House votes on 10th bill to reopen government

House votes on 10th bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House passed a Democratic-backed package of six appropriations bills Wednesday that would fund the government through the end of the fiscal year.

The legislation, which passed in a 234-180 vote and would fund the government through Sept. 30, is the 10th clean-funding measure that Democrats have voted on to end the partial government shutdown, with most of them passing in the chamber.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the latest measure. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezHillicon Valley: GOP lawmakers offer election security measure | FTC Dem worries government is 'captured' by Big Tech | Lawmakers condemn Apple over Hong Kong censorship Sanders seeks spark from Ocasio-Cortez at Queens rally Biden endorsed by former Connecticut senator, 51 Massachusetts leaders MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

GOP Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickThe Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by USAA — Ex-Ukraine ambassador testifies Trump pushed for her ouster GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine On The Money: Senate confirms Scalia as Labor chief | Bill with B in wall funding advanced over Democrats' objections | Lawyers reach deal to delay enforcement of NY tax return subpoena MORE (Pa.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerGOP lawmakers offer new election security measure GOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine Dems push to revive Congress' tech office MORE (Wash.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdLawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings Democrats claim new momentum from intelligence watchdog testimony Romney: Trump requesting Biden investigation from China, Ukraine 'wrong and appalling' MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHacker conference report details persistent vulnerabilities to US voting systems Hillicon Valley: Senate passes bill to boost cyber help for agencies, businesses | Watchdog warns Energy Department failing to protect grid | FTC sues Match for allegedly conning users Senate approves bill to boost cyber assistance for federal agencies, private sector MORE (N.Y.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerLawmakers from both sides of the aisle mourn Cummings GOP congressman slams Trump over report that US bombed former anti-ISIS coalition headquarters Kinzinger challenges Trump's defense chief on Syria in closed-door meeting MORE (Ill.), Mike SimpsonMIchael (Mike) Keith SimpsonHouse passes Paycheck Fairness Act Press: Democrats dare to think big Dem chairwoman seeks watchdog probe of Park Service’s shutdown operations MORE (Idaho), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithChina threatens 'strong countermeasures' if Congress passes Hong Kong legislation This week: Congress returns to chaotic Washington Nancy Pelosi is ready for this fight MORE (N.J.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikGOP lawmakers offer new election security measure Cheney slated to introduce bill to place sanctions on Turkey Conservative lawmakers demand Schiff's recusal from Trump impeachment inquiry MORE (N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonGOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine House passes bill to revamp medical screenings for migrants at border Energy efficiency cannot be a partisan issue for Washington MORE (Mich.) and Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenTop Republican rejects Democratic chairman's approach to stopping surprise medical bills Lawmakers hit Trump administration for including tech legal shield in trade negotiations CBO: Pelosi bill to lower drug prices saves Medicare 5 billion MORE (Ore.) voted with Democrats for the measure.

Democrats advanced the latest measure, introduced by House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyTrump officials say aid to Puerto Rico was knowingly stalled after Hurricane Maria McConnell tees up government funding votes amid stalemate Dem committee chairs blast Trump G-7 announcement MORE (D-N.Y.), in an attempt to place pressure on GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpFlorida GOP lawmaker says he's 'thinking' about impeachment Democrats introduce 'THUG Act' to block funding for G-7 at Trump resort Kurdish group PKK pens open letter rebuking Trump's comparison to ISIS MORE’s call to provide funding for a wall along the southern border.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellMcConnell: Trump's troop pull back in Syria a 'grave strategic mistake' Overnight Defense — Presented by Boeing — Trump insists Turkey wants cease-fire | Fighting continues in Syrian town | Pentagon chief headed to Mideast | Mattis responds to criticism from Trump TSA head rules himself out for top DHS job   MORE (R-Ky.) has refused to bring forward House-passed bills for a vote in the upper chamber unless they are part of a deal between President Trump and congressional Democrats to end the government shutdown.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on two bills Thursday to reopen the government. The first would provide $5.7 billion in funding for Trump's border wall and extend legal protections to some immigrants who came to the country illegally, for three years. If that bill fails, the chamber would then vote on a three-week continuing resolution (CR) to fund the rest of the government through Feb. 8.

The partial government shutdown entered its 33rd day on Wednesday, with tensions between parties at a high after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiCummings to lie in state at the Capitol House Republicans 'demand the release of the rules' on impeachment Overnight Health Care — Presented by National Taxpayers Union —Dem wants more changes to Pelosi drug pricing bill | Ebola outbreak wanes, but funding lags | Johnson & Johnson recalls batch of baby powder after asbestos traces found MORE (D-Calif.) announced she would not move forward with the steps needed for Trump to deliver the State of the Union next week.

The president has asserted he won’t sign legislation that doesn’t provide border wall funding while Democratic leaders have called on Trump to reopen the government before they negotiate on how to address securing the border.

Both parties have pointed the finger at members across the aisle for the ongoing funding lapse. The shutdown began Dec. 22 and is affecting about 800,000 federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay until funding is restored.

Republicans argue that Democrats are not taking negotiations seriously, pointing to Trump’s proposal over the weekend to extend protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program and temporary protected status (TPS) holders.

Trump offered the extended protections in exchange for wall funding, but Democrats quickly rejected the deal, saying the president's latest proposal contains recycled ideas that they have already opposed.