Latest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House

House Democrats on Tuesday failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to provide funding to reopen the government through Feb. 1. 

The bill, which went down 237-187, was brought to the floor in an effort to pressure GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpTrump faces high stakes in meeting with Erdoğan amid impeachment drama Democrats worry they don't have right candidate to beat Trump Trump threatening to fire Mulvaney: report MORE in his demand for border wall funding amid the partial government shutdown. 

Six Republicans — Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikKatie Pavlich: Schiff's shifting standards GOP lawmaker: Schiff should be first witness Republicans call to testify in impeachment inquiry Singer Brandi Carlile drops out of Fortune event over Kirstjen Nielsen's appearance MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHere are the key players to watch at impeachment hearing Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches Retirements pose threat to cybersecurity expertise in Congress MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoProgressive group unveils first slate of 2020 congressional endorsements Democratic lawmakers call on Judiciary Committee to advance 'revenge porn' law Katie Hill resignation reignites push for federal 'revenge porn' law MORE (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithChina threatens 'strong countermeasures' if Congress passes Hong Kong legislation This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington Nancy Pelosi is ready for this fight MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerGOP lawmakers offer new election security measure GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine Dems push to revive Congress' tech office MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHillicon Valley: Critics press feds to block Google, Fitbit deal | Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-linked accounts | TikTok looks to join online anti-terrorism effort | Apple pledges .5B to affordable housing Twitter takes down Hamas, Hezbollah-affiliated accounts after lawmaker pressure GOP lawmakers express concerns about Giuliani's work in Ukraine MORE (Pa.) — joined Democrats in voting for the measure, fewer than backed similar legislation last week.

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House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyOn The Money: Trump seeks to shift spotlight from impeachment to economy | Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline | New study says tariffs threaten 1.5M jobs Appropriators agree to Dec. 20 funding deadline Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced the measure on Monday along with a separate stopgap that would provide funding through Feb. 28, which is expected to come to the floor on Thursday.

The first CR's failure comes on the 25th day of the shutdown as Democratic leaders remain at odds with Republicans over Trump’s border wall. The president has vowed not to sign any spending legislation that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border — one of the top promises he made on the campaign trail. Democrats say they won’t support legislation that provides anything close to the administration's request of $5.7 billion.

The House bills stand no chance in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell protege emerges as Kentucky's next rising star Hillicon Valley: Schumer questions Army over use of TikTok | Federal court rules against random searches of travelers' phones | Groups push for election security funds in stopgap bill | Facebook's new payment feature | Disney+ launch hit by glitches McConnell, GOP leaders say they won't be watching House impeachment hearing MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly said he will not take up any legislation the president won’t support.

The lower chamber passed four clean individual spending bills last week, a legislative package aimed at providing funding for the majority of agencies through the end of the fiscal year and a CR to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8.

Meetings between congressional leaders and the president have largely been contentious and unfruitful, with each side digging in.

Both parties are attempting to sway members across the aisle to buck party lines.

A group of moderate Democrats rebuffed an invitation from the president to come to the White House to discuss border security Tuesday.

Republicans are accusing Democrats of failing to negotiate in good faith, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyHouse Republicans prepare for public impeachment proceedings with mock hearing Live updates on impeachment: Schiff fires warning at GOP over whistleblower Congress hunts for path out of spending stalemate MORE (R-Calif.) arguing Democratic negotiators need to put forward a reasonable compromise to end the shutdown.

Democrats allege Republicans are holding the government hostage over a partisan priority.