House votes to reopen Treasury Dept., IRS

The Democratic-led House approved a bill Wednesday to reopen the Treasury Department, Internal Revenue Service and Small Business Administration, among other federal agencies.

The chamber voted 240-188 to advance the measure, with eight Republicans bucking party lines to back the bill, which is the first of four bills expected to be brought to the floor by Democrats.

The Republicans who voted to advance the measure Wednesday included Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikKoch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill Lawmakers introduce bipartisan bill to allow new parents to advance tax credits CNN's Bianna Golodryga: 'Rumblings' from Democrats on censuring Trump instead of impeachment MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdCongressional Hispanic Caucus campaign arm endorses two Texas Democrats Group of veterans call on lawmakers to support impeachment, 'put country over politics' CNN's Bianna Golodryga: 'Rumblings' from Democrats on censuring Trump instead of impeachment MORE (Texas), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonConservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Shimkus says he's reconsidering retirement Shimkus says he's been asked to reconsider retirement MORE (Mich.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoConservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' House GOP criticizes impeachment drive as distracting from national security issues Progressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements MORE (N.Y.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDemocrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by AdvaMed — House panel delays impeachment vote until Friday Koch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill MORE (Pa.), Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenOvernight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Turf war derails push on surprise medical bills | Bill would tax e-cigarettes to pay for anti-vaping campaign | .5M ad blitz backs vulnerable Dems on drug prices Turf war derails bipartisan push on surprise medical bills Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' MORE (Ore.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerKoch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill Conservative group hits White House with billboard ads: 'What is Trump hiding?' Lawmakers spar over surveillance flight treaty with Russia MORE (Ill.) and Herrera Beutler (Wash.).

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Senate Republicans assert they will not take up any spending legislation to end the partial shutdown unless President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE has agreed to sign it.

The odds of a shutdown ending anytime soon appeared to worsen on Wednesday, with Trump and Democratic leaders ripping each other after a meeting at the White House ended abruptly.

Trump said Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiTrump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Sherrod Brown backs new North American trade deal: 'This will be the first trade agreement I've ever voted for' Overnight Health Care — Presented by That's Medicaid — Turf war derails push on surprise medical bills | Bill would tax e-cigarettes to pay for anti-vaping campaign | .5M ad blitz backs vulnerable Dems on drug prices MORE (D-Calif.) refused to consider his demand for money to fund construction of a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border, a major sticking point in negotiations.

Democrats stressed on the 19th day of the shutdown that they will not support any legislation that provides the $5.7 billion requested by Trump for the border barrier.

Trump has repeatedly said he won’t sign any spending bill to reopen about 25 percent of the federal government unless it provides the wall funding.

Democratic leaders have called on the president to support legislation to reopen other areas of the government ahead of attempting to tackle funding for the Department of Homeland Security.

Top Democrats argue Republicans are holding the government hostage over the border wall while Republicans allege Democrats are playing politics and failing to negotiate in good faith.

Democrats saw a slight uptick in Republican members willing to support a clean bill after just seven GOP lawmakers voted last week in favor of a spending package aimed at funding the bulk of the remaining agencies through the end of the fiscal year and five Republican members voting in favor of a continuing resolution to fund DHS through Feb. 8.