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House votes to reopen Interior, EPA as shutdown fight wages on

The House approved legislation that would fund and reopen the Interior Department, Environmental Protection Agency and Forest Service in an 240-179 vote on Friday, the latest effort by Democrats to put pressure on Republicans and President TrumpDonald TrumpWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' More than 75 Asian, LGBTQ groups oppose anti-Asian crime bill McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal MORE to end the partial shutdown.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the measure.

It’s the fourth measure approved by the Democratic-controlled House this week. Democrats are voting on a series of bills to open up the parts of the government closed since Dec. 22, which has left about 800,000 federal workers furloughed or working without pay.

Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden says Beau's assessment of first 100 days would be 'Be who you are' McConnell says he's 'great admirer' of Liz Cheney but mum on her removal McConnell: 'Good chance' of deal with Biden on infrastructure MORE (R-Ky.) has said he will not bring any of the bills up to a vote in the Senate until there is a deal between Trump and Democrats on the president’s demand for border wall funding.

The Republicans voting for the bill on Friday were Reps. Rodney DavisRodney Lee DavisWatchdog finds Architect of the Capitol was sidelined from security planning ahead of Jan. 6 Capitol Police watchdog calls for boosting countersurveillance House Republicans request hearing with Capitol Police Board for first time since 1945 MORE (Ill.), Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickAmerica's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do Biden visits local Mexican restaurant to highlight relief program Police reform talks ramp up amid pressure from Biden, families MORE (Pa.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Uninvited Trump is specter at GOP retreat McCarthy defends Trump response to deadly Jan. 6 riot MORE (Wash.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Congress drawn into pipeline cyberattack, violence in Israel Pence autobiography coming from Simon & Schuster Prince Harry joins Aspen Institute commission on misinformation MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHouse lawmakers roll out bill to invest 0 million in state and local cybersecurity Pentagon removing Chinese tech giant from blacklist after court loss Hillicon Valley: Feds eye more oversight of pipelines after Colonial attack | White House monitoring fuel shortages | Democrats urge Facebook to reverse WhatsApp update | Biden announces deal with Uber, Lyft for free vaccine rides MORE (N.Y.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerTrump critics push new direction for GOP Democrats fundraise off of vote to remove Cheney from GOP leadership Kinzinger on Cheney removal: History will call this 'low point of the Republican Party' MORE (Ill.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Biden delivers 100 million shots in 58 days, doses to neighbors The eight Republicans who voted to tighten background checks on guns House approves bills tightening background checks on guns MORE (N.J.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWarren says Republican party 'eating itself and it is discovering that the meal is poisonous' Roy won't rule out challenging Stefanik for GOP House Conference seat Cheney to any Trump-backed challenger: 'Bring it on' MORE (N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonCheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women Overnight Energy: Michigan reps reintroduce measure for national 'forever chemicals' standard |  White House says gas tax won't be part of infrastructure bill Mark Ruffalo joins bipartisan lawmakers in introducing chemical regulation bill MORE (Mich.) and Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenLobbying world Give Republicans the climate credit they deserve Fox hires former GOP lawmaker Greg Walden as political consultant MORE (Ore.). 

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Trump is edging closer to declaring a national emergency to circumvent Congress and build a wall, a step that could start a court fight with Democrats.

Negotiations between the two sides have not been fruitful. Trump stormed out of a Wednesday meeting at the White House and called it a “total waste of time.”

The shutdown will become the longest in U.S. history on Saturday.

In their comments on the floor ahead of the vote, both sides dug in hard.

“Trump articulated at the White House that he would not open government until we agreed with doing what he wanted to do. That is not democracy, that's despotism,” said House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerWhat's a party caucus chair worth? House fails to pass drug bill amid Jan. 6 tensions Cheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP MORE (D-Md.).

He also noted that the bills being brought to the Senate floor had passed out of the Senate Appropriations Committee with bipartisan support.

Republican leaders — who have placed a full-court press on their conference to remain unified in standing with the president — argue Democrats have failed to take negotiations seriously.

“The far left wing of Pelosi's conference has pulled her away from being able to reach any kind of agreement, and that's a shame because we are seeing more and more Democrats now on their side say that they really need to try to solve this problem,” House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseFreedom Caucus Republican says Cheney was 'canceled' Stefanik formally launches bid to replace Cheney in House GOP leadership GOP votes to dump Cheney from leadership MORE (R-La.) told reporters Thursday, referring to Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Inflation jumps at fastest pace since 2008 | Biden 'encouraged' on bipartisan infrastructure deal Overnight Health Care: CDC approves Pfizer vaccine for adolescents aged 12-15 | House moderates signal concerns with Pelosi drug pricing bill | Panel blasts COVID-19 response Biden 'encouraged' by meeting with congressional leaders on infrastructure MORE (D-Calif.).

“So hopefully that continues to bill to push Pelosi in a position where she actually has to negotiate in good faith and put a real offer on the table.”

The House passed two spending bills — one to provide funding for the departments of Transportation and of Housing and Urban Development, as well as other agencies, and another to fund the Department of Agriculture and related agencies and allocate funds to the Supplemental Nutrition Assistance Program — with the support of 12 GOP lawmakers on Thursday. On Wednesday, the lower chamber approved a bill to reopen the Treasury Department, IRS and Small Business Administration, among other federal agencies, with the help of eight Republicans.