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Latest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House

House Democrats on Tuesday failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to provide funding to reopen the government through Feb. 1. 

The bill, which went down 237-187, was brought to the floor in an effort to pressure GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald TrumpIran's leader vows 'revenge,' posting an image resembling Trump Former Sanders spokesperson: Biden 'backing away' from 'populist offerings' Justice Dept. to probe sudden departure of US attorney in Atlanta after Trump criticism MORE in his demand for border wall funding amid the partial government shutdown. 

Six Republicans — Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikWyoming county votes to censure Liz Cheney for Trump impeachment vote Stefanik knocks Albany newspaper over 'childless' characterization GOP divided over Liz Cheney's future MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse poised to override Trump veto for first time Lawmakers call for including creation of Latino, women's history museums in year-end spending deal House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoRep. John Katko: Why I became the first Republican lawmaker to support impeachment NY Republican says cybersecurity will be a high priority for Homeland Security panel Upton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents MORE (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithDemocrats were united on top issues this Congress — but will it hold? Woman tased, arrested for trespassing for not wearing mask at Ohio football game China sanctioning Rubio, Cruz in retaliatory move over Hong Kong MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickTrump's assault on the federal government isn't over Growing number of GOP lawmakers say they support impeachment GOP lawmakers introduce resolution to censure Trump over Capitol riot MORE (Pa.) — joined Democrats in voting for the measure, fewer than backed similar legislation last week.

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House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTrump seeks to freeze .4 billion of programs in final week of presidency This week: Trump's grip on Hill allies faces test Trump signs .3T relief, spending package MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced the measure on Monday along with a separate stopgap that would provide funding through Feb. 28, which is expected to come to the floor on Thursday.

The first CR's failure comes on the 25th day of the shutdown as Democratic leaders remain at odds with Republicans over Trump’s border wall. The president has vowed not to sign any spending legislation that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border — one of the top promises he made on the campaign trail. Democrats say they won’t support legislation that provides anything close to the administration's request of $5.7 billion.

The House bills stand no chance in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellTrump selects South Carolina lawyer for impeachment trial McConnell proposes postponing impeachment trial until February For Biden, a Senate trial could aid bipartisanship around COVID relief MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly said he will not take up any legislation the president won’t support.

The lower chamber passed four clean individual spending bills last week, a legislative package aimed at providing funding for the majority of agencies through the end of the fiscal year and a CR to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8.

Meetings between congressional leaders and the president have largely been contentious and unfruitful, with each side digging in.

Both parties are attempting to sway members across the aisle to buck party lines.

A group of moderate Democrats rebuffed an invitation from the president to come to the White House to discuss border security Tuesday.

Republicans are accusing Democrats of failing to negotiate in good faith, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin McCarthyMcCarthy supports Cheney remaining in leadership amid calls for her to step down The Hill's 12:30 Report: Biden hits the ground running on COVID Biden's inauguration marked by conflict of hope and fear MORE (R-Calif.) arguing Democratic negotiators need to put forward a reasonable compromise to end the shutdown.

Democrats allege Republicans are holding the government hostage over a partisan priority.