Latest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House

House Democrats on Tuesday failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to provide funding to reopen the government through Feb. 1. 

The bill, which went down 237-187, was brought to the floor in an effort to pressure GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpLiz Cheney: 'Send her back' chant 'inappropriate' but not about race, gender Booker: Trump is 'worse than a racist' Top Democrat insists country hasn't moved on from Mueller MORE in his demand for border wall funding amid the partial government shutdown. 

Six Republicans — Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikRepublican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Rising number of GOP lawmakers criticize Trump remarks about minority Dems Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdAl Green says impeachment is 'only solution' to Trump's rhetoric Trump primary challenger Bill Weld responds to rally chants: 'We are in a fight for the soul of the GOP' Democratic strategist on Trump tweets: 'He's feeding this fear and hate' MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoStudent loan borrowers are defaulting yearly — how can we fix it? Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker House approves amendment to reverse transgender military ban MORE (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants House approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour House calls for investigation into whether Pentagon tried to weaponize ticks MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances House fails to override Trump veto on border wall MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants Al Green says impeachment is 'only solution' to Trump's rhetoric House approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour MORE (Pa.) — joined Democrats in voting for the measure, fewer than backed similar legislation last week.

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House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyHere are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment House votes to kill impeachment effort against Trump Hillicon Valley: Trump officials to investigate French tax on tech giants | Fed chair raises concerns about Facebook's crypto project | FCC blocks part of San Francisco law on broadband competition | House members warn of disinformation 'battle' MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced the measure on Monday along with a separate stopgap that would provide funding through Feb. 28, which is expected to come to the floor on Thursday.

The first CR's failure comes on the 25th day of the shutdown as Democratic leaders remain at odds with Republicans over Trump’s border wall. The president has vowed not to sign any spending legislation that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border — one of the top promises he made on the campaign trail. Democrats say they won’t support legislation that provides anything close to the administration's request of $5.7 billion.

The House bills stand no chance in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell challenger faces tougher path after rocky launch Funding a strong defense of our nation's democratic process can't wait The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly said he will not take up any legislation the president won’t support.

The lower chamber passed four clean individual spending bills last week, a legislative package aimed at providing funding for the majority of agencies through the end of the fiscal year and a CR to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8.

Meetings between congressional leaders and the president have largely been contentious and unfruitful, with each side digging in.

Both parties are attempting to sway members across the aisle to buck party lines.

A group of moderate Democrats rebuffed an invitation from the president to come to the White House to discuss border security Tuesday.

Republicans are accusing Democrats of failing to negotiate in good faith, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants History in the House: Congress weathers unprecedented week EU official in Canada says he feels 'at home' there because no one was shouting 'send him back' MORE (R-Calif.) arguing Democratic negotiators need to put forward a reasonable compromise to end the shutdown.

Democrats allege Republicans are holding the government hostage over a partisan priority.