Latest funding bill to reopen the government fails in House

House Democrats on Tuesday failed to garner the two-thirds majority needed to pass a continuing resolution (CR) to provide funding to reopen the government through Feb. 1. 

The bill, which went down 237-187, was brought to the floor in an effort to pressure GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpAverage tax refunds down double-digits, IRS data shows White House warns Maduro as Venezuela orders partial closure of border with Colombia Trump administration directs 1,000 more troops to Mexican border MORE in his demand for border wall funding amid the partial government shutdown. 

Six Republicans — Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP announces members who will serve on House intel panel Bipartisan House group introduces bills to stall Syria, South Korea troop withdrawals House votes on 10th bill to reopen government MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdDon’t look for House GOP to defy Trump on border wall White House, GOP defend Trump emergency declaration GOP rep: Trump emergency declaration puts US in 'uncharted territory' MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for Overnight Defense: Gillibrand offers bill to let transgender troops serve | Pentagon ready to protect US personnel in Venezuela | Dems revive fight with Trump over Saudis MORE (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithHouse to vote on background check bills next week House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for Dems escalate gun fight a year after Parkland MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerThe Hill's 12:30 Report: Sanders set to shake up 2020 race House Dems release 2020 GOP 'retirements to watch' for House Dems unveil initial GOP targets in 2020 MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHouse to vote on background check bills next week Dems escalate gun fight a year after Parkland House panel advances bill to expand background checks for gun sales MORE (Pa.) — joined Democrats in voting for the measure, fewer than backed similar legislation last week.

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House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweySenate plots to avoid fall shutdown brawl On The Money: Trump declares emergency at border | Braces for legal fight | Move divides GOP | Trump signs border deal to avoid shutdown | Winners, losers from spending fight | US, China trade talks to resume next week How the border deal came together MORE (D-N.Y.) introduced the measure on Monday along with a separate stopgap that would provide funding through Feb. 28, which is expected to come to the floor on Thursday.

The first CR's failure comes on the 25th day of the shutdown as Democratic leaders remain at odds with Republicans over Trump’s border wall. The president has vowed not to sign any spending legislation that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border — one of the top promises he made on the campaign trail. Democrats say they won’t support legislation that provides anything close to the administration's request of $5.7 billion.

The House bills stand no chance in the Senate, where Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKids confront Feinstein over Green New Deal Trump selects Kelly Craft for United Nations ambassador Union leader says Green New Deal would make infrastructure bill ‘absolutely impossible’ MORE (R-Ky.) has repeatedly said he will not take up any legislation the president won’t support.

The lower chamber passed four clean individual spending bills last week, a legislative package aimed at providing funding for the majority of agencies through the end of the fiscal year and a CR to fund the Department of Homeland Security through Feb. 8.

Meetings between congressional leaders and the president have largely been contentious and unfruitful, with each side digging in.

Both parties are attempting to sway members across the aisle to buck party lines.

A group of moderate Democrats rebuffed an invitation from the president to come to the White House to discuss border security Tuesday.

Republicans are accusing Democrats of failing to negotiate in good faith, with House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthySteve King says he will run again in 2020: 'I have nothing to apologize for' Steve King spins GOP punishment into political weapon Steve King asks for Congressional Record correction over white supremacist quote MORE (R-Calif.) arguing Democratic negotiators need to put forward a reasonable compromise to end the shutdown.

Democrats allege Republicans are holding the government hostage over a partisan priority.