Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown

Several lawmakers have said they will forfeit or donate their paychecks as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. 

Approximately 25 percent of the government shut down on Dec. 22, including the Departments of Homeland Security, Agriculture, Treasury, Commerce, Justice, Interior and State. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have either been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

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While federal workers received their scheduled paychecks last week, thousands could see a delay in getting their next one, scheduled for Jan. 11, if a spending deal isn’t reached on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Here are some of the lawmakers relinquishing their salaries as the shutdown continues:

Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.): Bacon wrote a letter to the House chief administrative officer in December that “Members of Congress should be treated the same as all other federal employees who are impacted by a government shutdown … Fairness and decency dictates that my pay also be withheld.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.): Blumenthal pledged in December to donate his Senate pay to Homes for the Brave, a charity that provides homes to homeless Connecticut veterans.

Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksThe rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2019 Hispanic Democrats endorse Latina for open Indiana seat Trump shocks, earns GOP rebukes with Dingell remarks MORE (R-Ind.): Brooks submitted a letter to the House administrator the day the shutdown began asking her salary be withheld. She said her offices would remain open for constituents. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinOvernight Energy: Murkowski, Manchin unveil major energy bill | Lawmakers grill EPA chief over push to slash agency's budget | GOP lawmaker accuses Trump officials of 'playing politics' over Yucca Mountain Murkowski, Manchin introduce major energy legislation The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders takes incoming during intense SC debate MORE (D-W.Va.): Manchin says he will donate his pay during the shutdown to food banks across West Virginia in an effort to help feed families that rely on food stamps.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R-Fla.): Buchanan stated in December that he would not accept his salary, saying the shutdown was “another sad example of Washington’s dysfunction and inability to compromise.”

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyCheney, House Republicans express 'serious concerns' with US-Taliban deal This week: House to vote on legislation to make lynching a federal hate crime Overnight Defense: GOP lawmaker takes unannounced trip to Syria | Taliban leader pens New York Times op-ed on peace talks | Cheney blasts paper for publishing op-ed MORE (R-Wyo.): Cheney requested her salary be withheld during the shutdown, saying it is not “appropriate” for members of Congress to be paid.

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoProgressives hope Nevada offers roadmap for pro-union 2020 victory Kennedy, Markey spar over experience in first Senate primary debate DSCC endorses McGrath in race against McConnell MORE (D-Nev.): Cortez Masto announced hours before the shutdown took hold that she would donate her salary to a Nevada charity.

Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawPush for national popular vote movement gets boost from conservatives Pete Davidson jokes he was told to apologize to Crenshaw 'so that I didn't get shot in the face' Gun control group plans to spend million in Texas in 2020 MORE (R-Texas): "I cannot in good conscience get paid while federal employees’ financial futures hang in the balance because of this partial government shutdown. I’ve asked the Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until we have come to an agreement to adequately fund border security," he tweeted Jan. 10.

Rep. Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralDemocrats ramp up calls for war powers vote after Iran strike Democrats vow court victories won't slow impeachment timeline Overnight Defense: Protests at Trump's NYC Veterans Day speech | House Dems release Pentagon official's deposition transcript | Lawmakers ask Trump to rescind Erdogan invite MORE (D-N.Y.): Espaillat said in December that he asked for his salary to be withheld during the shutdown in solidarity with the “more than 14,000 New Yorkers who are affected during the #TrumpShutdown.”

Rep. Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansOvernight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union — Buttigieg targets Warren, Sanders on health care ahead of debate | Judge overturns ObamaCare transgender protections | Poll sees support drop for 'Medicare for All' A dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal House Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment MORE (D-Pa.): Evans asked the House administrator Wednesday to withhold his salary, saying he was inspired after he talked with an air traffic control worker and mother affected by the shutdown.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDemocrats bullish on bill to create women's history museum: 'It's an election year' This week: Trump's budget lands with a thud on Capitol Hill House approves pro-union labor bill MORE (R-Pa.): Fitzpatrick said he would forfeit his salary during the shutdown, decrying it as an example of “a failure to lead from both parties” and urging other colleagues to join him. “Let’s send a message to the extreme partisans on both sides: do your job or don’t get paid,” he said in a statement.

Rep. Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteGOP leader warns lawmakers on fundraising: 'Getting our ass kicked' Providing more information on the prescription drug supply chain will help lower costs for all Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 MORE (R-Mont.): “I strongly believe it is inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid while portions of the federal government remain shut down,” Gianforte wrote in a letter Thursday requesting that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenPresident Trump's Iran strategy is working Trump says he will 'temporarily hold off' on declaring Mexican drug cartels as terror organization Trump says he will designate Mexican drug cartels as terror organizations MORE (R-Tenn.): Green said Friday it was inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid “while hardworking border security agents and other civil servants are furloughed” in a letter to the House administrator

Rep. Kevin HernKevin HernConservatives call on Pelosi to cancel August recess Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown MORE (R-Okla.): Hern, who introduced a bill to hold members’ pay during shutdowns, said Monday he would donate his salary to several veterans’ groups

Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillPelosi to Democrats: 'Are you ready?' The Suburban Caucus: Solutions for America's suburbs An unintended burden on small businesses MORE (R-Ark.): Hill said in December he “cannot in good conscience accept pay while federal employees are not receiving theirs” and asked his salary be withheld.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocratic senators ask DOJ watchdog to expand Giuliani probe Senate Dems blast Barr for 'clear violation' of duty in Stone case, urge him to resign What the impeachment vote looked like from inside the chamber MORE (D-Hawaii): Hirono announced in December she would donate her salary from the shutdown to food banks across Hawaii and noted that “More than 2,500 federal workers in Hawaii are either furloughed or working without pay during the holidays.” 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenGOP, Democrats hash out 2020 strategy at dueling retreats Senate drama surrounding Trump trial starts to fizzle Bottom Line MORE (R-N.D.): Hoeven told Forum News Service that he will donate his salary to the North Dakota National Guard Foundation.

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdGun control group plans to spend million in Texas in 2020 Trump to attend California fundraiser with Oracle chairman The Hill's Morning Report - Nearing witness vote, GOP rushes to acquit Trump MORE (R-Texas): Slamming the shutdown as “needless,” Hurd requested in December that his pay be withheld “while other federal employees suffer.”

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceDemocrat: Lawmakers need to approach opioid crisis as 'a chronic situation' The Hill's Morning Report - Sanders takes incoming during intense SC debate Overnight Health Care — Presented by American Health Care Association — Lawmakers raise alarms over Trump coronavirus response | Top official warns virus appears inevitable in US | Democrats block two Senate abortion bills MORE (R-Ohio): Joyce requested in December that is pay be withheld, saying “If Congress can’t keep the government fully operational, we shouldn’t get paid. It’s that simple.”

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiHillicon Valley: Barr threatens tech's prized legal shield | House panel seeks information from Amazon's Ring | Trump DOJ backs Oracle in Supreme Court fight against Google | TikTok unveils new safety controls House subcommittee requests information from Ring about cooperation with police, local governments Lawmakers with first-hand experience using food stamps call on Trump not to cut program MORE (D-Ill.): "In solidarity with government employees working for the American people without pay, furloughed workers, and taxpayers denied government services because of this shutdown, I’ve requested that my salary be withheld until the conclusion of the shutdown. I’m donating my pay from the December portion of the shutdown to charity," the lawmaker wrote in a statement released the second week of January.

Rep. Bob Latta (R-Ohio): Latta wrote in a Facebook post last month that he had asked that his pay be withheld during the shutdown, arguing that members of Congress shouldn't get salaries at a time when federal workers were not receiving pay.

Rep. Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaM ad buy praises swing-district Democrats' environmental work Vulnerable Democrats fret over surging Sanders Mixed feelings on war power limits: Lawmakers and vet candidates MORE (D-Va.): Luria said Thursday she does not believe it is “fair or appropriate” for members of Congress to receive paychecks during a shutdown. She said as a 20-year Navy veteran, she has “firsthand knowledge of how government shutdowns threaten out military preparedness and readiness.” 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.): A co-sponsor of the No Budget, No Pay Act, Maloney requested in December that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsSanders, socialism emerge as top targets at CPAC Trump upends controversial surveillance fight House Freedom Caucus chairman endorses Collins's Georgia Senate bid MORE (R-N.C.): “As long as our border security agents, air traffic controllers and TSA agents are not paid and their families not supported, I will not accept any salary,” Meadows wrote in December to the House administrator.

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — House to condemn Trump plan for Medicaid block grants | Chinese doctor who warned of coronavirus dies | CDC ships coronavirus tests GOP lawmaker shreds Democratic resolution on House floor Democrats tear into Trump's speech: It was a 'MAGA rally' MORE (R-Mich.): “If employees affected by this shutdown do not get paid, neither should members of Congress,” wrote in a Facebook post showing his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.): O’Halleran in December vowed to forfeit his salary if the government shut down and slammed congressional leaders for “allowing partisan gridlock to get in the way of funding our government and preventing a shutdown yet again.”

Rep. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonGun control group plans to spend million in Texas in 2020 Republican wins Texas special election Texas House special election to gauge suburban mood MORE (R-Texas): Olson requested Wednesday that his pay be withheld, saying “Federal employees should not be held hostage to dysfunction & inability to solve the problem.”

Rep. Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasAmerica needs a transformative transportation bill: It will take walking and biking to get there New Hampshire Rep. Kuster endorses Buttigieg Making waves to protect America's waters MORE (D-N.H.): Pappas, a former small business owner, asked Thursday for his salary to be withheld. “As someone who has run a small business, I could not imagine receiving a paycheck while any of my employees are working without pay. My first official act as a member of Congress is to reject a paycheck until Congress does its job and the government is re-opened,” Pappas, a freshman congressman, tweeted.

Rep. Max RoseMax RoseVulnerable Democrats fret over surging Sanders Rose, former FBI agent pen op-ed about the danger of global white nationalism: 'Terrorism is terrorism' MLB, Congress play hardball in fight over minor leagues MORE (D-N.Y.): Rose, another freshman congressman, said he would donate any pay earned during the shutdown. “This shutdown is an insult to all Americans who work their heart out every day b/c unlike Congress they cant afford to act like children,” he tweeted Sunday

Sen. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenOvernight Defense: Lawmakers tear into Pentagon over .8B for border wall | Dems offer bill to reverse Trump on wall funding | Senators urge UN to restore Iran sanctions Bipartisan Senate resolution would urge UN to renew Iran arms embargo, travel restrictions Schumer reminds colleagues to respect decorum at State of the Union speech MORE (D-Nev.): Rosen said she would donate her salary to state organizations “aimed at helping survivors of sexual and domestic violence.” Authorization for the Violence Against Women Act lapsed with the shutdown.

Rep. Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderHarris, Castro introduce resolution condemning Trump aide Stephen Miller Palestinians face shrinking options with Trump peace plan Illinois lawmaker latest to endorse Biden for president MORE (D-Ill.): Noting that he has done the same in previous shutdowns, Schneider said in December he would return his salary to the Treasury Department. Schneider is a co-sponsor of the Hold Congress Accountable Act, which would suspend pay for members of congress during shutdowns. 

Rep. Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillVulnerable Democrats fret over surging Sanders New Jersey Rep. Sherrill endorses Bloomberg Overnight Defense: Dems raise pressure on Esper to block border wall funds | Trump impeachment trial begins in Senate | Day one dominated by fight over rules MORE (D-N.J.): A former federal employee herself, Sherrill requested Tuesday that her pay be withheld. “I came here to govern, not engage in partisan politics at the expense of hardworking Americans,” Sherrill, a freshman congresswoman, tweeted.

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinM ad buy praises swing-district Democrats' environmental work The Hill's Campaign Report: Buttigieg, Sanders ahead in Iowa debacle Vulnerable House Democrats benefit from fundraising surge amid impeachment MORE (D-Mich.): Slotkin, who oversaw the furloughs of hundreds of personnel at the Pentagon during a past shutdown, requested Thursday that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Ross SpanoVincent (Ross) Ross SpanoOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Democrats seek to preempt Trump message on health care | E-cigarette executives set for grilling | Dems urge emergency funding for coronavirus Democrats slam GOP on drug prices in bilingual digital ads DCCC to run ads tying 11 House Republicans to Trump remarks on entitlements MORE (R-Fla.): “I would support legislation forcing members of Congress to forfeit pay during any government shutdown, and I pledge not to take a paycheck until this impasse is resolved,” Spano said in a statement Thursday. 

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWhere do we go from here? Conservation can show the way The Hill's Morning Report — Trump basks in acquittal; Dems eye recanvass in Iowa Trump holds White House 'celebration' for impeachment acquittal MORE (R-N.Y.): Stefanik requested the day the shutdown began that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Van TaylorNicholas (Van) Van Campen TaylorHouse GOP criticizes impeachment drive as distracting from national security issues 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill Freshman House Dems surge past GOP in money race MORE (R-Texas): “Members of Congress should not be paid when critical federal employees, including our border patrol agents, are denied their paychecks,” Taylor tweeted Thursday, attaching with his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Michael WaltzMichael WaltzTrump takes track to open Daytona 500 Overnight Defense: US deploys low-yield nukes on submarines | Watchdog warns Iraq withdrawal 'likely' means ISIS resurgence | What to watch in Trump's State of the Union Sunday shows preview: Lawmakers gear up for Senate impeachment trial MORE (R-Fla.): “I will not accept a paycheck until the men and women providing national security functions are compensated,” Waltz posted on Facebook Friday.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenBloomberg: 'I'm going to stay right to the bitter end' of Democratic primary race The Memo: Biden seeks revival in South Carolina Sanders holds 13-point lead in Fox News poll MORE (D-Mass.): Warren announced Tuesday she will donate her salary during the shutdown to HIAS, an organization that supports refugees. 

Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonDemocrats press World Bank chief on meeting with Ukrainian president amid Trump pressure Pelosi invites head of disability advocacy group to State of the Union Giffords gun reform group backs eight 'strong women' in House reelection bids MORE (D-Va.): “Because members of Congress continue to receive their pay during these shutdowns even though our constituents do not, please withhold my pay until an appropriations agreement has been reached and other federal employees begin receiving their pay,” Wexton, a freshman congresswoman wrote in a letter to the House administrator.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthBudget hawks frustrated by 2020 politics in entitlement reform fight On The Money: Deficit spikes 25 percent through January | Mnuchin declines to say why Trump pulled Treasury nominee who oversaw Roger Stone case | Lawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts Lawmakers trade insults over Trump budget cuts MORE (D-Ky.): A spokesperson confirmed that Yarmuth has donated his post-tax salary every year since he was elected in 2007 and will do so for 2018.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinSanders: 'Unfair to simply say everything is bad' in Cuba under Castro Trump allies blast Romney over impeachment vote: 'A sore loser' Overnight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Democrats seek to preempt Trump message on health care | E-cigarette executives set for grilling | Dems urge emergency funding for coronavirus MORE (R-N.Y.): “It's crazy to me that Members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not,” Zeldin said in a December statement. “I instructed the House Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until this partial government shutdown ends.”

 

– Updated on Jan. 10 at 3:27 p.m.