New Dem lawmaker slams Gaetz for using the term 'Sacagawea' to attack Warren

Freshman Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandDemocrats ask Labor Department to investigate Amazon warehouses Snoop Dogg says US women's soccer team deserves same pay as 'sorry ass' men's team Bipartisan House duo unveils amendment to block Iran strike without Congress's approval MORE (D-N.M.), who this week became one of the first two Native American women sworn into Congress, said it was “offensive and hurtful” for Rep. Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzMatt Gaetz hints prosecutor won't press charges against threatening caller for political reasons Hillicon Valley: Twitter says Trump 'go back' tweet didn't violate rules | Unions back protests targeting Amazon 'Prime Day' | Mnuchin voices 'serious concerns' about Facebook crypto project | Congress mobilizes on cyber threats to electric grid House and Senate head for showdown on must-pass defense bill MORE (R-Fla.) to call Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenHarris tops Biden in California 2020 poll The Hill's Morning Report - A raucous debate on race ends with Trump admonishment Democrats fret over Trump cash machine MORE (D-Mass.) “Sacagawea."

Haaland slammed Gaetz for making the comparison to Sacagawea, the Lemhi Shoshone woman who helped the Lewis and Clark expedition. 

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“Sacagawea made great sacrifices that changed American history,” Haaland said. “When anyone speaks her name, it should be with great respect.”

Haaland, a member of the Pueblo of Laguna tribe in New Mexico, called Gaetz’s comments “offensive and hurtful.”

“I invite him to meet [with] me so I can share how such comments are a continuing assault on indigenous people,” she added.

In response, the Florida Republican asked if Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBen Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist Trump thanks 'vicious young Socialist Congresswomen' for his poll numbers House expected to vote Wednesday on Green's impeachment effort MORE (D-Mich.) could be invited as well.

“We’re going to go in and impeach the mothef---er,” the freshman Democrat told supporters, referring to President TrumpDonald John TrumpPompeo changes staff for Russia meeting after concerns raised about top negotiator's ties: report House unravels with rise of 'Les Enfants Terrible' Ben Carson: Trump is not a racist and his comments were not racist MORE.

"She seems to have a sophisticated understanding of non-offensive language," Gaetz said in a tweet.

The Hill has reached out to Gaetz’s office about Haaland's invitation.

Gaetz made the remark about Warren and her claims of Native American heritage during a Fox News segment Friday.

“I know the president likes to call her ‘Pocahontas,’ but now that she’s making her way from the eastern seaboard into the center of the country, maybe Sacagawea would be more appropriate,” Gaetz said. “Instead of bringing Lewis and Clark, she is bringing the most liberal policies of the Democratic Party.”

Warren, who announced her plans to form an exploratory committee to run for president, was the first prominent Democrat to enter the 2020 race.

She has long claimed to have Native American heritage and released the results of a DNA test in October which showed she had “strong evidence” of ancestry.

Haaland commended Warren for sharing the results, saying she acknowledged her Native ancestry as “testament to who we are as Americans.”

"The oppression that Native people have experienced over the course of our history caused many Native American families to deny their heritage, language, and culture, and I understand why this was the case with her family,” Haaland said in a statement.

Trump and his Republican base has not ceased his attacks on Warren, frequently using the nickname “Pocahontas.”

Gaetz defended his use of a nickname when Fox News host Melissa Francis pushed back, saying “half the world screams at you that you have made a racial slur.”

“I am simply saying that this is someone who misrepresented her heritage,” Gaetz, an outspoken Trump supporter, said. “She wanted to be forward-leaning on this element of her own biography that wasn’t accurate. It’s not about her heritage, it's about trustworthiness.”

--This report was updated on Jan. 6 at 10:38 a.m.