Schiff: Intel chiefs testimony may ‘undermine’ Trump’s ability to declare emergency for wall

Schiff: Intel chiefs testimony may ‘undermine’ Trump’s ability to declare emergency for wall

House Intelligence Committee Chairman Adam SchiffAdam Bennett SchiffCohen says Trump attorney told him to say Trump Tower talks ended earlier than they did Cohen told lawmakers that Trump lawyer Sekulow instructed him to lie about Moscow tower project: report Supreme Court declines to hear case on businesses' political contributions MORE (D-Calif.) said Wednesday that new testimony from top U.S. intelligence officials could "undermine" President TrumpDonald John TrumpThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget GOP presses Trump to make a deal on spending Democrats wary of handing Trump a win on infrastructure MORE's ability to declare a national emergency for constructing a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

"The fact that none of the intel chiefs brought up a threat at the southern border as being one of the most pressing threats facing the country, that could be Exhibit A in a challenge to any kind of a declaration of a national emergency,” Schiff said on MSNBC, a day after Director of National Intelligence Dan CoatsDaniel (Dan) Ray CoatsHillicon Valley: Facebook co-founder calls for breaking up company | Facebook pushes back | Experts study 2020 candidates to offset 'deepfake' threat | FCC votes to block China Mobile | Groups, lawmakers accuse Amazon of violating children's privacy Experts are studying mannerisms of 2020 candidates to help offset threat of 'deepfake' videos Bolton held unexpected meeting on Iran with top intel, military advisers at CIA: report MORE and CIA Director Gina Haspel testified before the Senate Intelligence Committee about global threats to the U.S.

The two officials discussed issues such as the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, China and Russia, among other things, during Tuesday's hearing.

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Schiff argued that their testimony showed "that none of the intelligence agencies think" there is an "emergency" at the border, adding "both parties don’t think this is an emergency."

"I think, if anything, it is going to undermine that legal case that the president may try to make, that hearing yesterday could be a central exhibit," Schiff said.

Trump has promised since his 2016 campaign to build a border wall. During the recent partial government shutdown, which lasted a record 35 days, the president insisted on funding from Congress to build a wall.

He eventually signed a continuing resolution that temporarily reopened the government, without money for wall construction. 

Trump has floated the idea of declaring a national emergency if Congress can't reach an agreement that provides wall funding. Sen. Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamTensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Press: Justin Amash breaks ranks with party Overnight Defense: Iran tensions swirl as officials prepare to brief Congress | Trump threatens war would be 'end of Iran' | Graham tells Trump to 'stand firm' | Budget talks begin MORE (R-S.C.) on Monday said Trump "must" take that step if lawmakers can't reach a deal with the White House.

Rep. Justin AmashJustin AmashThe Hill's Morning Report - White House, Congress: Urgency of now around budget Buzz grows Rep. Amash will challenge Trump as a Libertarian House Freedom Caucus votes to condemn Amash's impeachment comments MORE (R-Mich.) and Sen. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioTensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Tensions swirl around Iran as administration to brief Congress Ending the Cyprus arms embargo will increase tensions in the Eastern Mediterranean MORE (R-Fla.) have both voiced opposition to using emergency powers as an option, with Rubio calling it a "terrible" idea.