GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'

GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'
© Greg Nash

The third-ranking House Republican said Tuesday that Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingYoung Turks reporter tricks Steve King into tweeting about 'A Few Good Men' villain Holocaust survivor who offered to tour Auschwitz with Ocasio-Cortez calls for her to 'be removed from Congress' Liz Cheney hits back at Ocasio-Cortez over concentration camp comments: 'This isn't model Congress' MORE (R-Iowa) should "find another line of work" after his comments questioning why the terms "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" had become offensive.

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyLiz Cheney calls Ayanna Pressley's comments at Netroots Nation 'racist' Lawmakers introduce bill to block U.S. companies from doing business with Huawei Cheney blasts Ocasio-Cortez over DHS dissolution MORE (R-Wyo.), the House GOP conference chairwoman, suggested King should leave after GOP leaders moved Monday night to strip him of all committee assignments for the new Congress.

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Cheney echoed a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants GOP rattled by Trump rally Third Kentucky Democrat announces challenge to McConnell MORE (R-Ky.) the day before, who said: "Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position. If he doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work."

When asked if King should resign, Cheney told reporters at a press conference: "I agree with Leader McConnell, actually. I think he should find another line of work."

"His language questioning whether or not the notion of white supremacy is offensive is absolutely abhorrent, it's racist. We do not support it or agree with it," Cheney said.

Two other Republicans have also called for King to resign: Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGOP rattled by Trump rally Romney: 'Send her back' chants 'offensive,' 'unfortunate' for GOP Trump's no racist — he's an equal opportunity offender MORE (R-Utah), the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, and Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartHouse gears up for Mueller testimony House Intel Republican: 'Foolish' not to take info on opponent from foreign ally 58 GOP lawmakers vote against disaster aid bill MORE (R-Utah).

Cheney went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants History in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (R-Calif.), who declined to say if King should resign.

"I think that's up to Steve King. The voters have elected him. The House Republicans denounce his language," McCarthy said.

McCarthy further declined to say if the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) would support a primary challenge against King. The NRCC historically does not get involved in GOP primaries.

"This is still early about whether Steve King is even running for reelection again," McCarthy said. "Steve King can make that decision, but that decision will come down to his own voters."

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King last week. Another Republican, Bret Richards, told the Des Moines Register last week that he also plans to run against King.

-Updated 11:12 a.m.