The 15 Democrats who voted against Pelosi

Fifteen Democrats voted against returning Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiThe Hill's Morning Report — Washington readies for Mueller end game Dem divisions deepen over approach to climate change 2020 Dems avoid this year's AIPAC conference MORE to the Speaker's chair on Thursday, short of the dozens who originally pledged to oppose her return to power.

The defectors, nearly all freshman lawmakers, didn't all cast their votes for a single alternative candidate.
 
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Three Democrats, Rep. Jim CooperJames (Jim) Hayes Shofner CooperOvernight Defense: Pentagon chief under investigation over Boeing ties | Trump uses visual aids to tout progress against ISIS | Pentagon, Amnesty International spar over civilian drone deaths Acting Pentagon chief says he hasn't 'walked through' Space Force proposal with skeptical Dem chairman Overnight Defense: Judge says Trump can't implement transgender policy | Trump floats admitting Brazil to NATO | Mattis returning to Stanford MORE (Tenn.) and freshman lawmakers Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Lawmakers propose bill to end fed agency's deadly experiments on kittens House GOP secures last-minute change to gun bill MORE (Mich.) and Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewHouse GOP secures last-minute change to gun bill Democrat votes 'no' on Speaker before reversing course The 15 Democrats who voted against Pelosi MORE (N.J.), voted "present," which allowed them to avoid casting a vote in favor of Pelosi without endorsing an actual alternative.
 
Indeed, Pelosi's critics' efforts were hampered last year in large part because they failed to present a candidate who could serve as Speaker instead.
 
But a handful of freshman Democrats in swing districts who promised to oppose Pelosi on the campaign trail followed through on Thursday.
 
Lawmakers can vote for anyone as Speaker, which left defectors room to cast their votes for people outside of Congress. 
 
 
Other defectors voted for current members of Congress.
 
Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthDanish legislator told she's 'not welcome' in Parliament after bringing baby to work Overnight Defense: Pentagon details 8 billion budget request | Officials defend boost for war fund | Armed Services chair aims to 'kill' Trump plan for low-yield nuke Why block citizenship to immigrants who defend America? MORE (D-Ill.), an Iraq War veteran, drew two votes from freshman lawmakers Jason CrowJason CrowDenver Post editorial board says Gardner endorsement was 'mistake' How gun control activists learned from the NRA Gardner gets latest Democratic challenge from former state senator MORE (D-Colo.) and Max RoseMax RoseDem apologizes to constituents for Omar's remarks The importance of moderate voters The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (D-N.Y.).
 
The incoming chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosProgressive demands put new pressures on Democrats House Dems haul in record donations for February The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (Ill.), drew votes from freshman lawmakers Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Congressman blasts air horn at Trump official who said seismic air gun tests don't harm whales House passes second major gun bill MORE (S.C.), Jared Golden (Maine), Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillThe 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority New Jersey Dems tell Pentagon not to use military funds for border wall GOP rep 'disappointed' by the number of Republican women in Congress MORE (N.J.) and Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerCorey Stewart to lead pro-Trump super PAC The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority Why block citizenship to immigrants who defend America? MORE (Va.). 
 
Rep. Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderDon't enact a law that diminishes the incentive for generic companies to challenge patents Overnight Health Care: Medicare for all push worries centrist Dems | New call to fix ObamaCare markets | House panel plans hearing on lowering health costs | CDC worries HIV prevention has 'stalled' House GOP secures last-minute change to gun bill MORE (D-Ore.) voted for Rep. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeCongressional Black Caucus faces tough decision on Harris, Booker Rep. Sheila Jackson Lee to step down as CBC Foundation chair amid lawsuit Reporter says to expect Capitol Hill to take action on North Carolina's 9th District MORE (D-Ohio), a former Congressional Black Caucus chairwoman who contemplated challenging Pelosi for Speaker. But Fudge decided against a bid and ultimately voted for Pelosi on Thursday.
 
Pelosi won the support of many of her critics by agreeing last month to serve no more than four more years as the House Democratic leader. Under the terms of the agreement, Democratic leaders would be limited to three two-year terms. 
 
But each leader could serve another term if they secure support from two-thirds of the Democratic caucus. The deal applies retroactively to include the two terms that Pelosi previously served as Speaker from 2007 through 2011.
 
Below is a full list of the 15 Democratic defectors:
 
Anthony Brindisi (N.Y.): former Vice President Joe Biden
Jim Cooper (Tenn.): "present" 
Jason Crow (Colo.): Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)
Joe Cunningham (S.C.): Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.)
Jared Golden (Maine): Bustos
Kathleen Rice (N.Y.): Democratic Georgia gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams
Max Rose (N.Y.): Duckworth 
Kurt Schrader (Ore.): Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio)
Mikie Sherrill (N.J.): Bustos
Abigail Spanberger (Va.): Bustos
Elissa Slotkin (Mich.) "present"
Jeff Van Drew (N.J.): "present"