Latest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House

House Democrats on Tuesday failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to provide funding to reopen the government through Feb. 1. 

The bill, which went down 237-187, was brought to the floor in an effort to pressure GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald TrumpPredictions of disaster for Democrats aren't guarantees of midterm failure A review of President Biden's first year on border policy  Hannity after Jan. 6 texted McEnany 'no more stolen election talk' in five-point plan for Trump MORE in his demand for border wall funding amid the partial government shutdown. 

Six Republicans — Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikHouse GOP leaders vow to end proxy voting despite widespread use among Republicans House GOP campaign arm rakes in 0M in 2021 JD Vance raises more than million in second fundraising quarter for Ohio Senate bid MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHillicon Valley — YouTube takes some heat Former GOP rep: Social media companies should be able to suspend Trump, others for 'boldfaced lies' Hillicon Valley — Presented by Ericsson — Tackling the misinformation 'crisis' MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Schumer tees up doomed election reform vote Democrats eye prime pickup chance in Katko retirement Clyburn says he's worried about losing House, 'losing this democracy' MORE (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithLawmakers seek 'assurances' Olympic uniforms not linked to forced labor Biden signs bill punishing China for Uyghur abuses Last living Nuremberg Trials prosecutor deserves Congressional Gold Medal MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerThe fates of the 10 House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump Pelosi: McCarthy has 'obligation' to help Jan. 6 investigation West Virginia lawmaker slams GOP colleague over support for infrastructure law MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickRedistricting reform key to achieving the bipartisanship Americans claim to want House GOP members introduce legislation targeting Russia over Ukraine Ukraine president, US lawmakers huddle amid tensions with Russia MORE (Pa.) — joined Democrats in voting for the measure, fewer than backed similar legislation last week.

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House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTwo women could lead a powerful Senate spending panel for first time in history Lobbying world Progressives fight for leverage amid ever-slimming majority MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced the measure on Monday along with a separate stopgap that would provide funding through Feb. 28, which is expected to come to the floor on Thursday.

The first CR's failure comes on the 25th day of the shutdown as Democratic leaders remain at odds with Republicans over Trump’s border wall. The president has vowed not to sign any spending legislation that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border — one of the top promises he made on the campaign trail. Democrats say they won’t support legislation that provides anything close to the administration's request of $5.7 billion.

The House bills stand no chance in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellBiden stiff arms progressives on the Postal Service Biden clarifies any Russian movement into Ukraine 'is an invasion' The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden talks, Senate balks MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly said he will not take up any legislation the president won’t support.

The lower chamber passed four clean individual spending bills last week, a legislative package aimed at providing funding for the majority of agencies through the end of the fiscal year and a CR to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8.

Meetings between congressional leaders and the president have largely been contentious and unfruitful, with each side digging in.

Both parties are attempting to sway members across the aisle to buck party lines.

A group of moderate Democrats rebuffed an invitation from the president to come to the White House to discuss border security Tuesday.

Republicans are accusing Democrats of failing to negotiate in good faith, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyHouse GOP leaders vow to end proxy voting despite widespread use among Republicans Jan. 6 committee asks Ivanka Trump to sit for interview How Kevin McCarthy sold his soul to Donald Trump MORE (R-Calif.) arguing Democratic negotiators need to put forward a reasonable compromise to end the shutdown.

Democrats allege Republicans are holding the government hostage over a partisan priority.