House votes on 10th bill to reopen government

House votes on 10th bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House passed a Democratic-backed package of six appropriations bills Wednesday that would fund the government through the end of the fiscal year.

The legislation, which passed in a 234-180 vote and would fund the government through Sept. 30, is the 10th clean-funding measure that Democrats have voted on to end the partial government shutdown, with most of them passing in the chamber.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the latest measure. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezDemocrat backs up Ocasio-Cortez: Migrant shelters 'are like concentration camps' Ocasio-Cortez marks one-year anniversary of her primary win Democratic lawmaker says treatment of migrants at border 'not American' MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

GOP Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe four House Democrats who voted against the border funding bill Overnight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record Addressing climate change is a win for Republicans — why not embrace it? MORE (Pa.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances House fails to override Trump veto on border wall MORE (Wash.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdThe four House Democrats who voted against the border funding bill Overnight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record Senate panel advances bill to protect government devices against cyber threats MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoOvernight Defense: House passes T spending package with defense funds | Senate set to vote on blocking Saudi arms sales | UN nominee defends climate change record Senate panel advances bill to protect government devices against cyber threats House passes amendment to block funding for transgender troops ban MORE (N.Y.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerGOP lawmakers say Trump wrong to criticize Biden in Japan Overnight Defense: Trump officials say efforts to deter Iran are working | Trump taps new Air Force secretary | House panel passes defense bill that limits border wall funds Trump taps new Air Force secretary MORE (Ill.), Mike SimpsonMIchael (Mike) Keith SimpsonHouse passes Paycheck Fairness Act Press: Democrats dare to think big Dem chairwoman seeks watchdog probe of Park Service’s shutdown operations MORE (Idaho), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithLawmakers sound alarm over violence in Sudan The four House Democrats who voted against the border funding bill New Jersey governor signs rideshare safety law in honor of murdered college student MORE (N.J.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikKlobuchar, Warner introduce bill to limit foreign involvement in US political ads Overnight Defense: Pompeo blames Iran for oil tanker attacks | House panel approves 3B defense bill | Trump shares designs for red, white and blue Air Force One House panel approves 3B defense policy bill MORE (N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonHouse passes bill to protect 'Dreamers' Thirty-four GOP members buck Trump on disaster bill Overnight Health Care: Lawmakers get deal to advance long-stalled drug pricing bill | House votes to condemn Trump's anti-ObamaCare push | Eight House Republicans join with Dems | Trump officials approve Medicaid expansion in Maine MORE (Mich.) and Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenHillicon Valley: House lawmakers reach deal on robocall bill | Laid-off journalists launch ads targeting tech giants | Apple seeks tariff exemptions | Facebook's Libra invites scrutiny Bipartisan House lawmakers announce compromise anti-robocall bill Key senators release bipartisan package to lower health care costs MORE (Ore.) voted with Democrats for the measure.

Democrats advanced the latest measure, introduced by House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyHouse approves bill increasing federal worker pay House Democrats unveil changes to border bill to win over progressives Congress unlikely to reach deal on Trump border bill before break MORE (D-N.Y.), in an attempt to place pressure on GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John Trump2020 Democrats spar over socialism ahead of first debate Senate passes .5 billion border bill, setting up fight with House 'Teflon Don' avoids the scorn of the 'family values' GOP — again MORE’s call to provide funding for a wall along the southern border.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellPelosi: Congress will receive election security briefing in July Adam Scott calls on McConnell to take down 'Parks & Rec' gif Trump says he spoke to Pelosi, McConnell on border package MORE (R-Ky.) has refused to bring forward House-passed bills for a vote in the upper chamber unless they are part of a deal between President Trump and congressional Democrats to end the government shutdown.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on two bills Thursday to reopen the government. The first would provide $5.7 billion in funding for Trump's border wall and extend legal protections to some immigrants who came to the country illegally, for three years. If that bill fails, the chamber would then vote on a three-week continuing resolution (CR) to fund the rest of the government through Feb. 8.

The partial government shutdown entered its 33rd day on Wednesday, with tensions between parties at a high after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiSenate passes .5 billion border bill, setting up fight with House Pelosi: Congress will receive election security briefing in July Trump says he spoke to Pelosi, McConnell on border package MORE (D-Calif.) announced she would not move forward with the steps needed for Trump to deliver the State of the Union next week.

The president has asserted he won’t sign legislation that doesn’t provide border wall funding while Democratic leaders have called on Trump to reopen the government before they negotiate on how to address securing the border.

Both parties have pointed the finger at members across the aisle for the ongoing funding lapse. The shutdown began Dec. 22 and is affecting about 800,000 federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay until funding is restored.

Republicans argue that Democrats are not taking negotiations seriously, pointing to Trump’s proposal over the weekend to extend protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program and temporary protected status (TPS) holders.

Trump offered the extended protections in exchange for wall funding, but Democrats quickly rejected the deal, saying the president's latest proposal contains recycled ideas that they have already opposed.