Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandMassie claims media misrepresented Covington Catholic incident We have a long history of disrespecting Native Americans and denying their humanity Student addresses ‘misinformation’ and ‘outright lies’ about incident with Native American man MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsWe have a long history of disrespecting Native Americans and denying their humanity Haaland condemns students' behavior toward Native elder at Indigenous Peoples March Yoder, Messer land on K Street MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibNew progressive sheriffs in town ready to fight for Main Street On The Money: Shutdown Day 27 | Trump fires back at Pelosi by canceling her foreign travel | Dems blast 'petty' move | Trump also cancels delegation to Davos | House votes to disapprove of Trump lifting Russia sanction GOP lawmaker accuses Dems of 'empowering' anti-Semitism MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOcasio-Cortez responds to Aaron Sorkin directing young Dems to ‘stop acting like young people’ GOP lawmaker accuses Dems of 'empowering' anti-Semitism GOP lawmaker pushes to derail Tlaib from leading delegation to West Bank MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.