House votes on 10th bill to reopen government

House votes on 10th bill to reopen government
© Greg Nash

The House passed a Democratic-backed package of six appropriations bills Wednesday that would fund the government through the end of the fiscal year.

The legislation, which passed in a 234-180 vote and would fund the government through Sept. 30, is the 10th clean-funding measure that Democrats have voted on to end the partial government shutdown, with most of them passing in the chamber.

Ten Republicans joined Democrats in voting for the latest measure. Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezJoseph Kennedy mulling primary challenge to Markey in Massachusetts The latest victims of the far-left's environmental zealotry: Long Islanders Ocasio-Cortez brushes off Trump tweet claiming she is 'fuming' over Tlaib, Omar attention MORE (N.Y.) was the lone Democrat to vote against the bill.

GOP Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickHouse Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Ensuring quality health care for those with intellectual disabilities and autism House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad MORE (Pa.), Jaime Herrera BeutlerJaime Lynn Herrera BeutlerDems push to revive Congress' tech office Bill allowing Congress to hire Dreamers advances House fails to override Trump veto on border wall MORE (Wash.), Will HurdWilliam Ballard HurdRepublicans offer support for Steve King challenger House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad The 9 House Republicans who support background checks MORE (Texas), John KatkoJohn Michael KatkoRepublicans should get behind the 28th Amendment Student loan borrowers are defaulting yearly — how can we fix it? Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (N.Y.), Adam KinzingerAdam Daniel KinzingerHouse Democrats targeting six more Trump districts for 2020 Assault weapons ban picks up steam in Congress House Democrats target 2020 GOP incumbents in new ad MORE (Ill.), Mike SimpsonMIchael (Mike) Keith SimpsonHouse passes Paycheck Fairness Act Press: Democrats dare to think big Dem chairwoman seeks watchdog probe of Park Service’s shutdown operations MORE (Idaho), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithThe 9 House Republicans who support background checks The Hill's Morning Report: Trump walks back from 'send her back' chants House approves bill raising minimum wage to per hour MORE (N.J.), Elise StefanikElise Marie StefanikRepublican lawmakers ask Trump not to delay Pentagon cloud-computing contract Rising number of GOP lawmakers criticize Trump remarks about minority Dems Overnight Defense: Woman accusing general of sexual assault willing to testify | Joint Chiefs pick warns against early Afghan withdrawal | Tensions rise after Iran tries to block British tanker MORE (N.Y.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonThe 9 House Republicans who support background checks Al Green says impeachment is 'only solution' to Trump's rhetoric Trump primary challenger Bill Weld responds to rally chants: 'We are in a fight for the soul of the GOP' MORE (Mich.) and Greg WaldenGregory (Greg) Paul WaldenLawmakers call on Trump to keep tech legal shield out of trade talks House passes anti-robocall bill Lawmakers deride FTC settlement as weak on Facebook MORE (Ore.) voted with Democrats for the measure.

Democrats advanced the latest measure, introduced by House Appropriations Committee Chairwoman Nita LoweyNita Sue LoweyAppropriators warn White House against clawing back foreign aid Pelosi: Israel's Omar-Tlaib decision 'a sign of weakness' Lawmakers blast Trump as Israel bars door to Tlaib and Omar MORE (D-N.Y.), in an attempt to place pressure on GOP lawmakers to break with President TrumpDonald John TrumpO'Rourke: Trump driving global, U.S. economy into recession Manchin: Trump has 'golden opportunity' on gun reforms Objections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated MORE’s call to provide funding for a wall along the southern border.

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Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellAre Democrats turning Trump-like? House Democrat calls for gun control: Cities can ban plastic straws but 'we can't ban assault weapons?' Churches are arming and training congregants in response to mass shootings: report MORE (R-Ky.) has refused to bring forward House-passed bills for a vote in the upper chamber unless they are part of a deal between President Trump and congressional Democrats to end the government shutdown.

The Senate is scheduled to vote on two bills Thursday to reopen the government. The first would provide $5.7 billion in funding for Trump's border wall and extend legal protections to some immigrants who came to the country illegally, for three years. If that bill fails, the chamber would then vote on a three-week continuing resolution (CR) to fund the rest of the government through Feb. 8.

The partial government shutdown entered its 33rd day on Wednesday, with tensions between parties at a high after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiObjections to Trump's new immigration rule wildly exaggerated Latest pro-democracy rally draws tens of thousands in Hong Kong Lewandowski on potential NH Senate run: If I run, 'I'm going to win' MORE (D-Calif.) announced she would not move forward with the steps needed for Trump to deliver the State of the Union next week.

The president has asserted he won’t sign legislation that doesn’t provide border wall funding while Democratic leaders have called on Trump to reopen the government before they negotiate on how to address securing the border.

Both parties have pointed the finger at members across the aisle for the ongoing funding lapse. The shutdown began Dec. 22 and is affecting about 800,000 federal workers who have been furloughed or forced to work without pay until funding is restored.

Republicans argue that Democrats are not taking negotiations seriously, pointing to Trump’s proposal over the weekend to extend protections for recipients of the Deferred Action for Childhood Arrival (DACA) program and temporary protected status (TPS) holders.

Trump offered the extended protections in exchange for wall funding, but Democrats quickly rejected the deal, saying the president's latest proposal contains recycled ideas that they have already opposed.