GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'

GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'
© Greg Nash

The third-ranking House Republican said Tuesday that Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingTrump stokes Dems' anti-Semitism spat ahead of 2020 The Hill's Morning Report - Dems look to rebuild 'blue wall' Sarah Sanders won't say if Trump believes Dems hate Jews MORE (R-Iowa) should "find another line of work" after his comments questioning why the terms "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" had become offensive.

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyGOP lawmakers: House leaders already jockeying for leadership contests Pentagon: Trump's 'cost plus 50' plan hasn't been discussed with Europe Liz Cheney: Dems are 'enabling anti-Semitism' MORE (R-Wyo.), the House GOP conference chairwoman, suggested King should leave after GOP leaders moved Monday night to strip him of all committee assignments for the new Congress.

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Cheney echoed a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellRepublicans up for reelection fear daylight with Trump Overnight Energy: Students around globe demand climate action | EPA bans consumer sales of deadly chemical in paint strippers | Green New Deal set for Senate vote The Hill's Morning Report — Trump readies first veto after latest clash with Senate GOP MORE (R-Ky.) the day before, who said: "Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position. If he doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work."

When asked if King should resign, Cheney told reporters at a press conference: "I agree with Leader McConnell, actually. I think he should find another line of work."

"His language questioning whether or not the notion of white supremacy is offensive is absolutely abhorrent, it's racist. We do not support it or agree with it," Cheney said.

Two other Republicans have also called for King to resign: Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe 25 Republicans who defied Trump on emergency declaration Overnight Defense: Senate rejects border emergency in rebuke to Trump | Acting Pentagon chief grilled on wall funding | Warren confronts chief over war fund budget 12 Republican senators defy Trump on emergency declaration  MORE (R-Utah), the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, and Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartDems fear Trump is looking at presidential pardons House passes series of measures hitting Russia, Putin House Intel obtains new info, documents from Cohen in 8-hour interview MORE (R-Utah).

Cheney went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOvernight Energy: McConnell tees up vote on Green New Deal | Centrist Dems pitch alternative to plan | House Republican likens Green New Deal to genocide | Coca-Cola reveals it uses 3M tons of plastic every year House GOP lawmaker says Green New Deal is like genocide GOP lawmakers: House leaders already jockeying for leadership contests MORE (R-Calif.), who declined to say if King should resign.

"I think that's up to Steve King. The voters have elected him. The House Republicans denounce his language," McCarthy said.

McCarthy further declined to say if the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) would support a primary challenge against King. The NRCC historically does not get involved in GOP primaries.

"This is still early about whether Steve King is even running for reelection again," McCarthy said. "Steve King can make that decision, but that decision will come down to his own voters."

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King last week. Another Republican, Bret Richards, told the Des Moines Register last week that he also plans to run against King.

-Updated 11:12 a.m.