Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandPressure mounts for national parks closure amid coronavirus We must demand our government decrease emissions from federal public lands Asian Pacific American Caucus vice chair 'shocked and dismayed' GOP leader referred to 'Chinese coronavirus' MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsHere are the lawmakers who have self-quarantined as a precaution Hillicon Valley: US hits Huawei with new charges | Judge orders Pentagon to halt 'war cloud' work amid Amazon challenge | IRS removes guidance on Fortnite game currency Democrats criticize FCC for not taking action against DC station broadcasting Russian disinformation MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibDemocrats eye additional relief checks for coronavirus 20 House Dems call on Trump to issue two-week, nationwide shelter-in-place order Pressley, Tlaib introduce bill providing .5B in emergency grants for the homeless MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTexas man arrested for allegedly threatening Democrats over coronavirus bill Undocumented aliens should stay away as COVID-19 rages in the US The Southern Poverty Law Center and yesterday's wars MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.