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House passes bill expressing support for NATO

House passes bill expressing support for NATO
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The House passed bipartisan legislation on Tuesday expressing congressional support for the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO).

The bill, which passed in a 357-22 vote, includes a provision rejecting any efforts made by President TrumpDonald TrumpGiuliani used provisional ballot to vote in 2020 election, same method he disparaged in fighting to overturn results Trump gets lowest job approval rating in final days as president Fox News' DC managing editor Bill Sammon to retire MORE to potentially withdraw from the treaty. All the "no" votes were from conservative Republicans.

Its passage comes days after administration aides told The New York Times that Trump has repeatedly floated pulling out of NATO over the course of the past year — a move critics fear would embolden Russia and threaten strategic international military alliances.

The House-passed measure, spearheaded by Rep. Jimmy PanettaJames Varni PanettaLawmakers want Pentagon, DOJ to punish current, former military members who participated in riot Capitol riots spark fear of Trump's military powers in final days Americans want to serve — it's up to us to give them the chance MORE (D-Calif.), would bar any funds from being used to withdraw from the alliance.

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“This bill makes it clear the United States Congress still believes in the NATO mission and will prevent any short-sighted efforts to undermine the NATO or unilaterally withdrawal our country,” House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerBoebert communications director resigns amid Capitol riot: report GOP divided over Liz Cheney's future Pelosi mum on when House will send impeachment article to Senate MORE (D-Md.) told reporters Tuesday, highlighting the alliance's role in the peaceful end to the Cold War.

The legislation also includes language calling on NATO members to meet their commitment of providing at least 2 percent of their GDP for defense spending, which was agreed upon in the 2014 Wales Defense Investment Pledge. It also promotes “robust funding for the European Deterrence Initiative to counter Russian aggression.”

"You know, all of us up here agree that we can continue to pressure our NATO allies to pay their self-stated goal of 2 percent of their GDP to the alliance. But that doesn't mean that we want to get out of here,” Panetta told reporters head of the vote.

“In fact, that would be a historic mistake. Because what we have to realize is that NATO is not just a transactional relationship," he said, adding that the focus "can't just be on who pays what and who gets what. Being a member of NATO is not like being a member of a country club.”

Panetta stressed that it is critical for the U.S. to remain in the alliance to help deter Russian aggression. He said other countries can work with the U.S. to prepare not only for the possibility of conventional war, but to “also push back against Russia's constant use of hybrid warfare.”

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelState Department sets up new bureau for cybersecurity and emerging technologies How Congress dismissed women's empowerment 2020: A year in photos MORE (D-N.Y.) cosponsored the legislation along with Reps. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) Malinowski'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack Mo Brooks defends comments at pro-Trump rally after 'vicious and scurrilous' attacks House Democrats unveil resolution to censure Rep. Mo Brooks over Capitol riots MORE (D-N.J.), Don Bacon (R-Neb.), Seth MoultonSeth MoultonLawmakers want Pentagon, DOJ to punish current, former military members who participated in riot House chairman endorses Michele Flournoy for Biden's Pentagon chief Trump critic: I am not afraid of Trump MORE (D-Mass.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse poised to override Trump veto for first time Lawmakers call for including creation of Latino, women's history museums in year-end spending deal House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit MORE (R-Texas), Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis Spanberger'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack Chamber of Commerce slams GOP effort to challenge Biden's win Five centrist Democrats oppose Pelosi for Speaker in tight vote MORE (D-Va.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Mich.), Chrissy Houlahan (D-Pa.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerUpton becomes first member of Congress to vote to impeach two presidents The Hill's Morning Report - Trump impeached again; now what? Kinzinger says he is 'in total peace' after impeachment vote MORE (R-Ill.) and Mike GallagherMichael (Mike) John Gallagher'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack GOP lawmaker on protesters storming Capitol: 'I have not seen anything like this since I deployed to Iraq' GOP lawmakers plead for calm, urge Trump to help restore order amid Capitol violence MORE (R-Wis.).

Lawmakers who voted against the measure Tuesday included GOP Reps. Rick AllenRichard (Rick) Wayne AllenGeorgia elections chief refutes election claims in letter to Congress READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results South Carolina Republican tests positive for coronavirus hours after speaking on House floor MORE (Ga.), Justin AmashJustin AmashRepublicans eye primaries in impeachment vote Michigan GOP lawmaker says he's 'strongly considering' impeachment Newly sworn in Republican House member after Capitol riot: 'I regret not bringing my gun to D.C.' MORE (Mich.), Andy Biggs (Ariz.), Tim BurchettTimothy (Tim) Floyd BurchettREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results GOP lawmaker: 'Pretty cool' Harris has a shot at being the 'most powerful person in the world' Congress should encourage businesses, schools to reopen safely with liability protections MORE (Tenn.), Ben ClineBenjamin (Ben) Lee ClineREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Parties collide over police reform House GOP urge Trump against supporting additional funding for state and local governments MORE (Va.), Scott DesJarlais (Tenn.), Russ Fulcher (Ind.), Matt GaetzMatthew (Matt) GaetzFlorida Republicans close ranks with Trump after Capitol siege The Memo: Historic vote leaves Trump more isolated than ever Top Republican congressional aide resigns, rips GOP lawmakers who objected to Biden win MORE (Fla.), Louie GohmertLouis (Louie) Buller GohmertTrust between lawmakers reaches all-time low after Capitol riots Why Trump could face criminal charges for inciting violence and insurrection Democrats to levy fines on maskless lawmakers on House floor MORE (Texas), Paul GosarPaul Anthony GosarCruz, Cornyn to attend Biden inauguration Trust between lawmakers reaches all-time low after Capitol riots House conservatives plot to oust Liz Cheney MORE (Ariz.), Morgan GriffithHoward (Morgan) Morgan GriffithDemocrats to levy fines on maskless lawmakers on House floor READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Chip Roy challenges seating of House members from six presidential battleground states MORE (Va.), Andy HarrisAndrew (Andy) Peter HarrisAn attack on America that's divided Congress — and a nation Here are the House Republicans who voted to impeach Trump 'I saw my life flash before my eyes': An oral history of the Capitol attack MORE (Md.), Jody HiceJody Brownlow HiceGeorgia elections chief refutes election claims in letter to Congress READ: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Pence 'welcomes' efforts of lawmakers to 'raise objections' to Electoral College results MORE (Ga.), Jim JordanJames (Jim) Daniel JordanMcCarthy won't back effort to oust Cheney Wyoming GOP shares 'outcry' it has received about Cheney's impeachment vote The Memo: Historic vote leaves Trump more isolated than ever MORE (Ohio), Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieHouse conservatives plot to oust Liz Cheney GOP lawmaker on Capitol protesters: 'I will not be deterred' by 'mob demand' Questions and answers about the Electoral College challenges MORE (Ky.), Tom McClintockThomas (Tom) Milller McClintockAn attack on America that's divided Congress — and a nation Coalition of 7 conservative House Republicans says they won't challenge election results Five Republicans vote for bill to decriminalize marijuana MORE (Calif.), Mark MeadowsMark MeadowsAuthor: Meadows is history's worst White House chief of staff Agency official says Capitol riot hit close to home for former Transportation secretary Chao Republicans wrestle over removing Trump MORE (N.C.), Scott PerryScott Gordon PerryDemocrats to levy fines on maskless lawmakers on House floor Growing number of lawmakers test positive for COVID-19 after Capitol siege New Jersey Democrat thinks she contracted coronavirus during Capitol siege MORE (Pa.), John RoseJohn Williams RoseREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Why your neighborhood community pharmacy may close From state agriculture departments to Congress: Our farmers need the USMCA MORE (Tenn.), Chip RoyCharles (Chip) Eugene RoyGOP divided over Liz Cheney's future Trust between lawmakers reaches all-time low after Capitol riots GOP senators blame Trump after mob overruns Capitol MORE (Texas), Greg SteubeWilliam (Greg) Gregory SteubeREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results Lost cures and innovation, too high a price for Democrats' drug pricing proposals Gaetz set to endorse primary opponent of fellow Florida GOP lawmaker MORE (Fla.) and Randy WeberRandall (Randy) Keith WeberREAD: The Republicans who voted to challenge election results House rebuffs GOP lawmaker's effort to remove references to Democrats in Capitol Hillicon Valley: Judge's ruling creates fresh hurdle for TikTok | House passes bills to secure energy sector against cyberattacks | Biden campaign urges Facebook to remove Trump posts spreading 'falsehoods' MORE (Texas).

The House isn’t the only chamber taking action to deter the administration from pulling out of NATO. A bipartisan group of lawmakers in the Senate recently reintroduced legislation aimed at preventing the commander-in-chief from withdrawing from the alliance without the approval of the upper chamber.