Women share photos of traditional Palestinian dresses to celebrate Rashida Tlaib's swearing-in

Women across the country are sharing photos of their traditional Palestinian gowns to celebrate the swearing-in of Rep.-elect Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibWill Bernie have to turn on his bros? Rashida Tlaib detained by police during protest against low wages at Detroit airport Trump, like most presidents, takes credit for American workers' effort MORE (D-Mich.) 

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress on Thursday, announced last month that she would wear a Palestinian thobe when she is sworn into Congress. 

The hand-embroidered gowns are considered one way Palestinian women can show pride for their heritage. The gowns typically represent the city the person wearing the clothing is from.

Tlaib’s decision to wear a thobe on the House floor sparked a wave of social media users to share photos of themselves in the gowns with the hashtag #TweetYourThobe.

Tlaib, the first Palestinian-American woman elected to Congress, was part of a wave of women who made history in November's midterm elections when she won her race to represent Michigan’s 13th Congressional District.

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She and Rep.-elect  Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTlaib says she held Omar's hand during 'triggering' moments at Trump's State of the Union speech Key House Democrat says Perez must go: 'He doesn't lead on anything' Democrats tear into Trump's speech: It was a 'MAGA rally' MORE (D-Minn.), who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first two Muslim women elected to Congress.

Omar will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber. 

Rep.-elect Deb HaalandDebra HaalandOvernight Energy: DOJ dropping antitrust probe into automakers | Energy chief unveils coal research initiative | House Dems seek to conserve 30 percent of US lands, oceans House Democrats seek to conserve 30 percent of US lands, oceans by 2030 Stuck in DC for impeachment, senators hold ground in Iowa MORE (D-N.M.), one of the first of two Native American women elected to Congress, will also wear traditional attire during her swearing-in, The New York Times reported Thursday.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, will wear a Pueblo dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins.