Congressional Black Caucus calls for Steve King to be removed from committees

Congressional Black Caucus calls for Steve King to be removed from committees
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The Congressional Black Caucus (CBC) called for Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingJuan Williams: Stephen Miller must be fired Why the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy MSNBC's Donny Deutsch: 'Pathetic' Republicans who stormed closed hearing are 'boring, nerdy-looking white guys' MORE (R-Iowa) to be removed from his committee assignments Saturday after remarks he made about white supremacy earlier this week.

CBC chairwoman Rep. Karen BassKaren Ruth BassThe US treats asylum seekers so poorly Lawmakers visit African migrants at US-Mexico border Preventative measures are needed in child welfare policy, data shows MORE (D-Calif.) linked King's comments to President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrumps light 97th annual National Christmas Tree Trump to hold campaign rally in Michigan 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments MORE and asked for him to be deposed.

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“Like Donald Trump,” she said, “Steve King has sought again and again to give comfort to white supremacists, something that should never be allowed in the halls of Congress or the Oval Office."

Bass characterized King's remarks as "racist" and the Iowa Republican needed more than just condemnation.

“If Republicans really believe these racist statements have no place in our government, then their party must offer more than shallow temporary statements of condemnation. Instead, they must actually condemn Mr. King by removing him from his committee assignments so that he can no longer affect policies that impact the very people he has made it clear he disdains."

"Anything less than these substantive actions is another tacit acceptance of racism from the Republican party,” Bass added.

King experienced amplified blowback after comments he made in a Thursday interview with The New York Times where he questioned why terms like "white supremacist" have been deemed racist.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive?” he asked in the Times interview.

King attempted to defuse the controversy on Friday, saying on the House floor that he regrets “the heartburn” his remarks have caused in Congress and Iowa.

The comments have received bipartisan backlash over the last few days.

Both of Iowa's Republican senators, Chuck GrassleyCharles (Chuck) Ernest GrassleyHouse to vote next week on sweeping bill to lower drug prices Trump escalates fight over tax on tech giants Falling impeachment support raises pressure for Democrats on trade MORE and Joni ErnstJoni Kay ErnstGiffords, Demand Justice to pressure GOP senators to reject Trump judicial pick Democratic challenger to Joni Ernst releases ad depicting her as firing gun at him Republicans raise concerns over Trump pardoning service members MOREcondemned the questions as "offensive."

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Pelosi 'Don't mess with Mama': Pelosi's daughter tweets support following press conference comments Bloomberg: Trump should be impeached On The Money: Congress races to beat deadline on shutdown | Trump asks Supreme Court to shield financial records from House Democrats | House passes bill to explicitly ban insider trading MORE (D-Calif.) suggested that some punitive action may be taken against King for the remarks.