House passes bills to fund Transportation Dept., HUD, Agriculture

The Democratic-led House passed a standalone spending measure Thursday to provide funding for the Departments of Transportation, Housing and Urban Development, and other agencies.

The House voted 244-180 to approve the clean funding measure. Twelve Republicans bucked party lines to join Democrats in voting for the bill on the floor.

The chamber then voted 243-183 to pass a separate measure to fund the Department of Agriculture and related agencies through Sept. 30, with 10 Republicans joining Democrats to vote for the measure.

That bill would also allocate funding for the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program (SNAP), a top priority for lawmakers concerned that millions of Americans could lose access to food stamp benefits after temporary funding provided by the U.S. Department of Agriculture runs out at the end of February.

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The lower chamber is expected to vote on its final standalone spending bill to fund the Department of the Interior and the Environmental Protection Agency on Friday.

Passage of the measures Thursday come on the 20th day of the partial government shutdown, with no clear path forward to reopen agencies as negotiators remain in a stalemate over President TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE’s demand for border wall funding.

Trump, who is requesting $5.7 billion for border security, has vowed not to sign any legislation that doesn’t provide funding for his proposed barrier. He delivered a prime-time address Tuesday and was traveling to a border town in Texas on Thursday to make the case for getting the money.

Top Democrats have repeatedly said they will not comply with the administration's demands for wall funding.

The 12 Republicans who voted for the Transportation bill Thursday is an uptick from the eight who voted the previous day on a measure to reopen the IRS, Treasury Department and other federal agencies.

GOP Reps. Pete KingPeter (Pete) Thomas KingGOP lawmakers blast Trump's Syria decision as 'grave mistake,' 'disaster in the making' Here are the Democrats who aren't co-sponsoring an assault weapons ban Hotel industry mounts attack on Airbnb with House bill MORE (N.Y.), Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisGOP lawmaker: We're past point of doing separate infrastructure bill The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by National Association of Manufacturers - Trump, Congress draw battle lines on impeachment Lawmakers beat Capitol Police in Congressional Football Game MORE (Ill.), Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversFinancial sector's work on SAFE Banking Act shows together, everyone achieves more GOP ratchets up 2020 attacks as impeachment storm grows Let's improve state and federal regulation of bank vendors MORE (Ohio) and Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithNancy Pelosi is ready for this fight House approves Democrat-backed bill ending mandatory arbitration US meddling in Hong Kong could trigger a tragedy MORE (N.J.) joined with others Republicans to advance the latest measure, including Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikCheney slated to introduce bill to place sanctions on Turkey Conservative lawmakers demand Schiff's recusal from Trump impeachment inquiry Bipartisan lawmakers who visited Syrian border slam Trump's 'rash decision' MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdDemocrats claim new momentum from intelligence watchdog testimony Romney: Trump requesting Biden investigation from China, Ukraine 'wrong and appalling' GOP lawmaker: 'It is terrible' for Trump to call on China to probe Biden MORE (Texas), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonGOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine House passes bill to revamp medical screenings for migrants at border Energy efficiency cannot be a partisan issue for Washington MORE (Mich.), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHacker conference report details persistent vulnerabilities to US voting systems Hillicon Valley: Senate passes bill to boost cyber help for agencies, businesses | Watchdog warns Energy Department failing to protect grid | FTC sues Match for allegedly conning users Senate approves bill to boost cyber assistance for federal agencies, private sector MORE (N.Y.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena MORE (Pa.), Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenCBO: Pelosi bill to lower drug prices saves Medicare 5 billion Trump official declines to testify on trade protections for tech platforms House panel asks Trump trade official to testify on legal protections for tech platforms MORE (Ore.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerWhite House officials stand by Syria withdrawal, sanctions delay amid bipartisan pushback Sunday shows — Officials rush to Trump's defense on Syria, sanctions GOP congressman: 'We all know' Turkey wouldn't have attacked if U.S. troops remained at border MORE (Ill.) and Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerGOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine Dems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances MORE (Wash.). All twelve received fewer than 60 percent of the vote in the 2018 midterm elections. Stivers served as chairman of the House GOP campaign arm in the 2018 cycle. 

House Democrats crafted a strategy to pass four individual funding bills aimed at reopening various unfunded parts of the government in an attempt to pressure Senate Republicans, who have said they will not take up spending bills that don’t have Trump’s approval.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Republicans wrestle with impeachment strategy Mattis warns 'ISIS will resurge' without U.S. pressure on Syria MORE (R-Ky.) earlier Thursday blocked two House-passed funding bills that would reopen the federal government. One would fund the Department of Homeland Security (DHS) through Feb. 8, and a separate package would have funded the remaining agencies without current-year appropriations through Sept. 30.

Democratic leaders are looking to peel off GOP lawmakers from standing with Trump on the shutdown. Democrats pushed Republicans to vote for the House bills Thursday as they contain identical language to what passed out of the Senate Appropriations Committee with overwhelming bipartisan support.

Democrats have also accused Republicans of holding government funding hostage over partisan priorities, calling on the president to support spending bills that reopen portions of the government before they discuss the wall.

While a handful of moderate GOP members backed the Democrat-introduced measures on the floor, top Republicans have expressed confidence that the conference will largely remain unified in supporting the president’s fight for the wall.

Top Republicans have alleged Democratic negotiators are playing politics and have failed to produce a counteroffer to the president. House GOP leaders and administration officials have been urging members to continue to support the president, arguing the clean bills brought to the floor are “show votes” that won’t solve the issue at hand.

– Niv Elis contributed to this story, which was updated at 4:45 p.m.