Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown

Several lawmakers have said they will forfeit or donate their paychecks as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. 

Approximately 25 percent of the government shut down on Dec. 22, including the Departments of Homeland Security, Agriculture, Treasury, Commerce, Justice, Interior and State. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have either been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

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While federal workers received their scheduled paychecks last week, thousands could see a delay in getting their next one, scheduled for Jan. 11, if a spending deal isn’t reached on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Here are some of the lawmakers relinquishing their salaries as the shutdown continues:

Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.): Bacon wrote a letter to the House chief administrative officer in December that “Members of Congress should be treated the same as all other federal employees who are impacted by a government shutdown … Fairness and decency dictates that my pay also be withheld.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.): Blumenthal pledged in December to donate his Senate pay to Homes for the Brave, a charity that provides homes to homeless Connecticut veterans.

Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksDemocrat Christina Hale and Republican Victoria Spartz to face off in House race in Indiana Key races to watch in Tuesday's primaries The Hill's Campaign Report: More Republican women are running for House seats MORE (R-Ind.): Brooks submitted a letter to the House administrator the day the shutdown began asking her salary be withheld. She said her offices would remain open for constituents. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinDemocratic unity starts to crack in coronavirus liability reform fight Stakes high for Collins in coronavirus relief standoff The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December MORE (D-W.Va.): Manchin says he will donate his pay during the shutdown to food banks across West Virginia in an effort to help feed families that rely on food stamps.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R-Fla.): Buchanan stated in December that he would not accept his salary, saying the shutdown was “another sad example of Washington’s dysfunction and inability to compromise.”

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyTrump says he believes Scarborough 'got away with murder' Hillicon Valley: House FISA bill in jeopardy | Democrats drop controversial surveillance measure | GOP working on legislation to strip Twitter of federal liability protections The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump ramps up attacks against Twitter MORE (R-Wyo.): Cheney requested her salary be withheld during the shutdown, saying it is not “appropriate” for members of Congress to be paid.

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoThe Hill's Campaign Report: Minneapolis protests rock the nation Cortez Masto says she's not interested in being Biden VP The Memo: Activists press Biden on VP choice MORE (D-Nev.): Cortez Masto announced hours before the shutdown took hold that she would donate her salary to a Nevada charity.

Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawGOP lawmakers call for new sanctions on senior Chinese officials Michigan suspends license of barber who vowed to keep his shop open 'until Jesus comes' The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Rep. Hurd says China engaged in global disinformation campaign; US unemployment highest since Great Depression MORE (R-Texas): "I cannot in good conscience get paid while federal employees’ financial futures hang in the balance because of this partial government shutdown. I’ve asked the Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until we have come to an agreement to adequately fund border security," he tweeted Jan. 10.

Rep. Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralCalls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress The Hill's 12:30 Report: Pence visits Orlando as all 50 states reopen The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Mnuchin, Powell: Economy may need more boost; Trump defends malaria drug MORE (D-N.Y.): Espaillat said in December that he asked for his salary to be withheld during the shutdown in solidarity with the “more than 14,000 New Yorkers who are affected during the #TrumpShutdown.”

Rep. Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansBipartisan GROCER Act would give tax break to frontline workers Bipartisan bill aims to help smallest businesses weather the coronavirus crisis The State of the Union on homelessness — proven solutions can't withstand budget cuts MORE (D-Pa.): Evans asked the House administrator Wednesday to withhold his salary, saying he was inspired after he talked with an air traffic control worker and mother affected by the shutdown.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickBipartisan group demands House prioritize communities of color in coronavirus relief bill Fitzpatrick to face Democrat Christina Finello in key Pennsylvania House race Key races to watch in Tuesday's primaries MORE (R-Pa.): Fitzpatrick said he would forfeit his salary during the shutdown, decrying it as an example of “a failure to lead from both parties” and urging other colleagues to join him. “Let’s send a message to the extreme partisans on both sides: do your job or don’t get paid,” he said in a statement.

Rep. Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteKathleen Williams, Matt Rosendale to face off for Montana House seat Gianforte wins Montana gubernatorial primary Key races to watch in Tuesday's primaries MORE (R-Mont.): “I strongly believe it is inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid while portions of the federal government remain shut down,” Gianforte wrote in a letter Thursday requesting that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenIf anyone has taken US-China relations to the brink of a new cold war, it's the Chinese Communist Party Scalise blasts Democrats for calling on certain companies to return PPP loans Scalise targets China, WHO response from coronavirus oversight perch MORE (R-Tenn.): Green said Friday it was inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid “while hardworking border security agents and other civil servants are furloughed” in a letter to the House administrator

Rep. Kevin HernKevin HernMusic venues turn to K Street with industry under threat Lawmakers ask Trump administration to help Gulf oil and gas producers Conservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess MORE (R-Okla.): Hern, who introduced a bill to hold members’ pay during shutdowns, said Monday he would donate his salary to several veterans’ groups

Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillHow lawmaker ties helped shape Fed chairman's COVID-19 response Treasury has not disbursed B in airline support: oversight panel On The Money: Black workers may face disproportionate COVID-19 risk | Trump pick for pandemic response watchdog vows independence | Stocks inch higher as oil prices rise MORE (R-Ark.): Hill said in December he “cannot in good conscience accept pay while federal employees are not receiving theirs” and asked his salary be withheld.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoFederal judges should be allowed to be Federalist Society members Senate Dems press DOJ over coronavirus safety precautions in juvenile detention centers Conservative group launches campaign accusing Democrats of hypocrisy on Kavanuagh, Biden MORE (D-Hawaii): Hirono announced in December she would donate her salary from the shutdown to food banks across Hawaii and noted that “More than 2,500 federal workers in Hawaii are either furloughed or working without pay during the holidays.” 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenBipartisan senators seek funding for pork producers forced to euthanize livestock House Republicans threaten pushback on Saudi Arabia amid oil market slump Overnight Energy: Trump rollback of Obama mileage standards faces court challenges | Court strikes down EPA suspension of Obama greenhouse gas rule | Trump floats cutting domestic oil production MORE (R-N.D.): Hoeven told Forum News Service that he will donate his salary to the North Dakota National Guard Foundation.

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdScaled-back Pride Month poses challenges for fundraising, outreach The Hill's Morning Report - Protesters' defiance met with calls to listen GOP Rep. Will Hurd marches with protesters in Houston MORE (R-Texas): Slamming the shutdown as “needless,” Hurd requested in December that his pay be withheld “while other federal employees suffer.”

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The American Investment Council - Trump takes his 'ready to reopen' mantra on the road GE cutting up to one-quarter of aviation unit's workers Boeing suspends Washington production, GE Aviation lays off thousands MORE (R-Ohio): Joyce requested in December that is pay be withheld, saying “If Congress can’t keep the government fully operational, we shouldn’t get paid. It’s that simple.”

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiHouse subcommittee says Trump administration did not adequately screen travelers from Italy, South Korea for COVID-19 Lawmakers push for mental health funding for providers in next aid package FDA grants emergency approval to Swiss firm's coronavirus antibody test MORE (D-Ill.): "In solidarity with government employees working for the American people without pay, furloughed workers, and taxpayers denied government services because of this shutdown, I’ve requested that my salary be withheld until the conclusion of the shutdown. I’m donating my pay from the December portion of the shutdown to charity," the lawmaker wrote in a statement released the second week of January.

Rep. Bob Latta (R-Ohio): Latta wrote in a Facebook post last month that he had asked that his pay be withheld during the shutdown, arguing that members of Congress shouldn't get salaries at a time when federal workers were not receiving pay.

Rep. Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaGun control group rolls out House endorsements The Hill's Campaign Report: DOJ, intel to be major issues in 2020 House GOP lawmaker breaks with party to back proxy voting MORE (D-Va.): Luria said Thursday she does not believe it is “fair or appropriate” for members of Congress to receive paychecks during a shutdown. She said as a 20-year Navy veteran, she has “firsthand knowledge of how government shutdowns threaten out military preparedness and readiness.” 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.): A co-sponsor of the No Budget, No Pay Act, Maloney requested in December that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsTrump names new acting director of legislative affairs House Judiciary to hear whistleblowers on 'politicization' of Justice Dept under Trump How Trump cleared the park around the White House for church photo op MORE (R-N.C.): “As long as our border security agents, air traffic controllers and TSA agents are not paid and their families not supported, I will not accept any salary,” Meadows wrote in December to the House administrator.

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellGOP lawmakers say Steve King's loss could help them in November Democrats on edge over California special election nail-biter Michigan GOP congressman sues governor over emergency orders MORE (R-Mich.): “If employees affected by this shutdown do not get paid, neither should members of Congress,” wrote in a Facebook post showing his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.): O’Halleran in December vowed to forfeit his salary if the government shut down and slammed congressional leaders for “allowing partisan gridlock to get in the way of funding our government and preventing a shutdown yet again.”

Rep. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonPeople over politics on PPP funding Kulkarni wins Texas House Democratic primary Former sheriff, GOP mega-donor headed to runoff in Texas GOP race MORE (R-Texas): Olson requested Wednesday that his pay be withheld, saying “Federal employees should not be held hostage to dysfunction & inability to solve the problem.”

Rep. Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasExpanding tax credit for businesses retaining workers gains bipartisan support The Hill's Campaign Report: Buzz builds around Warren for VP Gun control group rolls out House endorsements MORE (D-N.H.): Pappas, a former small business owner, asked Thursday for his salary to be withheld. “As someone who has run a small business, I could not imagine receiving a paycheck while any of my employees are working without pay. My first official act as a member of Congress is to reject a paycheck until Congress does its job and the government is re-opened,” Pappas, a freshman congressman, tweeted.

Rep. Max RoseMax RoseMax Rose calls for National Guard to be deployed to NYC to enforce curfew Gun control group rolls out House endorsements Max Rose calls on Trump to use Defense Production Act to ensure small businesses have PPE MORE (D-N.Y.): Rose, another freshman congressman, said he would donate any pay earned during the shutdown. “This shutdown is an insult to all Americans who work their heart out every day b/c unlike Congress they cant afford to act like children,” he tweeted Sunday

Sen. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenThe Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mnuchin sees 'strong likelihood' of another relief package; Warner says some businesses 'may not come back' at The Hill's Advancing America's Economy summit The Hill's Coronavirus Report: CDC Director Redfield responds to Navarro criticism; Mnuchin and Powell brief Senate panel Hillicon Valley: Experts raise security concerns about online voting | Musk finds supporter in Trump | Officials warn that Chinese hackers targeting COVID-19 research groups MORE (D-Nev.): Rosen said she would donate her salary to state organizations “aimed at helping survivors of sexual and domestic violence.” Authorization for the Violence Against Women Act lapsed with the shutdown.

Rep. Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderIllinois governor endorses Biden one day before primary Durbin endorses Biden: He 'can start to heal the wounds of this divided nation' Duckworth endorses Biden ahead of Super Tuesday MORE (D-Ill.): Noting that he has done the same in previous shutdowns, Schneider said in December he would return his salary to the Treasury Department. Schneider is a co-sponsor of the Hold Congress Accountable Act, which would suspend pay for members of congress during shutdowns. 

Rep. Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillGun control group rolls out House endorsements Bipartisan Senate group offers new help to state, local governments Human Rights Campaign rolls out congressional endorsements on Equality Act anniversary MORE (D-N.J.): A former federal employee herself, Sherrill requested Tuesday that her pay be withheld. “I came here to govern, not engage in partisan politics at the expense of hardworking Americans,” Sherrill, a freshman congresswoman, tweeted.

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinOvernight Defense: Trump's move to use military in US sparks backlash | Defense officials take heat | Air Force head calls Floyd's death 'a national tragedy' Democrats blast Trump's use of military against protests Gun control group rolls out House endorsements MORE (D-Mich.): Slotkin, who oversaw the furloughs of hundreds of personnel at the Pentagon during a past shutdown, requested Thursday that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Ross SpanoVincent (Ross) Ross SpanoHillicon Valley: Uber lays off 3,000 | FBI unlocks Pensacola shooter's phones | Lawmakers introduce bill restricting purchase of airline equipment from Chinese companies Bipartisan bill would restrict purchases of airport equipment from Chinese companies Campaigns face attack ad dilemma amid coronavirus crisis MORE (R-Fla.): “I would support legislation forcing members of Congress to forfeit pay during any government shutdown, and I pledge not to take a paycheck until this impasse is resolved,” Spano said in a statement Thursday. 

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikBipartisan House bill seeks to improve pandemic preparedness The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mastercard CEO Ajay Banga says supporting small business single most important thing we should do now; Teva's Brendan O'Grady says U.S. should stockpile strategic reserve in drugs like Strategic Oil Reserve House GOP to launch China probes beyond COVID-19 MORE (R-N.Y.): Stefanik requested the day the shutdown began that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Van TaylorNicholas (Van) Van Campen TaylorFormer Texas Rep. Sam Johnson dies at 89 House GOP urge Trump against supporting additional funding for state and local governments Congress tiptoes toward remote voting MORE (R-Texas): “Members of Congress should not be paid when critical federal employees, including our border patrol agents, are denied their paychecks,” Taylor tweeted Thursday, attaching with his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Michael WaltzMichael WaltzThe real virus to the Chinese Communist Party: religious freedom 125 lawmakers urge Trump administration to support National Guard troops amid pandemic Trump campaign launches new fundraising program with House Republicans MORE (R-Fla.): “I will not accept a paycheck until the men and women providing national security functions are compensated,” Waltz posted on Facebook Friday.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenTwitter CEO: 'Not true' that removing Trump campaign video was illegal, as president has claimed Biden formally clinches Democratic presidential nomination Warren, Pressley introduce bill to make it a crime for police officers to deny medical care to people in custody MORE (D-Mass.): Warren announced Tuesday she will donate her salary during the shutdown to HIAS, an organization that supports refugees. 

Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonDemocratic lawmaker calls for Peace Corps, Americorps volunteers to be eligible for unemployment benefits Black voters propel Biden to big wins in Virginia, NC, Alabama Biden notches major win in Virginia primary MORE (D-Va.): “Because members of Congress continue to receive their pay during these shutdowns even though our constituents do not, please withhold my pay until an appropriations agreement has been reached and other federal employees begin receiving their pay,” Wexton, a freshman congresswoman wrote in a letter to the House administrator.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthEx-CBO director calls for more than trillion in coronavirus stimulus spending Rep slams 'vulgar images' and 'racist words' that disrupted virtual youth anti-violence event Unemployment to remain above 9 percent into 2021: CBO MORE (D-Ky.): A spokesperson confirmed that Yarmuth has donated his post-tax salary every year since he was elected in 2007 and will do so for 2018.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mnuchin sees 'strong likelihood' of another relief package; Warner says some businesses 'may not come back' at The Hill's Advancing America's Economy summit MORE (R-N.Y.): “It's crazy to me that Members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not,” Zeldin said in a December statement. “I instructed the House Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until this partial government shutdown ends.”

 

– Updated on Jan. 10 at 3:27 p.m.