House passes bills to fund Transportation Dept., HUD, Agriculture

The Democratic-led House passed a standalone spending measure Thursday to provide funding for the Departments of Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and other agencies.

The House voted 244-180 to approve the clean funding measure. Twelve Republicans bucked party lines to join Democrats in voting for the bill on the floor.

The chamber then voted 243-183 to pass a separate measure to fund the Department of Agriculture and related agencies through Sept. 30, with 10 Republicans joining Democrats to vote for the measure.

That bill would also allocate funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), a top priority for lawmakers concerned that millions of Americans could lose access to food stamp benefits after temporary funding provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture runs out at the end of February.

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The lower chamber is expected to vote on its final standalone spending bill to fund the Department of the Interior and the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday.

Passage of the measures Thursday come on the 20th day of the partial government shutdown, with no clear path forward to reopen agencies as negotiators remain in a stalemate over President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump rails against impeachment in speech to Texas farmers Trump administration planning to crack down on 'birth tourism': report George Conway on Trump adding Dershowitz, Starr to legal team: 'Hard to see how either could help' MORE’s demand for border wall funding.

Trump, who is requesting $5.7 billion for border security, has vowed not to sign any legislation that doesn’t provide funding for his proposed barrier. He delivered a prime-time address Tuesday and was traveling to a border town in Texas on Thursday to make the case for getting the money.

Top Democrats have repeatedly said they will not comply with the administration's demands for wall funding.

The 12 Republicans who voted for the Transportation bill Thursday is an uptick from the eight who voted the previous day on a measure to reopen the IRS, Treasury Department and other federal agencies.

GOP Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingLawmakers introduce bill taxing e-cigarettes to pay for anti-vaping campaigns Democrat who opposed Trump, Clinton impeachment inquiries faces big test House GOP criticizes impeachment drive as distracting from national security issues MORE (N.Y.), Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisBoth sides of the aisle call for local, state, federal cooperation on homelessness Voting equipment companies throw weight behind enhanced disclosures Voting machine vendors to testify on election security MORE (Ill.), Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversKoch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill Waters clashes with Trump officials over 'disastrous' housing plans Financial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more MORE (Ohio) and Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithHouse votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap GOP lawmaker to offer bill to create universal charitable deduction on 'Giving Tuesday' China threatens 'strong countermeasures' if Congress passes Hong Kong legislation MORE (N.J.) joined with others Republicans to advance the latest measure, including Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikLawmakers push back at Pentagon's possible Africa drawdown Overnight Energy: Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel | GOP lawmakers push back on bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners | Green groups sue Trump over California fracking plans Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse Democrats launch effort to register minority voters in key districts Hurd says Democrats, media are being manipulated by Iran Bottom Line MORE (Texas), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonThe rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2019 The Memo: Impeachment's scars cut deep with Trump, say those who know him Hillary Clinton defends Dingell as 'everything that Trump is not' MORE (Mich.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHouse Democrats request briefings on Iranian cyber threats from DHS, FCC US officials, lawmakers warn of potential Iranian cyberattacks House votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap MORE (N.Y.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickFormer Pennsylvania Rep. Fitzpatrick dead at 56 Republicans came to the table on climate this year The rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2019 MORE (Pa.), Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenConservative groups aim to sink bipartisan fix to 'surprise' medical bills Overnight Energy: Schumer votes against USMCA, citing climate impact | Republicans offer details on their environmental proposals | Microsoft aims to be carbon negative by 2030 Republicans offer details on environmental proposals after Democrats roll out plan MORE (Ore.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerPentagon exodus extends 'concerning,' 'baffling' trend of acting officials in key roles Republican group asks 'what is Trump hiding' in Times Square billboard Koch campaign touts bipartisan group behind ag labor immigration bill MORE (Ill.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDemocrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by AdvaMed — House panel delays impeachment vote until Friday House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices MORE (Wash.). All twelve received fewer than 60 percent of the vote in the 2018 midterm elections. Stivers served as chairman of the House GOP campaign arm in the 2018 cycle. 

House Democrats crafted a strategy to pass four individual funding bills aimed at reopening various unfunded parts of the government in an attempt to pressure Senate Republicans, who have said they will not take up spending bills that don’t have Trump’s approval.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellDemocrats worry a speedy impeachment trial will shut out public George Conway group drops ad seeking to remind GOP senators of their 'sworn oaths' ahead of impeachment trial GOP senator 'open' to impeachment witnesses 'within the scope' of articles MORE (R-Ky.) earlier Thursday blocked two House-passed funding bills that would reopen the federal government. One would fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through Feb. 8, and a separate package would have funded the remaining agencies without current-year appropriations through Sept. 30.

Democratic leaders are looking to peel off GOP lawmakers from standing with Trump on the shutdown. Democrats pushed Republicans to vote for the House bills Thursday as they contain identical language to what passed out of the Senate Appropriations Committee with overwhelming bipartisan support.

Democrats have also accused Republicans of holding government funding hostage over partisan priorities, calling on the president to support spending bills that reopen portions of the government before they discuss the wall.

While a handful of moderate GOP members backed the Democrat-introduced measures on the floor, top Republicans have expressed confidence that the conference will largely remain unified in supporting the president’s fight for the wall.

Top Republicans have alleged Democratic negotiators are playing politics and have failed to produce a counteroffer to the president. House GOP leaders and administration officials have been urging members to continue to support the president, arguing the clean bills brought to the floor are “show votes” that won’t solve the issue at hand.

– Niv Elis contributed to this story, which was updated at 4:45 p.m.