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Here are the lawmakers who will forfeit their salaries during the shutdown

Several lawmakers have said they will forfeit or donate their paychecks as a partial government shutdown enters its third week. 

Approximately 25 percent of the government shut down on Dec. 22, including the Departments of Homeland Security, Agriculture, Treasury, Commerce, Justice, Interior and State. Hundreds of thousands of federal workers have either been furloughed or forced to work without pay.

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While federal workers received their scheduled paychecks last week, thousands could see a delay in getting their next one, scheduled for Jan. 11, if a spending deal isn’t reached on Pennsylvania Avenue.

Here are some of the lawmakers relinquishing their salaries as the shutdown continues:

Rep. Don Bacon (R-Neb.): Bacon wrote a letter to the House chief administrative officer in December that “Members of Congress should be treated the same as all other federal employees who are impacted by a government shutdown … Fairness and decency dictates that my pay also be withheld.”

Sen. Richard Blumenthal (D-Conn.): Blumenthal pledged in December to donate his Senate pay to Homes for the Brave, a charity that provides homes to homeless Connecticut veterans.

Rep. Susan BrooksSusan Wiant BrooksBottom line House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Voters elected a record number of Black women to Congress this year — none were Republican MORE (R-Ind.): Brooks submitted a letter to the House administrator the day the shutdown began asking her salary be withheld. She said her offices would remain open for constituents. 

Sen. Joe ManchinJoseph (Joe) ManchinBiden officials hold call with bipartisan group of senators on coronavirus relief plan Harry Reid 'not particularly optimistic' Biden will push to eliminate filibuster Durbin: Senate should consider changes to filibuster MORE (D-W.Va.): Manchin says he will donate his pay during the shutdown to food banks across West Virginia in an effort to help feed families that rely on food stamps.

Rep. Vern BuchananVernon Gale BuchananMORE (R-Fla.): Buchanan stated in December that he would not accept his salary, saying the shutdown was “another sad example of Washington’s dysfunction and inability to compromise.”

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyFive examples of media's sycophancy for Biden on inauguration week House GOP leader says he has 'concerns' over Cheney's impeachment vote Cheney tests Trump grip on GOP post-presidency MORE (R-Wyo.): Cheney requested her salary be withheld during the shutdown, saying it is not “appropriate” for members of Congress to be paid.

Sen. Catherine Cortez MastoCatherine Marie Cortez MastoSenate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee Why are millions still flowing into the presidential inauguration? Transition of power: Greatness meets infamy MORE (D-Nev.): Cortez Masto announced hours before the shutdown took hold that she would donate her salary to a Nevada charity.

Rep. Dan CrenshawDaniel CrenshawCheney tests Trump grip on GOP post-presidency K Street navigates virtual inauguration week Wyoming county votes to censure Liz Cheney for Trump impeachment vote MORE (R-Texas): "I cannot in good conscience get paid while federal employees’ financial futures hang in the balance because of this partial government shutdown. I’ve asked the Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until we have come to an agreement to adequately fund border security," he tweeted Jan. 10.

Rep. Adriano EspaillatAdriano de Jesus Espaillat CabralThe Hill's Morning Report - Biden asks Congress to expand largest relief response in U.S. history Rep. Adriano Espaillat tests positive for COVID-19 ER doctor chosen to lead Hispanic Caucus MORE (D-N.Y.): Espaillat said in December that he asked for his salary to be withheld during the shutdown in solidarity with the “more than 14,000 New Yorkers who are affected during the #TrumpShutdown.”

Rep. Dwight EvansDwight (Dewey) EvansHouse Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Will the next coronavirus relief package leave essential workers behind? Bipartisan GROCER Act would give tax break to frontline workers MORE (D-Pa.): Evans asked the House administrator Wednesday to withhold his salary, saying he was inspired after he talked with an air traffic control worker and mother affected by the shutdown.

Rep. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickCalls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack Trump's assault on the federal government isn't over Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment MORE (R-Pa.): Fitzpatrick said he would forfeit his salary during the shutdown, decrying it as an example of “a failure to lead from both parties” and urging other colleagues to join him. “Let’s send a message to the extreme partisans on both sides: do your job or don’t get paid,” he said in a statement.

Rep. Greg GianforteGregory Richard GianforteGrowing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting Ducey to lead Republican governors GOP holds line in state legislatures, dealing blow to Democrats MORE (R-Mont.): “I strongly believe it is inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid while portions of the federal government remain shut down,” Gianforte wrote in a letter Thursday requesting that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark GreenMark GreenREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Here are the Republicans planning to challenge the Electoral College results Republicans press FBI for briefing on efforts by Chinese government operatives to gain influence with lawmakers MORE (R-Tenn.): Green said Friday it was inappropriate for members of Congress to be paid “while hardworking border security agents and other civil servants are furloughed” in a letter to the House administrator

Rep. Kevin HernKevin HernREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee Lawmakers call for small business aid at all levels of government MORE (R-Okla.): Hern, who introduced a bill to hold members’ pay during shutdowns, said Monday he would donate his salary to several veterans’ groups

Rep. French HillJames (French) French HillOversight committee member questions Treasury Department's approval of 0M loan to shipping firm House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Mnuchin faces heat over coronavirus rescue loan to trucking company MORE (R-Ark.): Hill said in December he “cannot in good conscience accept pay while federal employees are not receiving theirs” and asked his salary be withheld.

Sen. Mazie HironoMazie Keiko HironoDemocrats seek answers on impact of Russian cyberattack on Justice Department, Courts Senate Democrats file ethics complaint against Hawley, Cruz over Capitol attack Democratic senator raises concerns about inauguration security MORE (D-Hawaii): Hirono announced in December she would donate her salary from the shutdown to food banks across Hawaii and noted that “More than 2,500 federal workers in Hawaii are either furloughed or working without pay during the holidays.” 

Sen. John HoevenJohn Henry HoevenMcConnell about to school Trump on political power for the last time Senate GOP opposition grows to objecting to Electoral College results Man charged with criminal mischief for allegedly vandalizing senator's office with ax MORE (R-N.D.): Hoeven told Forum News Service that he will donate his salary to the North Dakota National Guard Foundation.

Rep. Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse poised to override Trump veto for first time Lawmakers call for including creation of Latino, women's history museums in year-end spending deal House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (R-Texas): Slamming the shutdown as “needless,” Hurd requested in December that his pay be withheld “while other federal employees suffer.”

Rep. David JoyceDavid JoyceHouse Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Candymakers meet virtually with lawmakers for annual fly-in, discuss Halloween safety Stand-alone bill to provide relief for airlines blocked on House floor MORE (R-Ohio): Joyce requested in December that is pay be withheld, saying “If Congress can’t keep the government fully operational, we shouldn’t get paid. It’s that simple.”

Rep. Raja KrishnamoorthiSubramanian (Raja) Raja KrishnamoorthiDemocrat rips Sackler family, Purdue doctors during House questioning Enforcing the Presidential Records Act is essential for preserving our democracy's transparency, history Clinton offers congratulations over Elliot Page announcement MORE (D-Ill.): "In solidarity with government employees working for the American people without pay, furloughed workers, and taxpayers denied government services because of this shutdown, I’ve requested that my salary be withheld until the conclusion of the shutdown. I’m donating my pay from the December portion of the shutdown to charity," the lawmaker wrote in a statement released the second week of January.

Rep. Bob Latta (R-Ohio): Latta wrote in a Facebook post last month that he had asked that his pay be withheld during the shutdown, arguing that members of Congress shouldn't get salaries at a time when federal workers were not receiving pay.

Rep. Elaine LuriaElaine Goodman LuriaChamber-endorsed Dems struggle on election night Overnight Defense: How members of the Armed Services committees fared in Tuesday's elections | Military ballots among those uncounted in too-close-to-call presidential race | Ninth US service member killed by COVID-19 Luria holds onto Virginia House seat MORE (D-Va.): Luria said Thursday she does not believe it is “fair or appropriate” for members of Congress to receive paychecks during a shutdown. She said as a 20-year Navy veteran, she has “firsthand knowledge of how government shutdowns threaten out military preparedness and readiness.” 

Rep. Sean Patrick Maloney (D-N.Y.): A co-sponsor of the No Budget, No Pay Act, Maloney requested in December that his pay be withheld. 

Rep. Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from Inauguration Day Trump leaves White House, promises to be back in 'some form' LIVE INAUGURATION COVERAGE: Biden signs executive orders; press secretary holds first briefing MORE (R-N.C.): “As long as our border security agents, air traffic controllers and TSA agents are not paid and their families not supported, I will not accept any salary,” Meadows wrote in December to the House administrator.

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellUnnamed law enforcement banned under the new NDAA Growing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting Juan Williams: The GOP's betrayal of America MORE (R-Mich.): “If employees affected by this shutdown do not get paid, neither should members of Congress,” wrote in a Facebook post showing his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.): O’Halleran in December vowed to forfeit his salary if the government shut down and slammed congressional leaders for “allowing partisan gridlock to get in the way of funding our government and preventing a shutdown yet again.”

Rep. Pete OlsonPeter (Pete) Graham OlsonHouse Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Republican Fort Bend County Sheriff wins Texas House seat 10 bellwether House races to watch on election night MORE (R-Texas): Olson requested Wednesday that his pay be withheld, saying “Federal employees should not be held hostage to dysfunction & inability to solve the problem.”

Rep. Chris PappasChristopher (Chris) Charles PappasPappas fends off challenge from ex-Trump official in NH Centrist Democrats got their COVID bill, now they want a vote Trump-backed candidate wins NH GOP primary to take on Pappas MORE (D-N.H.): Pappas, a former small business owner, asked Thursday for his salary to be withheld. “As someone who has run a small business, I could not imagine receiving a paycheck while any of my employees are working without pay. My first official act as a member of Congress is to reject a paycheck until Congress does its job and the government is re-opened,” Pappas, a freshman congressman, tweeted.

Rep. Max RoseMax RoseOvernight Defense: Austin takes helm at Pentagon | COVID-19 briefing part of Day 1 agenda | Outrage over images of National Guard troops in parking garage Austin sworn in as nation's first Black Pentagon chief We lost in November — we're proud we didn't take corporate PAC money MORE (D-N.Y.): Rose, another freshman congressman, said he would donate any pay earned during the shutdown. “This shutdown is an insult to all Americans who work their heart out every day b/c unlike Congress they cant afford to act like children,” he tweeted Sunday

Sen. Jacky RosenJacklyn (Jacky) Sheryl RosenSenate approves waiver for Biden's Pentagon nominee House Democrats introduce bill to invest 0 billion in STEM research and education Hillicon Valley: Productivity, fatigue, cybersecurity emerge as top concerns amid pandemic | Facebook critics launch alternative oversight board | Google to temporarily bar election ads after polls close MORE (D-Nev.): Rosen said she would donate her salary to state organizations “aimed at helping survivors of sexual and domestic violence.” Authorization for the Violence Against Women Act lapsed with the shutdown.

Rep. Brad SchneiderBradley (Brad) Scott SchneiderCapitol insurrection fallout: A PATRIOT Act 2.0? Democrats seize on GOP donor fallout The Hill's Morning Report - Biden asks Congress to expand largest relief response in U.S. history MORE (D-Ill.): Noting that he has done the same in previous shutdowns, Schneider said in December he would return his salary to the Treasury Department. Schneider is a co-sponsor of the Hold Congress Accountable Act, which would suspend pay for members of congress during shutdowns. 

Rep. Mikie SherrillRebecca (Mikie) Michelle SherrillCalls grow for 9/11-style panel to probe Capitol attack Do Democrats really want unity? Belfast's Troubles echo in today's Washington MORE (D-N.J.): A former federal employee herself, Sherrill requested Tuesday that her pay be withheld. “I came here to govern, not engage in partisan politics at the expense of hardworking Americans,” Sherrill, a freshman congresswoman, tweeted.

Rep. Elissa SlotkinElissa SlotkinFive centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote Pelosi wins Speakership for fourth time in dramatic vote LIVE COVERAGE: House votes to name Speaker MORE (D-Mich.): Slotkin, who oversaw the furloughs of hundreds of personnel at the Pentagon during a past shutdown, requested Thursday that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Ross SpanoVincent (Ross) Ross SpanoGOP keeps control of Florida House seat held by Rep. Ross Spano 10 bellwether House races to watch on election night The Hill's Morning Report - Jill Biden urges country to embrace her husband MORE (R-Fla.): “I would support legislation forcing members of Congress to forfeit pay during any government shutdown, and I pledge not to take a paycheck until this impasse is resolved,” Spano said in a statement Thursday. 

Rep. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikLincoln Project hits Stefanik in new ad over support for Trump Wyoming county votes to censure Liz Cheney for Trump impeachment vote Stefanik knocks Albany newspaper over 'childless' characterization MORE (R-N.Y.): Stefanik requested the day the shutdown began that her pay be withheld.

Rep. Van TaylorVan TaylorHouse approves rules package for new Congress House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit Van Taylor wins reelection to Texas seat held by GOP since 1968 MORE (R-Texas): “Members of Congress should not be paid when critical federal employees, including our border patrol agents, are denied their paychecks,” Taylor tweeted Thursday, attaching with his letter to the House administrator.

Rep. Michael WaltzMichael WaltzJill Biden visits Capitol to thank National Guard Newspaper editorial board apologizes for endorsing Republican over support for Texas lawsuit Defense pick faces big hurdle MORE (R-Fla.): “I will not accept a paycheck until the men and women providing national security functions are compensated,” Waltz posted on Facebook Friday.

Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenCancel culture comes for the moderates Biden expands on Obama ethics pledge Student loan forgiveness would be windfall for dentists, doctors and lawyers MORE (D-Mass.): Warren announced Tuesday she will donate her salary during the shutdown to HIAS, an organization that supports refugees. 

Rep. Jennifer WextonJennifer Lynn WextonPorter loses seat on House panel overseeing financial sector Democratic lawmakers call for Pence to invoke 25th Amendment, remove Trump from office 7 surprise moments from a tumultuous year in politics MORE (D-Va.): “Because members of Congress continue to receive their pay during these shutdowns even though our constituents do not, please withhold my pay until an appropriations agreement has been reached and other federal employees begin receiving their pay,” Wexton, a freshman congresswoman wrote in a letter to the House administrator.

Rep. John YarmuthJohn Allen YarmuthSenate chaos threatens to slow Biden's agenda Biden reverses Trump's freeze on .4 billion in funds Dem lawmaker says GOP Rep. Boebert gave 'large' group tour days ahead of Capitol attack MORE (D-Ky.): A spokesperson confirmed that Yarmuth has donated his post-tax salary every year since he was elected in 2007 and will do so for 2018.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinWyoming county votes to censure Liz Cheney for Trump impeachment vote GOP divided over Liz Cheney's future READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results MORE (R-N.Y.): “It's crazy to me that Members of Congress get paid while other federal employees do not,” Zeldin said in a December statement. “I instructed the House Chief Administrative Officer to withhold my pay until this partial government shutdown ends.”

 

– Updated on Jan. 10 at 3:27 p.m.