Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandRep. Haaland says Trump's 'go back' remarks 'perplexing and wrongheaded' to Native Americans Democrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Snoop Dogg says US women's soccer team deserves same pay as 'sorry ass' men's team MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsHouse Democrats delete tweets attacking each other, pledge to unify Jeffries defends Democratic Caucus tweet slamming Ocasio-Cortez chief of staff Ocasio-Cortez top aide emerges as lightning rod amid Democratic feud MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibCNN, MSNBC said 'racist' more than 4,100 times from July 14-21 Trump says 'Squad' and Dems have 'Trump Derangement Syndrome' over impeachment 2020 RNC host city Charlotte condemns Trump's 'racist and xenophobic' remarks MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarWarren introduces bill to cancel student loan debt for millions Trump says Omar will help him win Minnesota Trump says 'Squad' and Dems have 'Trump Derangement Syndrome' over impeachment MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.