GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'

GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'
© Greg Nash

The third-ranking House Republican said Tuesday that Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingWhy the GOP march of mad hatters poses a threat to our Democracy MSNBC's Donny Deutsch: 'Pathetic' Republicans who stormed closed hearing are 'boring, nerdy-looking white guys' Overnight Defense: Trump lifts sanctions on Turkey | 'Small number' of troops to remain by Syrian oil fields | Defense official's impeachment testimony delayed five hours after Republicans storm secure room MORE (R-Iowa) should "find another line of work" after his comments questioning why the terms "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" had become offensive.

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyOvernight Energy: Senate eyes nixing 'forever chemicals' fix from defense bill | Former Obama EPA chief named CEO of green group | Senate reviews Interior, FERC nominees criticized on ethics Liz Cheney applauds Trump for pulling out of Paris climate agreement Liz Cheney to introduce legislation preventing Trump administration from renewing Iran sanctions waivers MORE (R-Wyo.), the House GOP conference chairwoman, suggested King should leave after GOP leaders moved Monday night to strip him of all committee assignments for the new Congress.

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Cheney echoed a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Progressive veterans group launches campaign labeling Trump as a 'national security threat' GOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week MORE (R-Ky.) the day before, who said: "Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position. If he doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work."

When asked if King should resign, Cheney told reporters at a press conference: "I agree with Leader McConnell, actually. I think he should find another line of work."

"His language questioning whether or not the notion of white supremacy is offensive is absolutely abhorrent, it's racist. We do not support it or agree with it," Cheney said.

Two other Republicans have also called for King to resign: Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Falling investment revives attacks against Trump's tax cuts GOP senators plan to tune out impeachment week MORE (R-Utah), the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, and Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartIt's time for Congress to establish a national mental health crisis number Republicans storm closed-door hearing to protest impeachment inquiry Diplomat says Ukraine aid was tied to political investigations MORE (R-Utah).

Cheney went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThis week: House kicks off public phase of impeachment inquiry Nunes pressed on Fox News about comparing impeachment inquiry to a 'coup' Vaping illness spurs calls for federal marijuana changes MORE (R-Calif.), who declined to say if King should resign.

"I think that's up to Steve King. The voters have elected him. The House Republicans denounce his language," McCarthy said.

McCarthy further declined to say if the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) would support a primary challenge against King. The NRCC historically does not get involved in GOP primaries.

"This is still early about whether Steve King is even running for reelection again," McCarthy said. "Steve King can make that decision, but that decision will come down to his own voters."

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King last week. Another Republican, Bret Richards, told the Des Moines Register last week that he also plans to run against King.

-Updated 11:12 a.m.