Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandRed dresses displayed around American Indian museum to memorialize missing, murdered native women First Native American Congresswoman presides over House The Hill's Morning Report - Pelosi's challenge: Getting Dems back on same page MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsFirst Native American Congresswoman presides over House Kansas Senate race splits wide open without Pompeo Trump gets dose of new political reality at State of the Union MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibHouse Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts Dems concerned impeachment will make Trump 'appear like a victim,' says pollster Officials dismiss criticism that Trump rhetoric to blame for New Zealand attack MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarTrump on 2020 Dems skipping AIPAC: 'I think they're anti-Jewish' The Hill's Morning Report — Washington readies for Mueller end game 2020 Dems avoid this year's AIPAC conference MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.