GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'

GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'
© Greg Nash

The third-ranking House Republican said Tuesday that Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingGOP leader: 'There is no place for QAnon in the Republican Party' Loomer win creates bigger problem for House GOP Win by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP MORE (R-Iowa) should "find another line of work" after his comments questioning why the terms "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" had become offensive.

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Cheney asks DOJ to probe environmental groups | Kudlow: 'No sector worse hurt than energy' during pandemic | Trump pledges 'no politics' in Pebble Mine review Cheney asks DOJ to probe environmental groups  Press: The big no-show at the RNC MORE (R-Wyo.), the House GOP conference chairwoman, suggested King should leave after GOP leaders moved Monday night to strip him of all committee assignments for the new Congress.

ADVERTISEMENT

Cheney echoed a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellObama calls on Senate not to fill Ginsburg's vacancy until after election Planned Parenthood: 'The fate of our rights' depends on Ginsburg replacement Progressive group to spend M in ad campaign on Supreme Court vacancy MORE (R-Ky.) the day before, who said: "Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position. If he doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work."

When asked if King should resign, Cheney told reporters at a press conference: "I agree with Leader McConnell, actually. I think he should find another line of work."

"His language questioning whether or not the notion of white supremacy is offensive is absolutely abhorrent, it's racist. We do not support it or agree with it," Cheney said.

Two other Republicans have also called for King to resign: Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneySenate Republicans face tough decision on replacing Ginsburg McConnell says Trump nominee to replace Ginsburg will get Senate vote GOP-led panel to hear from former official who said Burisma was not a factor in US policy MORE (R-Utah), the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, and Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartAtlanta Wendy's 911 call the night of Rayshard Brooks's death released Tyler Perry offers to pay for funeral of Rayshard Brooks Current, former NHL players form diversity coalition to fight intolerance in hockey MORE (R-Utah).

Cheney went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump asked Chamber of Commerce to reconsider Democratic endorsements: report The Hill's Morning Report - Sponsored by The Air Line Pilots Association - White House moves closer to Pelosi on virus relief bill Trump's sharp words put CDC director on hot seat MORE (R-Calif.), who declined to say if King should resign.

"I think that's up to Steve King. The voters have elected him. The House Republicans denounce his language," McCarthy said.

McCarthy further declined to say if the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) would support a primary challenge against King. The NRCC historically does not get involved in GOP primaries.

"This is still early about whether Steve King is even running for reelection again," McCarthy said. "Steve King can make that decision, but that decision will come down to his own voters."

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King last week. Another Republican, Bret Richards, told the Des Moines Register last week that he also plans to run against King.

-Updated 11:12 a.m.