GOP lawmaker: Steve King's 'embrace of racism' has no place in Congress

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashThe Hill's Morning Report - Pompeo condemns Iran for 'act of war' while Trump moves with caution Trump's 'soldier of fortune' foreign policy Amash: 'Bolton never should have been hired' MORE (Mich.) on Thursday condemned fellow Republican Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingOcasio-Cortez rips Steve King after he shares video drinking from toilet-fountain hybrid at border Steve King says he drank from toilet at detention center Steve King jokes about China forcing Muslims to eat pork MORE (Iowa) for comments questioning why terms like "white nationalist" and "white supremacist" were offensive, calling them "an embrace of racism."

"This is an embrace of racism, and it has no place in Congress or anywhere," Amash tweeted shortly after King's comments surfaced. 

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“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” King asked in an interview with The New York Times published Thursday. “Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?”

The comments were made in a report on King's hard-line views on immigration. King, responding to the story later in the day, said that he is not a white supremacist or white nationalist, but called himself a "nationalist."

The statement prompted backlash from a number of journalists, commentators and lawmakers. 

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOvernight Defense: Trump says he has 'many options' on Iran | Hostage negotiator chosen for national security adviser | Senate Dems block funding bill | Documents show Pentagon spent at least 4K at Trump's Scotland resort Liz Cheney calls for 'proportional military response' against Iran Liz Cheney says world is more stable, 'safer' under Trump MORE (R-Wyo.) called the comments "abhorrent and racist."

Rep. Paul MitchellPaul MitchellGOP struggles with retirement wave Here are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Iowa GOP chair calls Steve King's rape, incest comments 'outrageous' MORE (R-Mich.) said that King's "embrace of these terms and philosophies are fundamentally wrong and offensive and have no place in Congress, our nation, or anywhere."

Conservative commentator Ben Shapiro, meanwhile, called on Congress to censure King. 

"And then he ought to be primaried ASAP," he said. 

Rep. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanWilliamson: Climate change result of an 'amoral' economic system Overnight Energy: Top presidential candidates to skip second climate forum | Group sues for info on 'attempts to politicize' NOAA | Trump allows use of oil reserve after Saudi attacks Five top 2020 Democrats haven't committed to MSNBC climate forum MORE (D-Ohio) also urged the House to censure King for his "racist remarks."

"These remarks should also be repudiated by Republican Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyAmerica's newest comedy troupe: House GOP Pelosi unveils signature plan to lower drug prices Modernize Congress to make it work for the people MORE and all of Rep. King's colleagues," Ryan added. "Support for white supremacist ideology should have no place in Congress."

King's office did not immediately respond to a request for comment from The Hill. 

King has drawn scrutiny over his comments about subjects such as immigration in the past. He once tweeted that diversity is not America's strength

“Assimilation has become a dirty word to the multiculturalist Left. Assimilation, not diversity, is our American strength,” he said on Twitter in December 2017. 

In 2018, he defended his association with a far-right Austrian group with links to the Nazi party and his views on immigration, saying that “if they were in America ... they would be Republicans."

His public comments prompted a number of corporations last year to stop making campaign contributions to the congressman.  

King beat his Democratic challenger, J.D. Scholten, by 3 percentage points in November's midterm elections. King has been in Congress since 2003.

King will face new obstacles in the next election. Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced on Wednesday that he would challenge King for his northwest Iowa House seat in 2020. 

His announcement was followed by Iowa Gov. Kim Reynolds (R) saying she would not endorse King for reelection. 

"The last election was a wake-up call for it to be that close," Reynolds told the local TV station.

Updated at 2:19 p.m.