Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDeb HaalandBiden taps Obama-era official to lead Fish and Wildlife Service The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Uber - Manchin, Sanders in budget feud; Biden still upbeat Cheney reveals GOP's Banks claimed he was Jan. 6 panel's ranking member MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsPennsylvania Republican becomes latest COVID-19 breakthrough case in Congress Lawmakers laud diversity gains in Congress Biden meets with vulnerable House Democrats with agenda in limbo  MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibClimate advocates turn sights on Wall Street House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Ilhan Omar to Biden: 'Deliver on your promise to cancel student debt' MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDozens of Democrats call for spending bill to pass 'climate test' House progressives call on Biden to end all new fossil fuel permitting Overnight Energy & Environment — Presented by the American Petroleum Institute — Democrats address reports that clean energy program will be axed MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.