Women share photos of traditional Palestinian dresses to celebrate Rashida Tlaib's swearing-in

Women across the country are sharing photos of their traditional Palestinian gowns to celebrate the swearing-in of Rep.-elect Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibOmar says she hopes Netanyahu not reelected Bill Maher, Michael Moore spar over Democrats' strategy for 2020 Young insurgents aren't rushing to Kennedy's side in Markey fight MORE (D-Mich.) 

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress on Thursday, announced last month that she would wear a Palestinian thobe when she is sworn into Congress. 

The hand-embroidered gowns are considered one way Palestinian women can show pride for their heritage. The gowns typically represent the city the person wearing the clothing is from.

Tlaib’s decision to wear a thobe on the House floor sparked a wave of social media users to share photos of themselves in the gowns with the hashtag #TweetYourThobe.

Tlaib, the first Palestinian-American woman elected to Congress, was part of a wave of women who made history in November's midterm elections when she won her race to represent Michigan’s 13th Congressional District.

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She and Rep.-elect  Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarHillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to meet with lawmakers | Big tech defends efforts against online extremism | Trump attends secretive Silicon Valley fundraiser | Omar urges Twitter to take action against Trump tweet Omar asks Twitter what it's doing in response to Trump spreading 'lies that put my life at risk' Trump seeks to expand electoral map with New Mexico rally MORE (D-Minn.), who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first two Muslim women elected to Congress.

Omar will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber. 

Rep.-elect Deb HaalandDebra HaalandOvernight Energy: Trump tweets he's revoking California's tailpipe waiver | Move comes as Trump visits state | California prepares for court fight | Climate activist Greta Thunberg urges lawmakers to listen to scientists Coalition of farmers and ranchers endorses Green New Deal Lawmakers beat reporters in annual spelling bee competition MORE (D-N.M.), one of the first of two Native American women elected to Congress, will also wear traditional attire during her swearing-in, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, will wear a Pueblo dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins.