House passes resolution condemning white nationalism

The House overwhelmingly passed a resolution on Tuesday condemning white nationalism and white supremacy in the wake of public remarks by Rep. Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingThe Hill's Morning Report — Combative Trump aims at Pelosi before Russia report Steve King's campaign spent more than it raised last quarter It's time for a 'Congressional Jewish Caucus' MORE (R-Iowa) questioning why the terms are considered offensive.

The resolution, approved in a 424-1 vote, doesn’t directly rebuke King.

Instead, the text states that the House “once again rejects White nationalism and White supremacy as hateful expressions of intolerance that are contradictory to the values that define the people of the United States.”

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Some Democrats want to go much further and argued the measure offered by House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.), a senior member of the Congressional Black Caucus, was too soft. Reps. Tim RyanTimothy (Tim) John RyanTim Ryan doesn't back impeachment proceedings against Trump Cory Booker has a problem in 2020: Kamala Harris 2020 Dems ratchet up anti-corporate talk in bid to woo unions MORE (D-Ohio) and Bobby RushBobby Lee RushCongress should look into its own taxes and travel, not just Trump's The Congressional Black Caucus: America stands to lose a lot under TrumpCare House Dem renews call for censuring Steve King MORE (D-Ill.) have both introduced resolutions to censure King for his remarks.

Rush voted against Clyburn’s resolution, which was tailored to draw bipartisan support. In a statement, Rush said that “while I strongly condemn white supremacy and white nationalism, my position remains unchanged. Anything short of censure is shallow.”

Clyburn told reporters after the vote that he opted for a resolution that didn't go as far to accommodate some lawmakers who weren't comfortable with censuring King.

"It doesn't go far enough for me," Clyburn acknowledged, adding that he would support censuring King.
 
"I try when I can not to make people uncomfortable. When I can, I try to accommodate people's feelings and positions. And we have a few people who are uncomfortable with censure, but very comfortable with disapproval," Clyburn said.

King voted in favor of the resolution, saying, "I agree with the language in it."

A growing number of Republicans are calling for King to resign, including Sen. Mitt RomneyWillard (Mitt) Mitt RomneyGiuliani: 'Nothing wrong' with campaign taking information from Russians Earth Day founder's daughter: Most Republican leaders believe in climate change in private Senate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller MORE (Utah), Rep. Chris StewartChristopher (Chris) Douglas StewartBarr testimony opens new partisan fight over FBI spying on Trump Hill-HarrisX poll: 76 percent oppose Trump pardoning former campaign aides Dems fear Trump is looking at presidential pardons MORE (Utah) and House GOP Conference Chairwoman Liz CheneyElizabeth (Liz) Lynn CheneyRep. Cheney: Socialism 'driving the agenda of the Democratic Party' Dem lawmaker offers tool for 'filling in the blanks' of Green New Deal Judd Gregg: In praise of Mike Enzi MORE (Wyo.).

Cheney said at a press conference earlier Tuesday that “I think he should find another line of work,” echoing a statement from Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellSenate Republicans tested on Trump support after Mueller Anti-smoking advocates question industry motives for backing higher purchasing age Former Bush assistant: Mueller report makes Obama look 'just plain bad' MORE (R-Ky.) a day earlier.

The third-ranking House Republican went further than House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyWatchdog: Custodial staff alleged sexual harassment in lawmakers' offices John Legend, Chrissy Teigen lash out at Trump at Dem retreat Republicans call for ex-Trump lawyer Cohen to be referred to DOJ MORE (R-Calif.), who said it’s up to King’s constituents to keep him in the House.

King, who has a long history of courting controversy on race, has maintained that his comments to The New York Times were taken out of context.

“White nationalist, white supremacist, Western civilization — how did that language become offensive? Why did I sit in classes teaching me about the merits of our history and our civilization?” King said in the interview published last week.

The vote came a day after House GOP leaders announced they would not assign King to any committees for the new Congress. King had served on the Judiciary, Agriculture and Small Business committees. He had even served as a chairman of a Judiciary subcommittee on the Constitution and Civil Justice and could have served as its ranking member under the Democratic majority.

King has denied that he supports white nationalism or supremacy.

“Leader McCarthy’s decision to remove me from committees is a political decision that ignores the truth,” he said in a statement Monday.

GOP leaders previously haven’t punished King for making controversial remarks.

King in 2013 said in an interview with Newsmax that for every undocumented immigrant who becomes a valedictorian, “there's another 100 out there who weigh 130 pounds and they've got calves the size of cantaloupes because they're hauling 75 pounds of marijuana across the desert.” Then-Speaker John BoehnerJohn Andrew Boehner20 years after Columbine, Dems bullish on gun reform Dem says marijuana banking bill will get House vote this spring Trump appears alongside Ocasio-Cortez on Time 100 list MORE (R-Ohio) called King's comments “deeply offensive and wrong.”

In 2017, King created another firestorm when he said that “we can’t rebuild our civilization with somebody else’s babies” while tweeting in support of an anti-Muslim nationalist Dutch politician.

Then-Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers FEC filing: No individuals donated to indicted GOP rep this cycle The Hill's Morning Report - Waiting on Mueller: Answers come on Thursday MORE (R-Wis.) told Fox News at the time that “I disagree with that statement.”

But no action was taken against King, who claimed to The Hill following pushback from a handful of fellow GOP lawmakers that “my colleagues have generally been coming by and patting me on the back.”

King also drew condemnation last year from the then-chairman of the National Republican Congressional Committee, Rep. Steve StiversSteven (Steve) Ernst StiversMarijuana banking bill picks up momentum The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems plot next steps over Mueller report The Hill's 12:30 Report: Dems aim to end anti-Semitism controversy with vote today MORE (R-Ohio), after supporting a white nationalist candidate for Toronto mayor and telling an Austrian publication, “What does this diversity bring that we don’t already have?”

President TrumpDonald John TrumpThorny part of obstruction of justice is proving intent, that's a job for Congress Obama condemns attacks in Sri Lanka as 'an attack on humanity' Schiff rips Conway's 'display of alternative facts' on Russian election interference MORE has not criticized King’s more recent remarks, and told reporters on Monday that he hadn’t been closely following the issue.

-Updated 4:44 p.m.