Democrats will push to retake vote on funding government after chaos on the floor

Democrats will seek a revote on a measure to reopen the government after a Thursday vote devolved into an argument on the House floor.

Chaos broke out after Republicans blasted Democrats for passing a stopgap spending measure to reopen the government through voice vote. The vote will be postponed after Republicans called foul on their request for a roll call vote not being granted.

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The Democratic bill, which would fund the government through Feb. 28, was expected to be approved but will be dead on arrival in the Senate.

Democrats will request to vacate the vote and take it up again next week, according to a Democratic leadership aide.

Democrats have been attempting to pressure GOP lawmakers into breaking with President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats ask if they have reason to worry about UK result Trump scramble to rack up accomplishments gives conservatives heartburn Seven years after Sandy Hook, the politics of guns has changed MORE's request for wall funding in any government spending bill by bringing a series of clean continuing resolutions to the floor.

On Thursday, House Democrats were expected to pass a continuing resolution, but Republicans pushed back on the method of vote.

Republicans argued they had called for a roll call vote on the measure, with Rep. Brett GuthrieSteven (Brett) Brett GuthrieShimkus announces he will stick with plan to retire after reconsidering Hillicon Valley: Tech grapples with California 'gig economy' law | FCC to investigate Sprint over millions in subsidies | House bill aims to protect telecom networks | Google wins EU fight over 'right to be forgotten' | 27 nations sign cyber rules pact House bill aims to secure telecom networks against foreign interference MORE (R-Ky.) having made the request, which was ignored or not heard by Rep. G.K. ButterfieldGeorge (G.K.) Kenneth ButterfieldDemocrats likely to gain seats under new North Carolina maps North Carolina poised to pass new congressional maps Black leaders say African American support in presidential primary is fluid MORE (D-N.C.), who was presiding over the floor during the vote. Sources on the floor said the request was made too late.

House Minority Whip Steve ScaliseStephen (Steve) Joseph ScaliseFox's Chris Wallace calls out Trump for the 'most sustained assault on freedom of the press' in US history McCarthy: I don't think there's a need to whip the impeachment vote GOP calls for minority hearing on impeachment, threatens procedural measures MORE (R-La.) then called for a motion to vacate the vote and call members back to vote again on the measure.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerMedia organization fights Trump administration over Ukraine documents FOIA On The Money: Trump, China announce 'Phase One' trade deal | Supreme Court takes up fight over Trump financial records | House panel schedules hearing, vote on new NAFTA deal House panel to hold hearing, vote on Trump's new NAFTA proposal MORE (D-Md.) said while he “feels badly” about the request not being heard — telling Scalise he will listen to the tape — members had already left to return to their districts and he “can’t subject his members to missing that vote.”

“We’ll come back into session today and Hoyer will ask for [unanimous consent] to vacate the vote. A quorum isn’t present, so it’ll be postponed and we’ll ask UC to postpone it to Wednesday,” a Democratic leadership aide told The Hill.

“This is their mistake and they need to own it. Rep. Butterfield waited for nearly 30 seconds — plenty of time for them to call for a vote. This is on them.”

Tensions between the two sides intensified with members yelling across the chamber, casting blame for the government shutdown.

“Go back to Puerto Rico,” one GOP member yelled at Rep. Tony CardenasAntonio (Tony) CardenasMORE (D-Calif.), apparently in reference to a Democrat's recent retreat on the island. Trump has also criticized Democrats for leaving Washington, D.C., while the government isn't funded. 

Rep. Jason SmithJason Thomas SmithPresidential candidates serving in the Senate must recuse themselves from impeachment proceedings Pressure rises on Cheney to make decision Seniors deserve access to Health Savings Accounts MORE (R-Mo.), a member of GOP leadership, who was the one chastening Democrats for their trip to Puerto Rico, said he was not targeting a specific individual with his heated remark on the floor.

"Simply not true," Smith told The Hill. "Was speaking to all the Democrats who were down vacationing in Puerto Rico last weekend during the shutdown, not any individual member."

Trump’s call for $5.7 billion for border security, including a physical barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border, triggered the ongoing partial government shutdown that is nearing a month long. GOP leadership remains confident the party will remain unified in supporting the administration. 

The vote on the continuing resolution followed a separate vote on a GOP measure offered as an alternative. The House rejected in a 222-195 vote that measure, which would pay furloughed workers but keep the government closed.

Scott Wong contributed to this post which was updated at 3:35 p.m.