House does redo vote on bill to reopen government

House does redo vote on bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House revoted Wednesday on a Democratic-backed short-term spending bill to fund the government through Feb. 28, passing the legislation in a 229-184 vote.

Democratic leaders brought the measure back up for a vote following chaos on the House floor last week. The measure initially passed the lower chamber in a voice vote on Thursday, but Republicans called foul when their request for a roll call was not granted.

House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerHouse poised to hand impeachment articles to Senate House to vote on Iran war powers bills sought by progressives Khanna: Timing of Iran bill being weighed against getting bigger majority MORE (D-Md.) later requested to vacate that vote and bring the measure back to the floor after lawmakers returned from their three-day holiday weekend.

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Six Republicans joined Democrats on Wednesday in voting for the funding bill: GOP Reps. Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikOvernight Energy: Republicans eye top spot on Natural Resources panel | GOP lawmakers push back on bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners | Green groups sue Trump over California fracking plans Republicans push back on bipartisan bill to make greener refrigerators, air conditioners Trump: Pelosi doesn't want to hand over 'fraudulently produced' articles of impeachment MORE (N.Y.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdHouse Democrats launch effort to register minority voters in key districts Hurd says Democrats, media are being manipulated by Iran Bottom Line MORE (Texas), John Katko (N.Y.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithHouse votes to temporarily repeal Trump SALT deduction cap GOP lawmaker to offer bill to create universal charitable deduction on 'Giving Tuesday' China threatens 'strong countermeasures' if Congress passes Hong Kong legislation MORE (N.J.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDemocrats launch bilingual ad campaign off drug pricing bill The Hill's Morning Report — Sponsored by AdvaMed — House panel delays impeachment vote until Friday House passes sweeping Pelosi bill to lower drug prices MORE (Wash.) and Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickFormer Pennsylvania Rep. Fitzpatrick dead at 56 Republicans came to the table on climate this year The rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2019 MORE (Pa.).

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia Here are the 10 senators who voted against Trump's North American trade deal Artist paints Michelle Obama, other women as battered in campaign against domestic violence MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

"Most of our votes are pretty straightforward, but today was a tough/nuanced call," she wrote in a story posted to her official Instagram account. "We didn't vote with the party because one of the spending bills included ICE funding and our community felt strongly about not funding that."

Ocasio-Cortez garnered attention earlier this month after she blasted President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE for funding ICE hours after she voted for a bill to reopen the government that include money for the federal agency. 

Democratic leaders brought the latest short-term funding measure to the floor as part of a strategy to try to pressure GOP lawmakers into breaking with President Trump over his demand for billions of dollars to fund a wall along the nation's southern border.

Its passage comes on the 33rd day of the partial government shutdown as negotiators continue to struggle to find a path forward to reopen the government.

Trump has vowed he will not sign a spending bill that doesn’t provide funding for the barrier along the U.S.-Mexico border, while Democratic negotiators have asserted they are not open to supporting the $5.7 billion in border security funding requested by the administration.

The president over the weekend proposed extending the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrivals program and temporary protected status as part of an immigration deal with Democrats. But Democratic leaders quickly rebuffed the offer, with Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Defense: GAO finds administration broke law by withholding Ukraine aid | Senate opens Trump trial | Pentagon to resume training Saudi students soon Hillicon Valley: FBI to now notify state officials of cyber breaches | Pelosi rips 'shameful' Facebook | 5G group beefs up lobby team | Spotify unveils playlists for pets Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti on impeachment: 'CNN can see through this nonsense' MORE (D-Calif.) arguing the proposals are “unacceptable and in total, do not represent a good faith effort to restore certainty to people’s lives.”

Both sides have accused the opposing party of holding the government hostage, with Republicans arguing Democrats aren't taking negotiations seriously and need to present a counteroffer. Democrats, meanwhile, have called for the government to reopen before they move forward with talks on how to best secure the border.

The House will take up a separate measure to fund the remaining agencies through the end of the fiscal year later in the day. Neither measure is expected to pass the upper chamber.

Updated: 2:47 p.m.