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House does redo vote on bill to reopen government

House does redo vote on bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House revoted Wednesday on a Democratic-backed short-term spending bill to fund the government through Feb. 28, passing the legislation in a 229-184 vote.

Democratic leaders brought the measure back up for a vote following chaos on the House floor last week. The measure initially passed the lower chamber in a voice vote on Thursday, but Republicans called foul when their request for a roll call was not granted.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDemocrats face increasing pressure to back smaller COVID-19 stimulus Hoyer on Trump election challenges: 'I think this borders on treason' Capitol's COVID-19 spike could be bad Thanksgiving preview MORE (D-Md.) later requested to vacate that vote and bring the measure back to the floor after lawmakers returned from their three-day holiday weekend.

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Six Republicans joined Democrats on Wednesday in voting for the funding bill: GOP Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikCuomo reverses on in-person Thanksgiving plans with family Women of both parties must seize the momentum A louder voice for women everywhere MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members Democrats lead in diversity in new Congress despite GOP gains Senate passes bill to secure internet-connected devices against cyber vulnerabilities MORE (Texas), John Katko (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithWoman tased, arrested for trespassing for not wearing mask at Ohio football game China sanctioning Rubio, Cruz in retaliatory move over Hong Kong China sanctions Cruz, Rubio, others over Xinjiang legislation MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerHouse Hispanic Republicans welcome four new members GOP Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler wins reelection Mild weather could boost voter turnout on Election Day MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickDivided citizenry and government — a call to action for common ground OVERNIGHT ENERGY: Down ballot races carry environmental implications | US officially exits Paris climate accord  Fitzpatrick wins reelection in Pennsylvania MORE (Pa.).

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation Biden Cabinet picks largely unify Democrats — so far New Consensus co-founder discusses proposal for Biden to use Fed to sidestep Congress MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

"Most of our votes are pretty straightforward, but today was a tough/nuanced call," she wrote in a story posted to her official Instagram account. "We didn't vote with the party because one of the spending bills included ICE funding and our community felt strongly about not funding that."

Ocasio-Cortez garnered attention earlier this month after she blasted President TrumpDonald John TrumpMinnesota certifies Biden victory Trump tells allies he plans to pardon Michael Flynn: report Republican John James concedes in Michigan Senate race MORE for funding ICE hours after she voted for a bill to reopen the government that include money for the federal agency. 

Democratic leaders brought the latest short-term funding measure to the floor as part of a strategy to try to pressure GOP lawmakers into breaking with President Trump over his demand for billions of dollars to fund a wall along the nation's southern border.

Its passage comes on the 33rd day of the partial government shutdown as negotiators continue to struggle to find a path forward to reopen the government.

Trump has vowed he will not sign a spending bill that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border, while Democratic negotiators have asserted they are not open to supporting the $5.7 billion in border security funding requested by the administration.

The president over the weekend proposed extending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and temporary protected status as part of an immigration deal with Democrats. But Democratic leaders quickly rebuffed the offer, with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSpending deal clears obstacle in shutdown fight Ocasio-Cortez, Cruz trade jabs over COVID-19 relief: People 'going hungry as you tweet from' vacation Rep. Rick Allen tests positive for COVID-19 MORE (D-Calif.) arguing the proposals are “unacceptable and in total, do not represent a good faith effort to restore certainty to people’s lives.”

Both sides have accused the opposing party of holding the government hostage, with Republicans arguing Democrats aren't taking negotiations seriously and need to present a counteroffer. Democrats, meanwhile, have called for the government to reopen before they move forward with talks on how to best secure the border.

The House will take up a separate measure to fund the remaining agencies through the end of the fiscal year later in the day. Neither measure is expected to pass the upper chamber.

Updated: 2:47 p.m.