Haaland displays trans flag outside office after Supreme Court decision on transgender military ban

Haaland displays trans flag outside office after Supreme Court decision on transgender military ban
© Stefani Reynolds

Rep. Deb HaalandDebra HaalandOvernight Energy: Dems press Interior chief to embrace climate action | Lawmakers at odds on how to regulate chemicals in water | Warren releases climate plan for military Warren releases plan to tackle climate change threats to military House Dem's bill would require ride-hailing companies to cover drivers' Social Security costs MORE (D-N.M.) said a transgender flag is “proudly” on display outside of her office this week after the Supreme Court allowed the Trump administration to temporarily enforce restrictions on transgender people who serve in the military.

“The trans flag is displayed proudly outside my office door today,” the freshman lawmaker said in a tweet on Tuesday night.

“#ProtectTransTroops,” she added.

Hours before Haaland’s tweet, the high court ruled in a 5 to 4 vote to lift two injunctions blocking a Trump administration policy that prevents most transgender troops from serving. 

Transgender people have only been openly serving in the military since the Obama administration lifted the previous ban on their service in 2016.

ADVERTISEMENT

Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Elizabeth GillibrandGOP faces new challenge in 2020 abortion fight 2020 Dems break political taboos by endorsing litmus tests Biden says Congress must move to protect abortion rights MORE (D-N.Y.) said she plans to reintroduce legislation to ensure transgender people can enlist in the military.

In a statement on Tuesday, Gillibrand said that transgender troops “are willing to die for this country, they make extraordinary sacrifices for our freedom, and they are unafraid to fight for our most sacred values as Americans.”

Sen. Tammy DuckworthLadda (Tammy) Tammy Duckworth25 new sexual harassment claims filed against McDonald's Duckworth tweets photo of female senators showing up first for committee quorum: 'Women getting it done!' Overnight Energy: States fight Trump rollback of Obama lightbulb rules | Greens seek hearing over proposed rule on energy efficiency tests | Top Dem asks GAO to investigate climate threat MORE (D-Ill.), an Iraq War veteran, also criticized the Supreme Court's decision on Tuesday.

She blasted the move "disheartening" in a series of tweets and urged the high court to make clear "that this sort of discrimination has no place in our military."