House votes to reopen Treasury Dept., IRS

The Democratic-led House approved a bill Wednesday to reopen the Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service and Small Business Administration, among other federal agencies.

The chamber voted 240-188 to advance the measure, with eight Republicans bucking party lines to back the bill, which is the first of four bills expected to be brought to the floor by Democrats.

The Republicans who voted to advance the measure Wednesday included Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikThe Hill's Morning Report — Trump basks in acquittal; Dems eye recanvass in Iowa Trump holds White House 'celebration' for impeachment acquittal Trump on Jim Jordan: 'He's obviously very proud of his body' MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdTrump to attend California fundraiser with Oracle chairman The Hill's Morning Report - Nearing witness vote, GOP rushes to acquit Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Trump defense rests, GOP struggles to bar witnesses MORE (Texas), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonOvernight Health Care — Presented by Partnership for America's Health Care Future — Democrats seek to preempt Trump message on health care | E-cigarette executives set for grilling | Dems urge emergency funding for coronavirus Democrats slam GOP on drug prices in bilingual digital ads Lawmakers discuss how to work together in midst of impeachment fight MORE (Mich.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoTech for Nevada caucuses under scrutiny after Iowa debacle Hillicon Valley: Judge approves T-Mobile, Sprint merger | FTC to review past Big Tech deals | State officials ask for more cybersecurity help | House nears draft bill on self-driving cars Bipartisan lawmakers introduce bill to combat cyberattacks on state and local governments MORE (N.Y.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDemocrats bullish on bill to create women's history museum: 'It's an election year' This week: Trump's budget lands with a thud on Capitol Hill House approves pro-union labor bill MORE (Pa.), Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenGOP climate plan faces pushback — from Republicans Coalition plan seeks to cut carbon emissions in half by 2035 Overnight Energy: Panel gives chairman power to subpoena Interior | House passes bill to protect wilderness | House Republicans propose carbon capture bill | Ocasio-Cortez introduces bill to ban fracking MORE (Ore.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerPentagon exodus extends 'concerning,' 'baffling' trend of acting officials in key roles Republican group asks 'what is Trump hiding' in Times Square billboard Koch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill MORE (Ill.) and Herrera Beutler (Wash.).

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Senate Republicans assert they will not take up any spending legislation to end the partial shutdown unless President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussian sanctions will boomerang States, cities rethink tax incentives after Amazon HQ2 backlash A Presidents Day perspective on the nature of a free press MORE has agreed to sign it.

The odds of a shutdown ending anytime soon appeared to worsen on Wednesday, with Trump and Democratic leaders ripping each other after a meeting at the White House ended abruptly.

Trump said Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiMalaysia says it will choose 5G partners based on own standards, not US recommendations Pelosi warns allies against using Huawei Budget hawks frustrated by 2020 politics in entitlement reform fight MORE (D-Calif.) refused to consider his demand for money to fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, a major sticking point in negotiations.

Democrats stressed on the 19th day of the shutdown that they will not support any legislation that provides the $5.7 billion requested by Trump for the border barrier.

Trump has repeatedly said he won’t sign any spending bill to reopen about 25 percent of the federal government unless it provides the wall funding.

Democratic leaders have called on the president to support legislation to reopen other areas of the government ahead of attempting to tackle funding for the Department of Homeland Security.

Top Democrats argue Republicans are holding the government hostage over the border wall while Republicans allege Democrats are playing politics and failing to negotiate in good faith.

Democrats saw a slight uptick in Republican members willing to support a clean bill after just seven GOP lawmakers voted last week in favor of a spending package aimed at funding the bulk of the remaining agencies through the end of the fiscal year and five Republican members voting in favor of a continuing resolution to fund DHS through Feb. 8.