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House votes on 10th bill to reopen government

House votes on 10th bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House passed a Democratic-backed package of six appropriations bills Wednesday that would fund the government through the end of the fiscal year.

The legislation, which passed in a 234-180 vote and would fund the government through Sept. 30, is the 10th clean-funding measure that Democrats have voted on to end the partial government shutdown, with most of them passing in the chamber.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the latest measure. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezWarren calls for US to support ceasefire between Israel and Hamas The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez Sanders: Netanyahu has cultivated 'racist nationalism' MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

GOP Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickBipartisan Senate bill introduced to give gyms B in relief America's Jewish communities are under attack — Here are 3 things Congress can do Biden visits local Mexican restaurant to highlight relief program MORE (Pa.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerCheney set to be face of anti-Trump GOP Uninvited Trump is specter at GOP retreat McCarthy defends Trump response to deadly Jan. 6 riot MORE (Wash.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdWill the real Lee Hamiltons and Olympia Snowes please stand up? The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden, Congress drawn into pipeline cyberattack, violence in Israel Pence autobiography coming from Simon & Schuster MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoHouse passes bill mandating accommodations for pregnant workers Lawmakers roll out legislation to defend pipelines against cyber threats Lawmakers reach agreement on bipartisan Jan. 6 commission MORE (N.Y.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerIncreasingly active younger voters liberalize US electorate Sunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Kinzinger: GOP downplaying Capitol riot something 'out of North Korea' MORE (Ill.), Mike SimpsonMIchael (Mike) Keith SimpsonOvernight Energy: Biden reportedly will pledge to halve US emissions by 2030 | Ocasio-Cortez, Markey reintroduce Green New Deal resolution House passes bills providing citizenship path for Dreamers, farmworkers Marjorie Taylor Greene's delay tactics frustrate GOP MORE (Idaho), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithThe Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Biden delivers 100 million shots in 58 days, doses to neighbors The eight Republicans who voted to tighten background checks on guns House approves bills tightening background checks on guns MORE (N.J.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans McCarthy dings Biden after meeting: Doesn't have 'energy of Donald Trump' Cheney seen as merely first victim of Trump election attacks MORE (N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Cheney fight stokes cries of GOP double standard for women Overnight Energy: Michigan reps reintroduce measure for national 'forever chemicals' standard |  White House says gas tax won't be part of infrastructure bill MORE (Mich.) and Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenLobbying world Give Republicans the climate credit they deserve Fox hires former GOP lawmaker Greg Walden as political consultant MORE (Ore.) voted with Democrats for the measure.

Democrats advanced the latest measure, introduced by House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyLobbying world Progressives fight for leverage amid ever-slimming majority Biden needs to tear down bureaucratic walls and refocus Middle East programs MORE (D-N.Y.), in an attempt to place pressure on GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald TrumpSunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans Navajo Nation president on Arizona's new voting restrictions: An 'assault' on our rights The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE’s call to provide funding for a wall along the southern border.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellWashington showing signs of normalcy after year of restrictions Former OMB pick Neera Tanden to serve as senior adviser to Biden Lawmakers reach agreement on bipartisan Jan. 6 commission MORE (R-Ky.) has refused to bring forward House-passed bills for a vote in the upper chamber unless they are part of a deal between President Trump and congressional Democrats to end the government shutdown.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on two bills Thursday to reopen the government. The first would provide $5.7 billion in funding for Trump's border wall and extend legal protections to some immigrants who came to the country illegally, for three years. If that bill fails, the chamber would then vote on a three-week continuing resolution (CR) to fund the rest of the government through Feb. 8.

The partial government shutdown entered its 33rd day on Wednesday, with tensions between parties at a high after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiIncreasingly active younger voters liberalize US electorate Sunday shows preview: House GOP removes Cheney from leadership position; CDC issues new guidance for fully vaccinated Americans The Memo: Lawmakers on edge after Greene's spat with Ocasio-Cortez MORE (D-Calif.) announced she would not move forward with the steps needed for Trump to deliver the State of the Union next week.

The president has asserted he won’t sign legislation that doesn’t provide border wall funding while Democratic leaders have called on Trump to reopen the government before they negotiate on how to address securing the border.

Both parties have pointed the finger at members across the aisle for the ongoing funding lapse. The shutdown began Dec. 22 and is affecting about 800,000 federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay until funding is restored.

Republicans argue that Democrats are not taking negotiations seriously, pointing to Trump’s proposal over the weekend to extend protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program and temporary protected status (TPS) holders.

Trump offered the extended protections in exchange for wall funding, but Democrats quickly rejected the deal, saying the president's latest proposal contains recycled ideas that they have already opposed.