Haaland wears traditional Pueblo dress for swearing-in ceremony

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandOvernight Energy: Dems press Interior chief to embrace climate action | Lawmakers at odds on how to regulate chemicals in water | Warren releases climate plan for military Warren releases plan to tackle climate change threats to military House Dem's bill would require ride-hailing companies to cover drivers' Social Security costs MORE (D-N.M.) wore a traditional Pueblo dress on Thursday as she was sworn in as one of the first Native American women in Congress.

Haaland shared photos of her dress, silver and turquoise jewelry and moccasins on Twitter before the ceremony.

“New Mexicans are in the house, the US House that is,” she wrote.

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The Hill has reached out to Haaland’s office for more details about her traditional attire.

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe, is one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress.

Rep.-elect Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsCongressional Women's Softball team releases roster Celebrate Small Business Week: Invest in young female entrepreneurs LGBT lawmakers say nation is ready for gay president MORE (D-Kan.) is a member of the Ho-Chunk Nation.

Haaland was not the only lawmaker who wore traditional clothing to celebrate her heritage while taking her oath of office.

Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibTop House Dem calls to launch impeachment inquiry if McGahn skips testimony Tlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Rep. Tlaib is wrong — Jews were never given 'a safe haven' in Palestine MORE (D-Mich.) wore a traditional Palestinian gown — a thobe — during her swearing-in ceremony.

Tlaib, who is one of the first two Muslim women to join Congress along with Rep.-elect Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarJohn Oliver torches Meghan McCain over Seth Meyers dust-up 'SNL' mocks Jeanine Pirro's support of Trump: 'He is the Michael Jordan of presidents' Omar introduces bill sanctioning Brunei over anti-homosexuality law MORE (D-Minn.), inspired other women to share photos of their thobes on social media.

Omar, who will become the first Somali-American member of Congress, will be the first person to wear a hijab or headscarf on the floor after gaining religious exemption from the 181-year-old rule barring hats in the chamber.