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Ocasio-Cortez on 2020: ‘I don’t want to be placated as a progressive’

Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOVERNIGHT ENERGY: Democrats push expansion of offshore wind, block offshore drilling with ocean energy bill | Poll: Two-thirds of voters support Biden climate plan | Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Biden plan lags Green New Deal in fighting emissions from homes Ocasio-Cortez rolls out Twitch channel to urge voting MORE (D-N.Y.), a freshman progressive congresswoman, on Thursday said she doesn't know yet who she'll back for the 2020 Democratic presidential nomination.

She said she's watching to see the candidates act on progressive goals.

“I think that we need commitments with teeth, so I don’t want to be placated as a progressive, and I now the progressive movement does not want to be placated in 2020,” she said Thursday on MSNBC’s “MTP Daily.”

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“I want a 2020 candidate that says we can do these things, we can be audacious.”

Ocasio-Cortez, who won her seat in Congress by winning a primary against House Democratic Caucus Chair Joe CrowleyJoseph (Joe) CrowleyHillicon Valley: Election officials prepare for new Russian interference battle | 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy | GOP senators unveil bill to update tech liability protections 'Markeyverse' of online fans helps take down a Kennedy The Hill's Campaign Report: Trump visits Kenosha | Primary day in Massachusetts | GOP eyes Minnesota as a battleground MORE (D-N.Y.) last year, outlined a number of issues that could be sticking points for the progressive wing of the party. 

“I think that it’s really about the comprehensive understanding of this moment that we’re in right now as a country and our ability to articulate it. So I don’t think a 2020 nominee can afford to be bad on issues of race, I don’t think they can afford to be bad on issues of economic justice either,” she said.

“When we talk about things like the role of the labor movement, the role of labor in the working conditions of everyday Americans. When we talk about fighting doggedly for workers, whether it’s wages, whether it’s union jobs, whether it’s good jobs, I think that is what we’re really talking about in fighting for economic justice.” 

Ocasio-Cortez, a self-proclaimed democratic socialist, also mentioned health care, rejecting ideas from potential 2020 contenders Sens. Amy KlobucharAmy KlobucharDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Democrats seem unlikely to move against Feinstein Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D-Minn.) and Sherrod BrownSherrod Campbell BrownInternal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing Dems to focus on issues, not character, at Barrett hearings MORE (D-Ohio) to put Medicare for All on hold and instead bring the age for Medicare down to 50 or 55. 

“For me, I reject that outright. I reject the rationale. I reject the rationale of saying ‘adopting the same insurance models or a similar insurance model to any other developed country in America is unrealistic,’ I reject that. I reject the idea that single payer is impossible, I reject the idea that universal healthcare is impossible. All of these things are possible,” the New York Democrat said.

Several of the high profile Democrats already running in 2020, including Sens. Kamala HarrisKamala HarrisTrump plays video of Biden, Harris talking about fracking at Pennsylvania rally Overnight Defense: US, Russia closer on nuclear treaty extension after Moscow accepts warhead freeze | Khashoggi's fiancee sues Saudi crown prince | Biden nets hundreds more national security endorsements Democrats make gains in Georgia Senate races: poll MORE (D-Calif.), Elizabeth WarrenElizabeth WarrenJustice Department charges Google with illegally maintaining search monopoly Overnight Health Care: Trump takes criticism of Fauci to a new level | GOP Health Committee chairman defends Fauci | Birx confronted Pence about Atlas Senate Democrats call for ramped up Capitol coronavirus testing MORE (D-Mass.), Cory BookerCory Anthony BookerDurbin signals he isn't interested in chairing Judiciary Committee Booker 'outs' Cruz as vegan; Cruz jokingly decries 'scurrilous attack' Why Latinos should oppose Barrett confirmation MORE (D-N.J.) and Kirsten GillibrandKirsten GillibrandInternal Democratic poll: Desiree Tims gains on Mike Turner in Ohio House race Hillicon Valley: Facebook, Twitter's handling of New York Post article raises election night concerns | FCC to move forward with considering order targeting tech's liability shield | YouTube expands polices to tackle QAnon Democrats question Amazon over reported interference of workers' rights to organize MORE (D-N.Y.), will have to grapple with progressive ideas within the party. 

Some of Ocasio-Cortez’s most ardent supporters have floated her as a presidential candidate, though at 29 she would not be old enough to run for the White House until 2024.