Trump will give State of Union to sea of opponents

When Donald TrumpDonald John TrumpWHCA calls on Trump to denounce video depicting him shooting media outlets Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump hits Fox News's Chris Wallace over Ukraine coverage MORE stands on the elevated dais and looks out onto the House floor Tuesday night, the 45th president will see the faces of a number of Democrats eager to unseat him in 2020.

Sen. Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerRepublicans wrestle with impeachment strategy O'Rourke campaign says path to victory hinges on top 5 finishes in Iowa, Nevada O'Rourke raises .5 million in third quarter MORE (D-N.J.), who just launched his presidential bid, will be there at Trump’s State of the Union address, as will Sen. Kamala HarrisKamala Devi HarrisRepublicans wrestle with impeachment strategy Klobuchar takes shots at health and education plans supported by Sanders and Warren Kamala Harris to Trump Jr.: 'You wouldn't know a joke if one raised you' MORE (D-Calif.). Last year, both aggressively grilled Trump’s Supreme Court nominee, Brett KavanaughBrett Michael KavanaughSupreme Court can prove its independence — or its partisan capture Overnight Health Care — Presented by Coalition Against Surprise Medical Billing — Planned Parenthood plans M campaign for 2020 | Dem candidates embrace aggressive step on drug prices | Officials propose changes to encourage 'value-based' care Bans on public coverage for abortion are unjustified by science and outright harmful MORE, who likely will be sitting in the front row with his fellow justices.

Trump will also see Democratic Sen. Kirsten GillibrandKirsten Gillibrand2020 Presidential Candidates Krystal Ball: Yang campaign a 'triumph of substance over the theatre' Three 2020 candidates have missed about half of Senate votes MORE from his home state of New York, and Sen. Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth Ann WarrenSanders can gain ground by zeroing in on corruption Biden praises Buttigieg for criticizing GOP attacks: 'That's a good man' Warren enters crucial debate with big momentum MORE (D-Mass.), whom Trump frequently mocks as “Pocahontas” for her claims of Native American heritage.

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Reps. Tulsi GabbardTulsi GabbardGabbard slams New York Times profile of her Krystal Ball defends praise of Yang: I am not 'a Russian plant' Gabbard backs Sanders proposal to ban advertisements during primary debates MORE (D-Hawaii)  is running, too, while Rep. Eric SwalwellEric Michael Swalwell2020 Presidential Candidates NBA draws bipartisan backlash over China response Former Ukraine envoy Volker to resign as head of McCain Institute MORE (D-Calif.) and Sens. Bernie SandersBernie SandersSanders wishes Ocasio-Cortez happy birthday Video of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Sanders can gain ground by zeroing in on corruption MORE (I-Vt.), Amy KlobucharAmy Jean KlobucharRepublicans wrestle with impeachment strategy Klobuchar takes shots at health and education plans supported by Sanders and Warren O'Rourke campaign says path to victory hinges on top 5 finishes in Iowa, Nevada MORE (D-Minn.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownBlood cancer patients deserve equal access to the cure Trump admin abruptly delays funding for human trafficking victims: report Overnight Energy: Lawmakers show irritation over withheld Interior documents | Republican offers bipartisan carbon tax bill | Scientists booted from EPA panel form new group MORE (D-Ohio) are all weighing bids.

And during the speech, Trump might think that he’s seeing double: Former Housing and Urban Development Secretary Júlian Castro won’t be on hand, but his twin brother, Rep. Joaquin CastroJoaquin CastroThe Hill's Campaign Report: Impeachment fight to take center stage at Dem debate The Hill's Campaign Report: Warren, Sanders overtake Biden in third-quarter fundraising Joaquin Castro volunteers to play his brother on 'SNL' MORE (D-Texas), probably will.

“It should be great theater as the 2020 hopefuls audition for their base,” freshman Sen. Kevin CramerKevin John CramerWhite House officials stand by Syria withdrawal, sanctions delay amid bipartisan pushback Sunday shows — Officials rush to Trump's defense on Syria, sanctions GOP senator defends Trump's decision on Syria MORE (R-N.D.), a Trump ally and former House member, told The Hill. “It would be fun to have a caption contest as the cameras pan the heckling section.”

Tuesday’s address in the House chamber will be Trump’s second official State of the Union and third major speech to a joint session of Congress. But it will mark his first State of the Union in a new era of divided government, after Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiBiden on impeachment: 'I'm the only reason' it's happening Democrats to offer resolution demanding Trump reverse Syria decision Rand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter MORE (D-Calif.) and the Democrats took back control of the House in a midterms election seen as a referendum on the unpopular and unpredictable president.

A senior administration official nonetheless said Trump is planning to strike a “unifying tone” in his address.

Some issues could get bipartisan applause lines, like lowering prescription drug prices, infrastructure and pressuring China on its trade policies.

“Together we can break decades of political stalemate, we can bridge old divisions, heal old wounds, build new coalitions, forge new solutions and unlock the extraordinary promise of America’s future. The decision is ours to make,” Trump will say, according the official.

If all the 2020 challengers aren’t enough, Pelosi will be sitting just above Trump’s left shoulder, literally breathing down his neck as her committee chairs (sitting in the audience) prepare to launch a slew of investigations into his administration — and several individual Cabinet members who will accompany Trump down the center aisle.

It’ll mark a sea change from Trump’s last two addresses to Congress, where Vice President Pence and then-Speaker Paul RyanPaul Davis RyanAmash: Trump incorrect in claiming Congress didn't subpoena Obama officials Democrats hit Scalia over LGBTQ rights Three-way clash set to dominate Democratic debate MORE (R-Wis.) smiled and applauded behind him throughout.

The two political heavyweights — Trump and Pelosi — have clashed for the past two months over the president’s demand that the Congress approve $5.7 billion for his wall on the southern border. The knock-down, drag-out fight shut down the government for a record 35 days — furloughing 800,000 federal workers, sparking delays at airports and delaying Republicans’ and Democrats’ annual policy retreats.

The State of the Union speech itself became a hostage in the Trump-Pelosi firefight. Pelosi invited and then disinvited Trump to deliver his annual address amid the shutdown. Trump threatened to come to Capitol Hill anyway on Jan. 29, launching an unprecedented standoff between the executive and legislative branches.

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When Trump reopened the government with no new wall funding, caving to Pelosi’s position, the Speaker extended an olive branch, and a second invitation, to Trump for Tuesday.

But the truce seemed to be over as soon as it began, with funding for a handful of federal agencies set to run out again after Feb. 15. Trump has continued to insist Congress deliver him money for his wall; Pelosi has continued to rebuff him.

The real, functional deadline for lawmakers will be on Friday, just three days after Trump appears in the House chamber. Lawmakers on the bipartisan, bicameral conference committee are aiming to complete a deal by the end of this week to give both chambers enough time the following week to send a bill to Trump by the Feb. 15 deadline.

Trump, however, has dismissed the bipartisan committee of negotiators as a “waste of time.”

The president told reporters at the White House on Friday that there is a “good chance” he will declare a national emergency to circumvent Congress and build a wall along the border with Mexico.

“I think there’s a good chance we’ll have to do that,” Trump said.

Trump said people should “listen closely” to his Tuesday address and indicated he'll offer more details about his plan.

Pelosi scoffed at Trump’s dismissal of the conference committee.

“I mean, really, a president who wants to have Congress be completely irrelevant in how we meet the needs of the American people? No, come on,” Pelosi said Thursday.

Pelosi will sit behind him, but Trump will literally have to face the new House Democratic majority resisting his agenda as he speaks.

Scores of female House Democrats are expected to offer a sea of white in the crowd to show solidarity with suffragettes. A spokeswoman for the chairwoman of the Democratic Women’s Working Group, Rep. Lois FrankelLois Jane FrankelOvernight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Impeachment inquiry overshadows Trump at UN | Veterans push VA to follow through on reforms | Iranian leader open to changes in nuke deal Pelosi to launch formal Trump impeachment inquiry Democrats call on House committees to probe Epstein's 2008 'sweetheart deal,' suicide MORE (D-Fla.), confirmed that female lawmakers are being invited to wear white.

They’ll represent the record number of women elected to Congress with the Democratic wave in November who ran against Trump’s agenda.

Other liberals will make a statement by not being in the room at all.

At least two House Democrats, Congressional Black Caucus members Reps. John LewisJohn LewisThe 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Detroit police chief calls Tlaib facial recognization idea 'racist' Ossoff raises 0k in first three weeks of Senate bid, campaign says MORE (Ga.) and Hank JohnsonHenry (Hank) C. JohnsonThe 13 House Democrats who back Kavanaugh's impeachment Hillary Clinton backs impeachment inquiry into Trump Pelosi announces launch of formal impeachment inquiry into Trump MORE, (Ga.) won’t be attending.

And it’s possible that others will announce boycotts closer to the date. Fourteen Democrats skipped last year’s State of the Union address, including some Democrats who have called for Trump’s impeachment like Reps. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenClimate finance must push net-zero emissions Trump impeachment efforts will haunt the next Democrat in the White House Overnight Energy: Lawmaker, scientists challenge move to eliminate key advisory boards | White House nixes climate language from emissions proposal | Raffle offers deer hunt with Donald Trump Jr. MORE (Texas), Maxine WatersMaxine Moore WatersVideo of fake Trump shooting members of media shown at his Miami resort: report Trump impeachment efforts will haunt the next Democrat in the White House Hillicon Valley: Zuckerberg to testify on Libra | Extremists find home on Telegram app | Warren blasts Facebook for not removing anti-Biden ad | California outlaws facial recognition in police body cameras | China rips US tech sanctions MORE (Calif.) and Steve CohenStephen (Steve) Ira CohenThe Hill's Morning Report - Trump eyes narrowly focused response to Iran attacks Lewandowski, Democrats tangle at testy hearing Trump probes threaten to overshadow Democrats' agenda MORE (Tenn.).

“I have a problem with defiling the Speaker’s chair in the House of Representatives,” Johnson told the Atlanta Journal-Constitution.  “I don’t want to see it lowered, as is what happens when Donald Trump comes to our floor and starts talking about groups of people, particularly Latinos, and disparaging them as a people.”

“I’d rather be somewhere else,” he added.

Other Democrats are trying to send a message with their guests, who will sit in the public galleries overlooking the chamber.

Reps. Bonnie Watson ColemanBonnie Watson ColemanA dozen House Democrats call on EU ambassador to resign amid Ukraine scandal Democrats seize on viral Sharpie hashtags to mock Trump map edit Pelosi asks Democrats for 'leverage' on impeachment MORE (N.J.) and Jimmy GomezJimmy GomezHouse Democrats blur lines on support for impeachment Here are the 95 Democrats who voted to support impeachment Lawmakers call for 'time out' on facial recognition tech MORE (Calif.) invited two immigrants, Victorina Morales and Sandra Diaz, who worked at Trump’s Bedminster, N.J., golf club while they did not have legal status. Diaz is now a legal U.S. resident, while Morales was terminated from her job as a housekeeper in the aftermath of a New York Times report revealing her status.

“I hope that in his State of the Union address, Donald Trump will finally acknowledge the real face of immigrants in this country — women and children fleeing violence, law-abiding, tax-paying people who would do almost anything to be Americans. And if he can’t, I’ve invited Victorina so that he may look her in her eyes to tell his lies to a familiar face,” Watson Coleman said in a statement.

Swalwell, meanwhile, invited Parkland shooting survivor Cameron Kasky, one of the most outspoken student gun control activists since last year’s massacre. Kasky frequently criticizes Trump.

It’s been more than a decade since a sitting president delivered a State of the Union to an audience with so many people angling to unseat him.

When President George W. Bush delivered his address in 2003, he would have peered down at a handful of lawmakers hoping to oust him from power: Sen. John KerryJohn Forbes KerryHe who must not be named: How Hunter Biden became a conversation-stopper Rep. Joe Kennedy has history on his side in Senate bid Green groups line up behind Markey ahead of looming Kennedy fight MORE (D-Mass.), who eventually won the nomination, but also House Minority Leader Dick Gephardt (D-Mo.) and Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio), and Sens. John Edwards (D-N.C.), Bob Graham (D-Fla.) and Joe Lieberman (D-Conn.), who was part of the Democratic ticket that lost to Bush in 2000 after a historic court battle.

Only three members of Congress, former Reps. Michele BachmannMichele Marie BachmannKlobuchar urges CNN town hall audience: 'That's when you guys are supposed to cheer, OK?' Michele Bachmann praises Trump: Americans will 'never see a more godly, biblical president' Will Biden lead a 'return to normalcy' in 2020? MORE (Minn.), Ron Paul (Texas) and Thaddeus McCotter (Mich.), sought the 2012 GOP nomination to unseat then-President Obama.

But at Obama’s 2015 address, he had a cast of characters in the audience who wanted to succeed the two-term president. They included Sens. Marco RubioMarco Antonio RubioFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Five ways Trump's Syria decision spells trouble Rubio criticizes Warren response on same-sex marriage opposition as condescending MORE (R-Fla.), Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzCruz: 'Of course' it's not appropriate to ask China to investigate Bidens Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria O'Rourke raises .5 million in third quarter MORE (R-Texas), Rand PaulRandal (Rand) Howard PaulRand Paul calls for probe of Democrats over Ukraine letter Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria Ana Navarro clashes with Rand Paul in fiery exchange: 'Don't mansplain!' MORE (R-Ky.) and Lindsey GrahamLindsey Olin GrahamFurious Republicans prepare to rebuke Trump on Syria Democrats to offer resolution demanding Trump reverse Syria decision Army officer calls Syria pullback 'a stain on the American conscience' MORE (R-S.C.).

Trump, however, vanquished them all. In fact, during the 2016 campaign, Trump mocked Rubio’s now-infamous State of the Union GOP response where the senator — suffering from a dry mouth — took an awkward sip of water as the cameras rolled.

Those one-time 2016 GOP presidential rivals have now aligned themselves with Trump. And they likely will be applauding many of his lines on Tuesday.

Jordan Fabian contributed.