Live coverage: House elects new Speaker as Dems take charge

It’s a huge day in the House, with Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSally Yates: Moral fiber of US being 'shredded by unapologetic racism' Al Green calls for additional security for House members after Trump rally #IStandWithPresTrump trends in response to #IStandWithIlhan MORE (D-Calif.) being elected to a second stint as Speaker and Democrats ready to take control of the body and pass legislation that would end the shutdown. 

ADVERTISEMENT

The day began with the Speaker’s vote and will also include the swearing in of new members.

Votes on the legislation to end the shutdown will come later. The bills have been rejected by President TrumpDonald John TrumpAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' McConnell: Trump 'on to something' with attacks on Dem congresswomen Trump blasts 'corrupt' Puerto Rico's leaders amid political crisis MORE and the Senate, which remains in GOP hands.

Stick with The Hill and bookmark this page for regular updates.

Pelosi sworn in as House Speaker

2:45 p.m.

Pelosi took her oath and was sworn in as the new Speaker of the House after inviting her grandchildren and all the other children in the audience to join her at the front of the chamber.

The oath was administered by the dean of the House, Rep. Don YoungDonald (Don) Edwin YoungGOP scores procedural win by securing more funding to enforce Iran sanctions Ex-GOP lawmakers are face of marijuana blitz Congress: Pass legislation that invests in America's water future MORE (R-Alaska).

Pelosi then swore in the other members of the House.

House elects Pelosi to second Speakership

2 p.m.

Pelosi won the Speaker’s gavel for the second time, marking a historic return to power for the nation’s first female Speaker and ushering in what Democrats promise will be a new era of oversight for Trump and his administration.

Pelosi won the Speakership in a 220-192 vote over Rep. Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump slams House impeachment vote as 'most ridiculous project' House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump White House, Congress inch toward debt, budget deal MORE (R-Calif.), the House minority leader.

Twelve Democrats voted against Pelosi, who worked to crush a Democratic insurgency that initially appeared to threaten her Speakership bid. Three Democrats voted "present."

Six Republicans voted against McCarthy.

Rep. Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanDOJ, Commerce slam House Dems contempt vote as 'political stunt' White House blasts 'shameful and cynical' Barr, Ross contempt vote House votes to hold Trump Cabinet members Barr, Ross in contempt MORE (R-Ohio) received five votes.

— Mike Lillis and Juliegrace Brufke

Incoming New Jersey rep is 15th protest vote against Pelosi

1:47 p.m.

Incoming Rep. Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewThe House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort House Democrats seek to move past rifts with minimum wage bill Hopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal MORE (D-N.J.) voted "present" after originally voting "no," to become the 15th Democratic protest vote against Pelosi as Speaker. Van Drew succeeds Republican Rep. Frank LoBiondoFrank Alo LoBiondoK Street giants scoop up coveted ex-lawmakers The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority LoBiondo launches consulting firm MORE in Congress.

— Naomi Jagoda

Incoming Michigan, Virginia reps are 13th and 14th protest votes against Pelosi

1:42 p.m.

Rep.-elect Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinHouse Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities Hopes dim for passage of Trump trade deal Freshman members form bipartisan task force on election vulnerabilities ahead of 2020 MORE (D-Mich.) and Rep.-elect Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerOvernight Defense: House votes to block Trump arms sales to Saudis, setting up likely veto | US officially kicks Turkey out of F-35 program | Pentagon sending 2,100 more troops to border House votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent MORE (D-Va.) became the 13th and 14th Democratic members to vote against Pelosi.

Slotkin voted "present" and Spanberger became the fourth vote for Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosHouse Democrats' campaign arm raises over million in second quarter Lawmakers join Nats Park fundraiser for DC kids charity Democratic leaders seek balance amid liberal push to go big on immigration MORE (D-Ill.), the incoming chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

— Naomi Jagoda

Oregon rep, New Jersey rep become 11th and 12th Democratic votes against Pelosi

1:40 p.m.

Rep. Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour GOP scores procedural win by securing more funding to enforce Iran sanctions Liberals rip Democratic leaders for writing drug pricing bill in secret MORE (D-Ore.) voted for Rep. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment New York bans discrimination against natural hair Democrats already jockeying for House leadership posts MORE (D-Ohio) for Speaker. Fudge had contemplated a run for Speaker. Fudge cast a vote for Pelosi.

Rep.-elect Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillOvernight Energy: Trump officials gut DC staff for public lands agency to move West | Democrats slam EPA over scientific boards | Deepwater Horizon most litigated environmental issue of decade Democrats, scientists slam Trump administration actions on scientific boards House Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities MORE (D-N.J.) became the third member to vote for Bustos.

— Cristina Marcos

New York rep becomes 10th Dem vote against Pelosi

1: 38 p.m.

Rep.-elect Max RoseMax RoseHouse Dems, Senate GOP build money edge to protect majorities Ocasio-Cortez sued over Twitter blocks The Hill's Morning Report — Harris brings her A game to Miami debate MORE (D-N.Y.) became the second vote for Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthAdvocates push for EpiPens on flights after college student's mid-flight allergic reaction Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker Woman accusing Trump military nominee of sexual assault says she's willing to testify MORE (D-Ill.) to become Speaker.

— Cristina Marcos

Rice becomes ninth Dem vote against Pelosi

1:35 p.m.

Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceDemocrat offers measure to prevent lawmakers from sleeping in their offices Hillicon Valley: Pelosi blasts Facebook for not taking down doctored video | Democrats push election security after Mueller warning | Critics dismiss FCC report on broadband access | Uber to ban passengers with low ratings Lawmakers raise security concerns about China building NYC subway cars MORE (D-N.Y.), a leader of the group of House Democrats who were hoping to oust Pelosi as speaker, voted for Stacey Abrams, who lost her competitive race for Georgia governor in November.

— Naomi Jagoda

Florida rep backs Jordan over McCarthy

Rep. Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryConservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question Pennsylvania state official launches Democratic challenge to GOP rep in district carried by Trump Lawmakers push to block pay raises for members of Congress MORE (R-Pa.) became the fifth Republican vote against McCarthy for Speaker, casting his vote for Jordan.

— Melanie Zanona

Utah rep is eighth Democratic protest vote against Pelosi

1:29 p.m.

Incoming Rep. Ben McAdams (D-Utah) cast his Speaker vote for Rep. Stephanie MurphyStephanie MurphyOmar introduces resolution affirming 'right to participate in boycotts' ahead of possible vote on anti-BDS bill House Democrats seek to move past rifts with minimum wage bill CBC lawmakers rip Justice Democrats for targeting black lawmakers for primaries MORE (D-Fla.), the leader of the moderate Blue Dog Coalition.

— Melanie Zanona

Massie votes Jordan to 'drain the swamp'

1:26 p.m.

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieOvernight Defense: House votes to block Trump arms sales to Saudis, setting up likely veto | US officially kicks Turkey out of F-35 program | Pentagon sending 2,100 more troops to border House votes to block Trump's Saudi arms sale The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE (R-Ky.) became the third Republican to vote against McCarthy. Massie voted for Jordan, saying it was a vote to "drain the swamp."

— Melanie Zanona

Pennsylvania rep is seventh Pelosi protest vote

1:23 p.m.

Rep. Conor Lamb (D-Pa.) voted for Rep. Joe KennedyJoseph (Joe) Patrick KennedyHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment House passes annual intelligence bill Pressley responds to Pelosi dismissal of votes against border bill MORE III (D-Mass.).

Kennedy was seen having a good laugh with the people sitting around him after Lamb's vote. 

— Cristina Marcos

Wisconsin rep becomes sixth protest vote against Pelosi

1:20 p.m.

Rep. Ron KindRonald (Ron) James KindWe should repeal the medical device tax on veterans House panel approves bills on tax extenders, expanding tax credits SECURE Act will give Main Street workers needed security MORE (D-Wis.) voted for civil rights icon Rep. John LewisJohn LewisJohn Lewis rips Trump attacks on minority lawmakers in scathing speech: 'I know racism when I feel it' Omar introduces resolution affirming 'right to participate in boycotts' ahead of possible vote on anti-BDS bill Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent MORE (D-Ga.). Kind was an expected "no" vote on Pelosi after voting against her as Democratic leader in November 2017.

— Cristina Marcos

Jordan backs McCarthy for Speaker

1:15 p.m.

Rep. Jim Jordan (R-Ohio), who received some votes for Speaker, cast his vote for McCarthy.

— Naomi Jagoda 

Pelosi, McCarthy receive first protest votes

1:03 p.m.

Incoming freshman Rep. Anthony Brindisi (N.Y.) became the first Democrat to register a protest vote against Pelosi as Speaker. Brindisi voted for former Vice President Joe BidenJoe Biden2020 Democrats react to 'send her back' chants at Trump rally Can Biden's canceled cancer initiative be salvaged? Biden's health care gaffe shows he's not ready for prime time MORE to serve in the role.

Shortly after Brindisi's vote, Rep. Jim CooperJames (Jim) Hayes Shofner CooperLive coverage: House Oversight examines Trump family separation policy House panel OKs space military branch Overnight Defense: Officials approved sending Saudis nuclear technology after Khashoggi killing | Space Command pick warns of challenges ahead | Lawmakers clash over bill blocking low-yield nukes MORE (D-Tenn.) voted "present," drawing murmurs in the chamber.

Cooper in past years has voted for Colin Powell for Speaker.

Incoming Rep. Jason CrowJason CrowHouse passes bills to boost small business cybersecurity Katherine Clark quietly eyes leadership ascent Senators offer bill to protect small businesses from cyberattacks MORE (Colo.) cast his vote for Duckworth (D-Ill.), a fellow military veteran who also served in the Iraq war.

Incoming Reps. Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamSanford calls for 'overdue conversation' on debt as he mulls Trump challenge The House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort Amash praises Sanford's possible primary challenge to Trump MORE (D-S.C.) and Jared Golden (D-Maine) also broke ranks, voting for Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.), the incoming chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee.

Cunningham will represent a district that President Trump won in 2016.

On the other side of the aisle, most Republicans voted for McCarthy.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashAmash responds to 'Send her back' chants at Trump rally: 'This is how history's worst episodes begin' GOP House campaign chair condemns 'send her back' chants: 'There's no place for that kind of talk' Trump primary challenger Bill Weld responds to rally chants: 'We are in a fight for the soul of the GOP' MORE (R-Mich.), broke ranks to vote for Massie and Reps. Andy Biggs (R-Ariz.) and Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarThe 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran Conservatives ask Barr to lay out Trump's rationale for census question House sends Trump border aid bill after Pelosi caves to pressure from moderates MORE (R-Ariz.) voted for Jordan. 

— Melanie Zanona

Jeffries drops Naughty by Nature reference in nominating Pelosi

12:54 p.m.

House Democratic Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesThe House Democrats who voted to kill impeachment effort House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump Jeffries defends Democratic Caucus tweet slamming Ocasio-Cortez chief of staff MORE (D-N.Y.), who is often discussed as a future Speaker, rose to nominate Pelosi.

To roaring applause from Democrats, Jeffries showcased his knowledge of 1990s hip-hop and said, "Dems are down with NDP," referencing Naughty by Nature's hit song, "Down with OPP."

Nancy Patricia D'Alesandro Pelosi is expected to be elected Speaker later Thursday. 

— Julliegrace Brufke

Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezTop Missouri newspaper condemns GOP's 'shameful silence' on Trump's 'racism' Restaurant in city where Trump rally held donating profits to immigrants Crowd chanting 'welcome home Ilhan' greets Omar at airport MORE, meet Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsLawmakers request documents on DC councilman ethics investigation House Republicans dismissive of Paul Ryan's take on Trump The 27 Republicans who voted with Democrats to block Trump from taking military action against Iran MORE

12:51 p.m.

Progressive firebrand Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez (D-N.Y.) could not be missed on the House floor.

Clad in all white, the congresswoman-elect blew kisses to supporters in the gallery, gave high fives to fellow freshmen and took pictures with fellow Democrats Ann McLane Kuster (N.H.), Barbara LeeBarbara Jean LeeHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Congress, stop ducking war-declaration authority on Iran MORE (Calif.), Sheila Jackson LeeSheila Jackson LeeDemocrats warm to idea of studying reparations Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Schumer throws support behind bill to study reparations MORE (Texas) and Jahana HayesJahana HayesLawmakers put spotlight on youth homelessness The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden looks to rebound after tough week Harris adds endorsement from 7th Congressional Black Caucus member MORE (Conn.).

At one point, Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) wandered across the aisle to shake hands with and say hello to Ocasio-Cortez. The two bomb throwers from opposite ends of the political spectrum smiled and chatted for a bit before Meadows moved on.

— Scott Wong 

Tony Bennett, Tim Gunn among Pelosi guests

12:24 p.m.

Pelosi has invited a star-studded guest list to witness history when she reclaims the Speaker’s gavel on Thursday.

In addition to her children and grandchildren, Pelosi has asked legendary singer Tony Bennett, Grateful Dead drummer Mickey Hart and television personality Tim Gunn to sit in the House gallery during the Speaker’s vote.

Also in attendance will be D.C. Mayor Muriel Bowser, Stephanie Shriock and Ellen Malcolm of EMILY’s List, and the presidents of Georgetown University and Trinity Washington University.

— Melanie Zanona

Pelosi supports hearings on 'Medicare for all'

11:55 a.m.

Pelosi supports holding hearings on "Medicare for all," her spokesman said Thursday, a major step forward for the movement.

Some Democrats had already been talking about holding hearings on the issue and having Pelosi's support could boost that effort.

Pelosi had said last year only that Medicare for all would "have to be evaluated" and is "on the table."

The Washington Post reported that the hearings would be in the Rules Committee and the Budget Committee. 

Notably, that would leave out the main committees with jurisdiction over the issue, Energy and Commerce and Ways and Means. The chairmen of those committees have not given their backing to Medicare for all, while the chairmen of Rules and Budget have.

— Peter Sullivan