Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown

Several lawmakers have said they will forfeit or donate their paychecks as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. 

Approximately 25 percent of the government shut down on Dec. 22, including the Departments of Homeland Security, Agriculture, Treasury, Commerce, Justice, Interior and State. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have either been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

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While federal workers received their scheduled paychecks last week, thousands could see a delay in getting their next one, scheduled for Jan. 11, if a spending deal isn’t reached on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Here are some of the lawmakers relinquishing their salaries as the shutdown continues:

Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.): Bacon wrote a letter to the House chief administrative officer in December that “Members of Congress should be treated the same as all other federal employees who are impacted by a government shutdown … Fairness and decency dictates that my pay also be withheld.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.): Blumenthal pledged in December to donate his Senate pay to Homes for the Brave, a charity that provides homes to homeless Connecticut veterans.

Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act The GOP's commitment to electing talented women can help party retake the House MORE (R-Ind.): Brooks submitted a letter to the House administrator the day the shutdown began asking her salary be withheld. She said her offices would remain open for constituents. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinLabor head warns of 'frightening uptick' in black lung disease among miners Labor leader: Trump has stopped erosion of coal jobs Overnight Energy: States fight Trump rollback of Obama lightbulb rules | Greens seek hearing over proposed rule on energy efficiency tests | Top Dem asks GAO to investigate climate threat MORE (D-W.Va.): Manchin says he will donate his pay during the shutdown to food banks across West Virginia in an effort to help feed families that rely on food stamps.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R-Fla.): Buchanan stated in December that he would not accept his salary, saying the shutdown was “another sad example of Washington’s dysfunction and inability to compromise.”

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyThe GOP's commitment to electing talented women can help party retake the House GOP launches anti-BDS discharge petition Republicans amp up attacks on Tlaib's Holocaust comments MORE (R-Wyo.): Cheney requested her salary be withheld during the shutdown, saying it is not “appropriate” for members of Congress to be paid.

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoThis week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report Schumer, author discussed possible Kansas Senate run: report Life in the minority at the FCC MORE (D-Nev.): Cortez Masto announced hours before the shutdown took hold that she would donate her salary to a Nevada charity.

Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawThirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Behar clashes with Dan Crenshaw on Trump's Charlottesville comments Trump says New York Times should apologize for more than 'terrible Anti-Semitic Cartoon' MORE (R-Texas): "I cannot in good conscience get paid while federal employees’ financial futures hang in the balance because of this partial government shutdown. I’ve asked the Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until we have come to an agreement to adequately fund border security," he tweeted Jan. 10.

Rep. Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralDems charge ahead on immigration Hispanic Caucus asks for meeting with top immigration official New Zealand mosque killings raise fears among US Muslims MORE (D-N.Y.): Espaillat said in December that he asked for his salary to be withheld during the shutdown in solidarity with the “more than 14,000 New Yorkers who are affected during the #TrumpShutdown.”

Rep. Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) Michael EvansTen Dem lawmakers added to House Ways and Means Committee Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown Dem leaders fend off calls to impeach Trump MORE (D-Pa.): Evans asked the House administrator Wednesday to withhold his salary, saying he was inspired after he talked with an air traffic control worker and mother affected by the shutdown.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act This week: House to vote on bill to ban LGBTQ discrimination MORE (R-Pa.): Fitzpatrick said he would forfeit his salary during the shutdown, decrying it as an example of “a failure to lead from both parties” and urging other colleagues to join him. “Let’s send a message to the extreme partisans on both sides: do your job or don’t get paid,” he said in a statement.

Rep. Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteJournalists seek federal, state support for right to inform the public Don Lemon, Chris Cuomo criticize Trump’s response to Coast Guard lieutenant's arrest Sarah Sanders: Trump hasn't ‘at any point’ done anything but ‘condemn violence against journalists' MORE (R-Mont.): “I strongly believe it is inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid while portions of the federal government remain shut down,” Gianforte wrote in a letter Thursday requesting that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenGOP rep introducing bill offering alternative Medicaid program The Hill's Morning Report - Barr stiff-arms House following Senate grilling Overnight Energy — Presented by Job Creators Network — House Republican tries to force Green New Deal vote | 'Awkward' hearing to vet Interior nominee and watchdog | House panel approves bill to stop drilling in Arctic refuge MORE (R-Tenn.): Green said Friday it was inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid “while hardworking border security agents and other civil servants are furloughed” in a letter to the House administrator

Rep. Kevin HernKevin HernHere are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown MORE (R-Okla.): Hern, who introduced a bill to hold members’ pay during shutdowns, said Monday he would donate his salary to several veterans’ groups

Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillRestore Pell Grant eligibility to people in prison Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown Rep. French Hill wins after unexpected challenge MORE (R-Ark.): Hill said in December he “cannot in good conscience accept pay while federal employees are not receiving theirs” and asked his salary be withheld.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoSenate confirms Rosen for No. 2 spot at DOJ Alabama abortion law sparks fears Supreme Court may overturn Roe v. Wade The CASE Act is an opportunity for creators to have rights and remedies MORE (D-Hawaii): Hirono announced in December she would donate her salary from the shutdown to food banks across Hawaii and noted that “More than 2,500 federal workers in Hawaii are either furloughed or working without pay during the holidays.” 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenSenators introduce bill to prevent border agency from selling personal data Overnight Energy: Bipartisan Senate group seeks more funding for carbon capture technology | Dems want documents on Interior pick's lobbying work | Officials push to produce more electric vehicle batteries in US Officials, automakers aim to produce more electric vehicle batteries in US: report MORE (R-N.D.): Hoeven told Forum News Service that he will donate his salary to the North Dakota National Guard Foundation.

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act Iraq War vet Ortiz Jones sets up rematch against Hurd in Texas MORE (R-Texas): Slamming the shutdown as “needless,” Hurd requested in December that his pay be withheld “while other federal employees suffer.”

Rep. David JoyceDavid Patrick JoyceThe STATES Act will expose flawed marijuana legacy Bipartisan bill to protect legal cannabis businesses introduced EPA chief doubles down on Trump's commitment to fully fund Great Lakes program MORE (R-Ohio): Joyce requested in December that is pay be withheld, saying “If Congress can’t keep the government fully operational, we shouldn’t get paid. It’s that simple.”

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiLawmakers say improving transparency in higher education offers chance for bipartisanship Dem lawmaker calls bipartisan College Transparency Act a 'game changer' for higher education The Hill's Morning Report - Lawmakers split over Mueller findings: 'case closed' vs. 'cover-up' MORE (D-Ill.): "In solidarity with government employees working for the American people without pay, furloughed workers, and taxpayers denied government services because of this shutdown, I’ve requested that my salary be withheld until the conclusion of the shutdown. I’m donating my pay from the December portion of the shutdown to charity," the lawmaker wrote in a statement released the second week of January.

Rep. Bob Latta (R-Ohio): Latta wrote in a Facebook post last month that he had asked that his pay be withheld during the shutdown, arguing that members of Congress shouldn't get salaries at a time when federal workers were not receiving pay.

Rep. Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaHouse Dems launch Servicewomen and Women Veterans caucus New group aims to support female veteran Democratic candidates Virginia special prosecutor indicts former GOP campaign staffer MORE (D-Va.): Luria said Thursday she does not believe it is “fair or appropriate” for members of Congress to receive paychecks during a shutdown. She said as a 20-year Navy veteran, she has “firsthand knowledge of how government shutdowns threaten out military preparedness and readiness.” 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.): A co-sponsor of the No Budget, No Pay Act, Maloney requested in December that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark Randall MeadowsThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Pass USMCA Coalition - After GOP infighting, Trump Jr. agrees to testify again On The Money: House chairman issues subpoenas for Trump's tax returns | Trump touts trade talks as China, US fail to reach deal | Five things to know about Trump's trade war with China | GOP offers support for Trump on tariffs GOP offers support for Trump on China tariffs MORE (R-N.C.): “As long as our border security agents, air traffic controllers and TSA agents are not paid and their families not supported, I will not accept any salary,” Meadows wrote in December to the House administrator.

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellLawmakers say improving transparency in higher education offers chance for bipartisanship Dem lawmaker calls bipartisan College Transparency Act a 'game changer' for higher education The Hill's Morning Report - Lawmakers split over Mueller findings: 'case closed' vs. 'cover-up' MORE (R-Mich.): “If employees affected by this shutdown do not get paid, neither should members of Congress,” wrote in a Facebook post showing his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.): O’Halleran in December vowed to forfeit his salary if the government shut down and slammed congressional leaders for “allowing partisan gridlock to get in the way of funding our government and preventing a shutdown yet again.”

Rep. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonDCCC opens Texas office to protect House pickups, target vulnerable GOP seats The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for MORE (R-Texas): Olson requested Wednesday that his pay be withheld, saying “Federal employees should not be held hostage to dysfunction & inability to solve the problem.”

Rep. Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasNew Hampshire Democrat: 'I wouldn't write off someone like Bill Weld' Dem lawmaker calls for gas tax increase to help pay for infrastructure package The Hill's Morning Report - The heat turns up on Bill Barr MORE (D-N.H.): Pappas, a former small business owner, asked Thursday for his salary to be withheld. “As someone who has run a small business, I could not imagine receiving a paycheck while any of my employees are working without pay. My first official act as a member of Congress is to reject a paycheck until Congress does its job and the government is re-opened,” Pappas, a freshman congressman, tweeted.

Rep. Max RoseMax RoseHillicon Valley: Trump signs cybersecurity executive order | Facebook bans 'dangerous' figures | Dems slam tech's response to extremist content | Trump meets Foxconn CEO over Wisconsin factory plans Dems slam 'vague explanations' by tech firms on extremist content House bill seeks to bolster security for synagogues, mosques in wake of attacks MORE (D-N.Y.): Rose, another freshman congressman, said he would donate any pay earned during the shutdown. “This shutdown is an insult to all Americans who work their heart out every day b/c unlike Congress they cant afford to act like children,” he tweeted Sunday

Sen. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenLawmakers introduce legislation to improve cyber workforce funding Dem lawmakers accuse DHS, HHS of giving them misleading information on family separations This week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report MORE (D-Nev.): Rosen said she would donate her salary to state organizations “aimed at helping survivors of sexual and domestic violence.” Authorization for the Violence Against Women Act lapsed with the shutdown.

Rep. Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderOmar hits back at Pelosi over BDS remarks Hoyer defends Israel in veiled shot at Omar House Dems unveil measure to reject anti-Israel boycotts MORE (D-Ill.): Noting that he has done the same in previous shutdowns, Schneider said in December he would return his salary to the Treasury Department. Schneider is a co-sponsor of the Hold Congress Accountable Act, which would suspend pay for members of congress during shutdowns. 

Rep. Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillHouse Dems launch Servicewomen and Women Veterans caucus Booker takes early lead in 2020 endorsements The 31 Trump districts that will determine the next House majority MORE (D-N.J.): A former federal employee herself, Sherrill requested Tuesday that her pay be withheld. “I came here to govern, not engage in partisan politics at the expense of hardworking Americans,” Sherrill, a freshman congresswoman, tweeted.

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinNew group aims to support female veteran Democratic candidates Michigan Dem rips DeVos for not meeting with Nassar abuse victims Dems unveil anti-workplace harassment bill MORE (D-Mich.): Slotkin, who oversaw the furloughs of hundreds of personnel at the Pentagon during a past shutdown, requested Thursday that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Ross SpanoVincent (Ross) Ross SpanoThirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for MORE (R-Fla.): “I would support legislation forcing members of Congress to forfeit pay during any government shutdown, and I pledge not to take a paycheck until this impasse is resolved,” Spano said in a statement Thursday. 

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikHere are the eight Republicans who voted with Democrats on the Equality Act House approves anti-LGBT discrimination Equality Act The GOP's commitment to electing talented women can help party retake the House MORE (R-N.Y.): Stefanik requested the day the shutdown began that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Van TaylorNicholas (Van) Van Campen TaylorFreshman House Dems surge past GOP in money race Bipartisan group introduces legislation to protect federal workers' health benefits during shutdowns The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems aim to end anti-Semitism controversy with vote today MORE (R-Texas): “Members of Congress should not be paid when critical federal employees, including our border patrol agents, are denied their paychecks,” Taylor tweeted Thursday, attaching with his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Michael WaltzMichael WaltzFlorida governor says Russia hacked two counties in 2016 McCarthy, allies retaliate against Freedom Caucus leader Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown MORE (R-Fla.): “I will not accept a paycheck until the men and women providing national security functions are compensated,” Waltz posted on Facebook Friday.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHere are the potential candidates still eyeing 2020 bids Sanders unveils education plan that would ban for-profit charter schools Warren policy ideas show signs of paying off MORE (D-Mass.): Warren announced Tuesday she will donate her salary during the shutdown to HIAS, an organization that supports refugees. 

Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonPelosi, Sanders, Ocasio-Cortez place transgender pride flags outside Capitol Hill offices New Zealand mosque killings raise fears among US Muslims Why block citizenship to immigrants who defend America? MORE (D-Va.): “Because members of Congress continue to receive their pay during these shutdowns even though our constituents do not, please withhold my pay until an appropriations agreement has been reached and other federal employees begin receiving their pay,” Wexton, a freshman congresswoman wrote in a letter to the House administrator.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthBudget chairs pick former Bush official to head CBO Dem leaders feel squeeze on Trump strategy Dems say NYT report on Trump's business losses boosts need to see president's tax returns MORE (D-Ky.): A spokesperson confirmed that Yarmuth has donated his post-tax salary every year since he was elected in 2007 and will do so for 2018.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinGOP lawmaker slams Pelosi over response to Tlaib controversy GOP lawmaker slams Pelosi after imam critical of Israel delivers House invocation Long Island rep wishes Billy Joel happy birthday on House floor MORE (R-N.Y.): “It's crazy to me that Members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not,” Zeldin said in a December statement. “I instructed the House Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until this partial government shutdown ends.”

 

– Updated on Jan. 10 at 3:27 p.m.