potential government closure. And key defense hawks on Capitol Hill were entirely caught off guard by Defense Secretary James MattisJames Norman MattisNielsen warns US 'not prepared' for foreign cyberattacks US-backed fighters move into last ISIS enclave in eastern Syria: report Joint Chiefs chairman denies report that US is planning to keep 1K troops in Syria MORE’s resignation over policy differences with Trump.

Both Armed Services Committee Chairman Mac ThornberryWilliam (Mac) McClellan ThornberryPentagon: Trump's 'cost plus 50' plan hasn't been discussed with Europe Top Republican says B in Pentagon budget for wall should go to defense Overnight Defense: Trump seeks 0B for defense in 2020 budget | Lawmakers invite NATO chief to address Congress | Top envoy says North Korea denuclearization can't be done 'incrementally' MORE and McCaul, both Texas Republicans, said they got no heads up that Mattis was heading for the exit.

“Holy shit!” exclaimed one Republican on the Armed Services Committee when a reporter shared the news about Mattis. “Don’t quote me on that.”

Democrats took every opportunity to exploit the turmoil unfolding across the aisle. Of all people, Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanHillicon Valley: Google takes heat at privacy hearing | 2020 Dems to debate 'monopoly power' | GOP rips net neutrality bill | Warren throws down gauntlet over big tech | New scrutiny for Trump over AT&T merger 2020 Dem candidates to hold debate on 'monopoly power' Tim Ryan ‘seriously considering’ 2020 bid MORE (D-Ohio), who led a failed coup against expected Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiHillicon Valley: Social media faces scrutiny after New Zealand attacks | YouTube removed 'tens of thousands' of shooting videos | DHS chief warns of state-backed cyber threats | House Dems plan April vote on net neutrality Republican senators who voted against Trump have no excuses Manchin says he won't support LGBTQ protection bill as written MORE (D-Calif.) just weeks earlier, slammed Trump and his party for sowing chaos in government, the economy and national security.   

“This government is in chaos; it’s in a free fall. The market’s in a free fall. The staffing at the White House is in a free fall. The secretary of Defense is gone. We’re pulling out of Syria. What is going on?” Ryan said in a fiery floor speech.

On Friday, as senators who were dragged back to the Capitol to vote on the House-passed package that they knew was doomed to fail, Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP moves to rein in president's emergency powers Republicans up for reelection fear daylight with Trump Overnight Energy: Students around globe demand climate action | EPA bans consumer sales of deadly chemical in paint strippers | Green New Deal set for Senate vote MORE (R-Ky.) held up a button to reporters that he said summed up the mood of the conference: “Senate Cranky Coalition,” it read.

The lawmaker who received the award for the most miserable holiday travel story: Sen. Brian SchatzBrian Emanuel SchatzHillicon Valley: Huawei official asks US to ease restrictions | Facebook loses top execs | Defense officials hit Google over China | Pro-Trump 'safe space' app pulled over security flaw | Senators offer bill on facial recognition technology Senators introduce bill to regulate facial recognition technology Dems introduce bill to protect science research from political interference MORE.

On Thursday, a day after the Senate passed its clean funding package, the Hawaii Democrat hopped on an 11-hour flight out of D.C. to see his wife and kids, thinking his work was done for the year.

But when he landed in beautiful 78-degree weather in Honolulu, Schatz got word that he was needed back in Washington ASAP to help block the House GOP’s wall package. He phoned Democratic Leader Charles Schumer (N.Y.), who told him to catch the next flight back to D.C.

“17 minute visit w the fam,” Schatz tweeted with a photo with his wife and kids in their minivan.

“[My wife] gave me some clean underwear and a T-shirt and I was able to hug the kids, and then turned right around,” Schatz recalled in the Capitol on Friday.