Pelosi puts tight grip on talk of Trump impeachment

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiTrevor Noah on lack of Pelosi nickname from Trump: 'There is a reverence for her' Trump says he would challenge impeachment in Supreme Court The Hill's Morning Report - Will Joe Biden's unifying strategy work? MORE (D-Calif.) is keeping her troops in line on one of the most divisive issues facing Democrats internally and the country more broadly: the impeachment of President TrumpDonald John TrumpDemocrats' CNN town halls exposed an extreme agenda Buttigieg says he doubts Sanders can win general election Post-Mueller, Trump has a good story to tell for 2020 MORE.

As the minority leader over the past two years, Pelosi faced a small but intensifying push from rank-and-file Democrats to oust the president — a movement that won two floor votes in the last Congress and the support of 66 House Democrats in early 2018.

ADVERTISEMENT

Yet in the weeks since taking the Speaker’s gavel, Pelosi has tamped down the impeachment talk in her ranks, according to multiple lawmakers, arguing it is important to allow special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSasse: US should applaud choice of Mueller to lead Russia probe MORE to wrap up his investigation into whether the Trump campaign colluded with Russia to sway the 2016 election.

The effort is paying dividends, winning over even the most liberal Trump critics in the caucus while dissuading new acolytes to the impeachment effort, which has struggled to find a foothold in the new Congress. 

“I’m in Speaker Pelosi’s camp. I think we have to see the report,” said Rep. Ro KhannaRohit (Ro) KhannaKhanna breaks with Sanders on voting rights for Boston Marathon bomber: 'I wouldn't go that far' Buttigieg responds to criticism after comparing Sanders, Trump supporters Environmentalists see victory with Green New Deal blitz MORE (D-Calif.), a leader of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. 

“Every week Mueller gives us something else to be aware of. And so most people think he’s doing a very good job. And we ought to let him finish.”

Rep. Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenDems seek to rein in calls for impeachment Dems attack Barr's credibility after report of White House briefings on Mueller findings Democrats, GOP poised to pounce on Mueller findings MORE (D-Tenn.), who had championed impeachment articles in the last Congress, has yet to introduce them this year and says there’s little urgency to do so. He noted that no impeachment effort can succeed without public backing, and Democrats will have more luck building that support if they await the results of Mueller’s probe. 

“Those people, including myself, who think he’s committed impeachable offenses and should be impeached understand also the pragmatic politics of waiting for the report as proof to get more of the American public in agreement. Because you’ve got to have the American public on your side,” Cohen said. 

“I think Mueller’s report will be a blockbuster.”

To be sure, the push for removing Trump under the Democratic majority has not gone away. Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanDems seek to rein in calls for impeachment House Dem: Mueller report offers 'ample evidence' for impeachment Dems offer bill directing IRS to create free online tax filing service MORE (D-Calif.) introduced articles of impeachment on the very first day of the new Congress. And Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenDemocrats face Catch-22 with Trump impeachment strategy Dems seek to rein in calls for impeachment Democrats renew attacks on Trump attorney general MORE (D-Texas), a sponsor of a separate impeachment resolution, joined forces Tuesday with Tom Steyer, a billionaire environmentalist and anti-Trump activist, to make the case for ousting Trump immediately. 

“We have a president who is unfit, [and] we have a means by which we can deal with it,” Green said.

Yet Green was the only Democratic lawmaker to appear at Tuesday’s impeachment event just off of Capitol Hill, creating the impression that it was more sideshow than budding campaign. And the Texas Democrat is quick to emphasize that he’s not asking other lawmakers to join him in the effort. 

“I don’t lobby the members,” he said. “I leave it for each person to do this as a question of conscience.”

ADVERTISEMENT

Rep. Matt CartwrightMatthew (Matt) Alton CartwrightOvernight Health Care — Presented by PCMA — McConnell delivers fierce attack on Medicare for all | Barr defends efforts to overturn ObamaCare | Senators push drug industry 'middlemen' over prices Dems demand answers on Trump officials' decision not to defend ObamaCare Barr defends administration's efforts to overturn ObamaCare in court MORE (D-Pa.), a leader of the Democrats’ messaging arm, pointed to efforts by Pelosi to discourage an impeachment campaign — a cautious approach he characterized as “eminently responsible.”

“The Clinton impeachment was totally political and wrong,” said House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDems charge ahead on immigration Julián Castro: Trump should be impeached for trying to obstruct justice 'in very concrete ways' Dems seek to rein in calls for impeachment MORE (D-Md.). “As a result, I think we’re being prudent and careful, and we’ll see what Mueller has to say.”

Boosting that message has been Pelosi’s handling of the recent government shutdown, which has made her more powerful — and more persuasive — within the diverse Democratic caucus. 

The issue is a tricky one for Pelosi and her leadership team. On one hand, they want to be an aggressive counterweight to Trump for the sake of energizing their liberal base. On the other, they don’t want to get ahead of their skis and risk alienating more moderate voters in ways that might help Trump win reelection in 2020. 

A number of Democrats noted another reason the impeachment push hasn’t taken off in the new Congress: The party’s new majority lends them powerful committee gavels to investigate the numerous allegations dogging Trump and his administration.

“It’s not just the Mueller report. It’s all the other hearings that are going to happen,” said Rep. Mark PocanMark William PocanAppeals court rules House chaplain can reject secular prayers Dems counter portrait of discord Divided Dems look to regroup MORE (D-Wis.), a co-chairman of the Congressional Progressive Caucus. 

Rep. Ted LieuTed W. LieuDems push back on White House suggesting they're 'not smart enough' for Trump's tax returns Civil rights attorney confronts Candace Owens on Fox News Lieu fires back at GOP lawmaker who claims he was 'owned' by Candace Owens: 'She said what she said' MORE (D-Calif.), a member of the Judiciary Committee, which has jurisdiction over the impeachment process, agreed, arguing the need for the various panels “to create a record” surrounding the allegations facing Trump.

“After that is done, it will either exonerate the president and his associates, or it will not,” Lieu said. “But at that point then we, with the American people, will make a decision [on impeachment].”

Cohen, who will chair the Judiciary Committee’s subpanel on the Constitution, said he’s eyeing a number of hearings to help make the public case for eventual impeachment, even if it takes some time.

“Right now there’s no chance it’s going to be successful in the Senate,” Cohen said. “So if we wait a little bit and let the teapot steam — nothing wrong with that.”