The 15 Democrats who voted against Pelosi

Fifteen Democrats voted against returning Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Breaking down the June jobs report | The biggest threats facing the recovery | What will the next stimulus bill include? Military bases should not be renamed, we must move forward in the spirit of reconciliation Pelosi: Trump 'himself is a hoax' MORE to the Speaker's chair on Thursday, short of the dozens who originally pledged to oppose her return to power.

The defectors, nearly all freshman lawmakers, didn't all cast their votes for a single alternative candidate.
 
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Three Democrats, Rep. Jim CooperJim CooperOvernight Defense: Army now willing to rename bases named after Confederates | Dems demand answers on 'unfathomable' nuke testing discussions | Pentagon confirms death of north African al Qaeda leader Top Democrats demand answers on Trump administration's 'unfathomable' consideration of nuclear testing Taylor Swift slams Trump tweet: 'You have the nerve to feign moral superiority before threatening violence?' MORE (Tenn.) and freshman lawmakers Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinWill Congress finally address toxic 'forever chemicals?' Overnight Defense: Trump's move to use military in US sparks backlash | Defense officials take heat | Air Force head calls Floyd's death 'a national tragedy' Democrats blast Trump's use of military against protests MORE (Mich.) and Jeff Van DrewJeff Van DrewDemocrats release bilingual ads on police reform bill Trump campaign launches new fundraising program with House Republicans NY, NJ lawmakers call for more aid to help fight coronavirus MORE (N.J.), voted "present," which allowed them to avoid casting a vote in favor of Pelosi without endorsing an actual alternative.
 
Indeed, Pelosi's critics' efforts were hampered last year in large part because they failed to present a candidate who could serve as Speaker instead.
 
But a handful of freshman Democrats in swing districts who promised to oppose Pelosi on the campaign trail followed through on Thursday.
 
Lawmakers can vote for anyone as Speaker, which left defectors room to cast their votes for people outside of Congress. 
 
Incoming freshman Anthony Brindisi (D-N.Y.) cast a vote for former Vice President Joe BidenJoe BidenTrump hits 'radical left,' news media, China in Independence Day address Kaepernick on July Fourth: 'We reject your celebration of white supremacy' Jaime Harrison seeks to convince Democrats he can take down Lindsey Graham MORE. Rep. Kathleen RiceKathleen Maura RiceNew York lawmaker spotted helping mother duck and ducklings cross busy street Minnesota AG Keith Ellison says racism is a bigger problem than police behavior; 21 states see uptick in cases amid efforts to reopen Hillicon Valley: Tech giants poised to weather coronavirus damage | Record Facebook-FTC deal approved | Bipartisan 5G bill introduced MORE (D-N.Y.), a top Pelosi critic, cast a vote for Stacey Abrams, who lost her competitive race for Georgia governor in November. 
 
Other defectors voted for current members of Congress.
 
Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy DuckworthSunday shows preview: Lawmakers to address alarming spike in coronavirus cases Duckworth to block military confirmations until Esper proves Vindman will be promoted Liberal veterans group urges Biden to name Duckworth VP MORE (D-Ill.), an Iraq War veteran, drew two votes from freshman lawmakers Jason CrowJason CrowCelebrating our freedoms and counting all military votes this November House panel votes to constrain Afghan drawdown, ask for assessment on 'incentives' to attack US troops Overnight Defense: House panel votes to ban Confederate flag on all Pentagon property | DOD report says Russia working to speed US withdrawal from Afghanistan | 'Gang of Eight' to get briefing on bounties Thursday MORE (D-Colo.) and Max RoseMax RoseAlarm grows over Americans stranded in Yemen amid pandemic Moderate House Democrats introduce bill aimed at stopping China from exploiting coronavirus pandemic Republican Nicole Malliotakis wins New York primary to challenge Max Rose MORE (D-N.Y.).
 
The incoming chairwoman of the Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee, Rep. Cheri BustosCheryl (Cheri) Lea BustosKaren Bass's star rises after leading police reform push GOP pulls support from California House candidate over 'unacceptable' social media posts Republican flips House seat in California special election MORE (Ill.), drew votes from freshman lawmakers Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamHarrison goes on the attack against Graham in new South Carolina Senate ad Club for Growth unleashes financial juggernaut for 2020 races Focus shifts to House after Senate passes major public lands bill MORE (S.C.), Jared Golden (Maine), Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillThe Hill's Morning Report - Republicans shift, urge people to wear masks Gun control group rolls out House endorsements Bipartisan Senate group offers new help to state, local governments MORE (N.J.) and Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerTrade groups make lobbying push to be included in small business loan program Virginia GOP to pick House nominee after candidate misses filing deadline Gun control group rolls out House endorsements MORE (Va.). 
 
Rep. Kurt SchraderWalter (Kurt) Kurt SchraderHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes The 14 Democrats who broke with their party on coronavirus relief vote House votes to condemn Trump Medicaid block grant policy MORE (D-Ore.) voted for Rep. Marcia FudgeMarcia Louise FudgeEthics Committee reviewing Rep. Sanford Bishop's campaign spending The Hill's Morning Report - Trump's public standing sags after Floyd protests The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Moniz says U.S. needs energy jobs coalition and Manchin says Congress is pushing Wall Street solutions that don't work for Main Street; Burr to step aside MORE (D-Ohio), a former Congressional Black Caucus chairwoman who contemplated challenging Pelosi for Speaker. But Fudge decided against a bid and ultimately voted for Pelosi on Thursday.
 
Pelosi won the support of many of her critics by agreeing last month to serve no more than four more years as the House Democratic leader. Under the terms of the agreement, Democratic leaders would be limited to three two-year terms. 
 
But each leader could serve another term if they secure support from two-thirds of the Democratic caucus. The deal applies retroactively to include the two terms that Pelosi previously served as Speaker from 2007 through 2011.
 
Below is a full list of the 15 Democratic defectors:
 
Anthony Brindisi (N.Y.): former Vice President Joe Biden
Jim Cooper (Tenn.): "present" 
Jason Crow (Colo.): Sen. Tammy Duckworth (D-Ill.)
Joe Cunningham (S.C.): Rep. Cheri Bustos (D-Ill.)
Jared Golden (Maine): Bustos
Kathleen Rice (N.Y.): Democratic Georgia gubernatorial nominee Stacey Abrams
Max Rose (N.Y.): Duckworth 
Kurt Schrader (Ore.): Rep. Marcia Fudge (D-Ohio)
Mikie Sherrill (N.J.): Bustos
Abigail Spanberger (Va.): Bustos
Elissa Slotkin (Mich.) "present"
Jeff Van Drew (N.J.): "present"