Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown

Several lawmakers have said they will forfeit or donate their paychecks as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. 

Approximately 25 percent of the government shut down on Dec. 22, including the Departments of Homeland Security, Agriculture, Treasury, Commerce, Justice, Interior and State. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have either been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

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While federal workers received their scheduled paychecks last week, thousands could see a delay in getting their next one, scheduled for Jan. 11, if a spending deal isn’t reached on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Here are some of the lawmakers relinquishing their salaries as the shutdown continues:

Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.): Bacon wrote a letter to the House chief administrative officer in December that “Members of Congress should be treated the same as all other federal employees who are impacted by a government shutdown … Fairness and decency dictates that my pay also be withheld.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.): Blumenthal pledged in December to donate his Senate pay to Homes for the Brave, a charity that provides homes to homeless Connecticut veterans.

Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksThe tale of the last bipartisan unicorns Bold leadership is necessary to curb violence against youth Here are the three GOP lawmakers who voted for the Equality Act MORE (R-Ind.): Brooks submitted a letter to the House administrator the day the shutdown began asking her salary be withheld. She said her offices would remain open for constituents. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoe ManchinBiden to meet with CEOs to discuss Build Back Better agenda Hoyer says 'significant' version of Build Back Better will pass this year Gallego went to New York to meet Sinema donors amid talk of primary challenge: report MORE (D-W.Va.): Manchin says he will donate his pay during the shutdown to food banks across West Virginia in an effort to help feed families that rely on food stamps.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R-Fla.): Buchanan stated in December that he would not accept his salary, saying the shutdown was “another sad example of Washington’s dysfunction and inability to compromise.”

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden faces Ukraine decision amid Russia aggression Cheney hits Gingrich for saying Jan. 6 panel members may be jailed The Hill's Morning Report - US warns Kremlin, weighs more troops to Europe MORE (R-Wyo.): Cheney requested her salary be withheld during the shutdown, saying it is not “appropriate” for members of Congress to be paid.

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoDemocrats torn over pushing stolen-election narrative These Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Overnight Energy & Environment — Lummis holds up Biden EPA picks MORE (D-Nev.): Cortez Masto announced hours before the shutdown took hold that she would donate her salary to a Nevada charity.

Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawThis issue will secure a Democratic wipeout in 2022 House Ethics panel dismisses security screening fine issued to GOP lawmaker Juan Williams: The GOP is an anti-America party MORE (R-Texas): "I cannot in good conscience get paid while federal employees’ financial futures hang in the balance because of this partial government shutdown. I’ve asked the Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until we have come to an agreement to adequately fund border security," he tweeted Jan. 10.

Rep. Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralRift grows between Biden and immigration advocates Sixteen Hispanic House Democrats ask EPA for tougher methane rule Democrats mull hardball tactics to leapfrog parliamentarian on immigration MORE (D-N.Y.): Espaillat said in December that he asked for his salary to be withheld during the shutdown in solidarity with the “more than 14,000 New Yorkers who are affected during the #TrumpShutdown.”

Rep. Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansState Democrat group teams up with federal lawmakers to elect down-ballot candidates Democrats on key panel offer bill on solar tax incentive It's now Pelosi's move on bipartisan roads bill MORE (D-Pa.): Evans asked the House administrator Wednesday to withhold his salary, saying he was inspired after he talked with an air traffic control worker and mother affected by the shutdown.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickOn The Money — Support for new COVID-19 relief grows House lawmakers urge Pelosi to bring stock trading ban to the floor Redistricting reform key to achieving the bipartisanship Americans claim to want MORE (R-Pa.): Fitzpatrick said he would forfeit his salary during the shutdown, decrying it as an example of “a failure to lead from both parties” and urging other colleagues to join him. “Let’s send a message to the extreme partisans on both sides: do your job or don’t get paid,” he said in a statement.

Rep. Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteConservative group targets Tester, Sinema, Kelly Montana sees decrease in COVID-19 cases, hospitalizations The GOP's moral postmodernism MORE (R-Mont.): “I strongly believe it is inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid while portions of the federal government remain shut down,” Gianforte wrote in a letter Thursday requesting that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenMeeks leading bipartisan trip to Ukraine amid Russia tensions Trade can improve Jordan's economic burdens made worse by refugees The US is on the sidelines of a historic transformation in the Middle East MORE (R-Tenn.): Green said Friday it was inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid “while hardworking border security agents and other civil servants are furloughed” in a letter to the House administrator

Rep. Kevin HernKevin HernREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee Lawmakers call for small business aid at all levels of government MORE (R-Okla.): Hern, who introduced a bill to hold members’ pay during shutdowns, said Monday he would donate his salary to several veterans’ groups

Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillYour must-read holiday book list from members of Congress How expanded credit data can help tackle inequities Fighting Biden's dangerous reshaping of the Federal Reserve MORE (R-Ark.): Hill said in December he “cannot in good conscience accept pay while federal employees are not receiving theirs” and asked his salary be withheld.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocrats, poised for filibuster defeat, pick at old wounds  Schumer prepares for Senate floor showdown with Manchin, Sinema Dems worry they'll be boxed out without changes to filibuster, voting rules  MORE (D-Hawaii): Hirono announced in December she would donate her salary from the shutdown to food banks across Hawaii and noted that “More than 2,500 federal workers in Hawaii are either furloughed or working without pay during the holidays.” 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenThese Senate seats are up for election in 2022 Senate Republicans call on Biden to lift vaccine mandate for truckers crossing Canadian border Equilibrium/Sustainability — Presented by Southern Company — Native solar startups see business as activism MORE (R-N.D.): Hoeven told Forum News Service that he will donate his salary to the North Dakota National Guard Foundation.

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHillicon Valley — YouTube takes some heat Former GOP rep: Social media companies should be able to suspend Trump, others for 'boldfaced lies' Hillicon Valley — Presented by Ericsson — Tackling the misinformation 'crisis' MORE (R-Texas): Slamming the shutdown as “needless,” Hurd requested in December that his pay be withheld “while other federal employees suffer.”

Rep. David JoyceDavid JoyceLouisiana Democrat running for US Senate smokes marijuana in campaign ad The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by ExxonMobil - Gosar censured as GOP drama heightens The Memo: Gosar censured, but toxic culture grows MORE (R-Ohio): Joyce requested in December that is pay be withheld, saying “If Congress can’t keep the government fully operational, we shouldn’t get paid. It’s that simple.”

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiOversight Dem presses meat processors on rising prices Equilibrium/Sustainability — Fire calls infrastructural integrity into question FDA must address endocrine-disrupting phthalates: House Oversight MORE (D-Ill.): "In solidarity with government employees working for the American people without pay, furloughed workers, and taxpayers denied government services because of this shutdown, I’ve requested that my salary be withheld until the conclusion of the shutdown. I’m donating my pay from the December portion of the shutdown to charity," the lawmaker wrote in a statement released the second week of January.

Rep. Bob Latta (R-Ohio): Latta wrote in a Facebook post last month that he had asked that his pay be withheld during the shutdown, arguing that members of Congress shouldn't get salaries at a time when federal workers were not receiving pay.

Rep. Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaVulnerable House Democrat announces reelection bid on anniversary of Jan. 6 Virginia Supreme Court approves new lines for key swing districts Proposed Virginia maps put rising-star House Democrats at risk MORE (D-Va.): Luria said Thursday she does not believe it is “fair or appropriate” for members of Congress to receive paychecks during a shutdown. She said as a 20-year Navy veteran, she has “firsthand knowledge of how government shutdowns threaten out military preparedness and readiness.” 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.): A co-sponsor of the No Budget, No Pay Act, Maloney requested in December that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsAre the legal walls closing in on Donald Trump? Jan. 6 probe roils Cheney race in Wyoming House has the power to subpoena its members — but does it have the will? MORE (R-N.C.): “As long as our border security agents, air traffic controllers and TSA agents are not paid and their families not supported, I will not accept any salary,” Meadows wrote in December to the House administrator.

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellProposed California maps put incumbents in jeopardy Seven takeaways from California's recall election Opposition to California recall widens in new poll MORE (R-Mich.): “If employees affected by this shutdown do not get paid, neither should members of Congress,” wrote in a Facebook post showing his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.): O’Halleran in December vowed to forfeit his salary if the government shut down and slammed congressional leaders for “allowing partisan gridlock to get in the way of funding our government and preventing a shutdown yet again.”

Rep. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonHouse Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Republican Fort Bend County Sheriff wins Texas House seat 10 bellwether House races to watch on election night MORE (R-Texas): Olson requested Wednesday that his pay be withheld, saying “Federal employees should not be held hostage to dysfunction & inability to solve the problem.”

Rep. Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasNew Hampshire Republicans advance map with substantially redrawn districts Chris Pappas launches reelection bid in New Hampshire Top House Democratic group launches six-figure ad campaign to sell infrastructure package MORE (D-N.H.): Pappas, a former small business owner, asked Thursday for his salary to be withheld. “As someone who has run a small business, I could not imagine receiving a paycheck while any of my employees are working without pay. My first official act as a member of Congress is to reject a paycheck until Congress does its job and the government is re-opened,” Pappas, a freshman congressman, tweeted.

Rep. Max RoseMax RoseMax Rose launches another run for Congress Max Rose preparing for rematch with Nicole Malliotakis: report 'Blue wave' Democrats eye comebacks after losing reelection MORE (D-N.Y.): Rose, another freshman congressman, said he would donate any pay earned during the shutdown. “This shutdown is an insult to all Americans who work their heart out every day b/c unlike Congress they cant afford to act like children,” he tweeted Sunday

Sen. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenOvernight Energy & Environment — Starting from 'scratch' on climate, spending bill Bipartisan lawmakers announce climate adaptation bill Eight senators ask Biden to reverse course on Trump-era solar tariffs MORE (D-Nev.): Rosen said she would donate her salary to state organizations “aimed at helping survivors of sexual and domestic violence.” Authorization for the Violence Against Women Act lapsed with the shutdown.

Rep. Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderProgressives declare victory in spending bill fight Biden shows little progress with Abraham Accords on first anniversary Lawmakers tout improved access to health care via telemedicine MORE (D-Ill.): Noting that he has done the same in previous shutdowns, Schneider said in December he would return his salary to the Treasury Department. Schneider is a co-sponsor of the Hold Congress Accountable Act, which would suspend pay for members of congress during shutdowns. 

Rep. Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillMeeks leading bipartisan trip to Ukraine amid Russia tensions Democrats look back on Jan. 6 with emotion Democrats gain edge from New Jersey Redistricting Commission-approved maps MORE (D-N.J.): A former federal employee herself, Sherrill requested Tuesday that her pay be withheld. “I came here to govern, not engage in partisan politics at the expense of hardworking Americans,” Sherrill, a freshman congresswoman, tweeted.

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinSunday shows preview: US reaffirms support for Ukraine amid threat of Russian invasion Michigan Republicans sue over US House district lines Pandemic pushes teachers unions to center stage ahead of midterms MORE (D-Mich.): Slotkin, who oversaw the furloughs of hundreds of personnel at the Pentagon during a past shutdown, requested Thursday that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Ross SpanoVincent (Ross) Ross SpanoGOP keeps control of Florida House seat held by Rep. Ross Spano 10 bellwether House races to watch on election night The Hill's Morning Report - Jill Biden urges country to embrace her husband MORE (R-Fla.): “I would support legislation forcing members of Congress to forfeit pay during any government shutdown, and I pledge not to take a paycheck until this impasse is resolved,” Spano said in a statement Thursday. 

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikSupreme Court declines GOP challenge against House proxy voting Mask rules spark political games and a nasty environment in the House House GOP leaders vow to end proxy voting despite widespread Republican use MORE (R-N.Y.): Stefanik requested the day the shutdown began that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Van TaylorVan TaylorWHIP LIST: How House Democrats, Republicans say they'll vote on infrastructure bill Shakespeare gets a congressional hearing in this year's 'Will on the Hill' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel MORE (R-Texas): “Members of Congress should not be paid when critical federal employees, including our border patrol agents, are denied their paychecks,” Taylor tweeted Thursday, attaching with his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Michael WaltzMichael WaltzDefense & National Security — Pentagon puts 8,500 troops on high alert House GOP members introduce legislation targeting Russia over Ukraine Photos of the Year MORE (R-Fla.): “I will not accept a paycheck until the men and women providing national security functions are compensated,” Waltz posted on Facebook Friday.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenFiscal conservatives should support postal reform  Five Democrats the left plans to target Arizona Democratic Party executive board censures Sinema MORE (D-Mass.): Warren announced Tuesday she will donate her salary during the shutdown to HIAS, an organization that supports refugees. 

Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonVirginia Supreme Court approves new lines for key swing districts Proposed Virginia maps put rising-star House Democrats at risk The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Rising prices undercut Biden agenda MORE (D-Va.): “Because members of Congress continue to receive their pay during these shutdowns even though our constituents do not, please withhold my pay until an appropriations agreement has been reached and other federal employees begin receiving their pay,” Wexton, a freshman congresswoman wrote in a letter to the House administrator.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthOn the Money — Student borrowers stare down rising prices More than 30 million families to lose child tax credit checks starting this weekend On The Trail: Retirements offer window into House Democratic mood MORE (D-Ky.): A spokesperson confirmed that Yarmuth has donated his post-tax salary every year since he was elected in 2007 and will do so for 2018.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinHochul raises .6 million since launching gubernatorial campaign Members of Congress not running for reelection in 2022 Rudy Giuliani becomes grandfather after son welcomes child MORE (R-N.Y.): “It's crazy to me that Members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not,” Zeldin said in a December statement. “I instructed the House Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until this partial government shutdown ends.”

 

– Updated on Jan. 10 at 3:27 p.m.