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Dems change House rules to allow lawmakers to wear religious headwear

The newly Democratic-controlled House overhauled a 181-year-old rule that banned hats from the floor to accommodate lawmakers who wear religious headwear.

The ban was lifted in a provision included in a rules package that the House passed in a 234-197 vote on Thursday.

The rule change to overhaul the ban on head coverings, which has reportedly been in place since 1837, now reads: “During the session of the House, a Member, Delegate, or Resident Commissioner may not wear nonreligious headdress or a hat or remain by the Clerk’s desk during the call of the roll or the counting of ballots.”

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The move also arrived the same day Congress welcomed its first two female Muslim members, Democratic Reps. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibBiden and the new Congress must protect Americans from utility shutoffs Overnight Energy: EPA rule exempts many polluting industries from future air regulations | Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report | Officials ousted from White House after papers casting doubt on climate science Ex-Michigan governor to be charged over Flint water crisis: report MORE (Mich.) and Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDemocrats poised to impeach Trump again Pence opposes removing Trump under 25th Amendment: reports Pelosi vows to impeach Trump again — if Pence doesn't remove him first MORE (Minn.).

The argument to lift the ban was proposed by Rep. Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden attends first church service as president in DC, stops at local bagel shop More hands needed on the nuclear football Sunday shows preview: All eyes on Biden administration to tackle coronavirus MORE (D-Calif.) last month and later by Rep. Jim McGovern (D-Mass.) to accommodate Omar, who is the first member of Congress to wear a religious headscarf.

Omar, who also co-authored the proposal, took to Twitter to celebrate the news on Friday. 

“Yesterday, Congress voted to lift a 181 year ban on headwear to make the #116thCongress more inclusive for all,” Omar said.

“I thank my colleagues for welcoming me, and I look forward to the day we lift the Muslim ban separating families all over the U.S. from their loved ones,” she continued.