GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'

GOP conference chair: King should 'find another line of work'
© Greg Nash

The third-ranking House Republican said Tuesday that Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingOcasio-Cortez rips Steve King after he shares video drinking from toilet-fountain hybrid at border Steve King says he drank from toilet at detention center Steve King jokes about China forcing Muslims to eat pork MORE (R-Iowa) should "find another line of work" after his comments questioning why the terms "white supremacist" and "white nationalist" had become offensive.

Rep. Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyLiz Cheney says world is more stable, 'safer' under Trump Sunday shows preview: Democratic candidates make the rounds after debate Overnight Defense: Afghanistan tops foreign policy issues at Dem debate | Erdogan says he'll discuss missile sale with Trump | US again challenges Beijing's claim to South China Sea MORE (R-Wyo.), the House GOP conference chairwoman, suggested King should leave after GOP leaders moved Monday night to strip him of all committee assignments for the new Congress.

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Cheney echoed a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellThe Hill's 12:30 Report: NY Times story sparks new firestorm over Kavanaugh Senator asked FBI to follow up on new information about Kavanaugh last year Congress must reinstate assault weapons ban MORE (R-Ky.) the day before, who said: "Rep. King's statements are unwelcome and unworthy of his elected position. If he doesn't understand why 'white supremacy' is offensive, he should find another line of work."

When asked if King should resign, Cheney told reporters at a press conference: "I agree with Leader McConnell, actually. I think he should find another line of work."

"His language questioning whether or not the notion of white supremacy is offensive is absolutely abhorrent, it's racist. We do not support it or agree with it," Cheney said.

Two other Republicans have also called for King to resign: Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump takes 2020 roadshow to New Mexico The 13 Republicans needed to pass gun-control legislation Bolton returns to political group after exiting administration MORE (R-Utah), the 2012 GOP presidential nominee, and Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartMoulton, Stewart pen op-ed backing three-digit suicide prevention hotline FCC proposes new 3-digit suicide prevention hotline number GOP lawmaker's town hall erupts in shouting over mass shootings, Trump MORE (R-Utah).

Cheney went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyTrump touts Washington Post story on GOP support Pence extends olive branch to Cummings after Trump's Baltimore attacks Marijuana industry donations to lawmakers surge in 2019: analysis MORE (R-Calif.), who declined to say if King should resign.

"I think that's up to Steve King. The voters have elected him. The House Republicans denounce his language," McCarthy said.

McCarthy further declined to say if the National Republican Congressional Committee (NRCC) would support a primary challenge against King. The NRCC historically does not get involved in GOP primaries.

"This is still early about whether Steve King is even running for reelection again," McCarthy said. "Steve King can make that decision, but that decision will come down to his own voters."

Iowa state Sen. Randy Feenstra (R) announced a primary challenge against King last week. Another Republican, Bret Richards, told the Des Moines Register last week that he also plans to run against King.

-Updated 11:12 a.m.