Pelosi, Dem leaders urge Omar to apologize for 'anti-Semitic' tweet

House Democratic leaders, led by Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy Patricia D'Alesandro PelosiTlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution 5 things to watch as Trump, Dems clash over investigations GOP lawmaker: Trump has engaged in multiple actions that 'meet the threshold for impeachment' MORE (Calif.), on Monday accused Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarOmar introduces bill sanctioning Brunei over anti-homosexuality law GOP launches anti-BDS discharge petition Hoyer: Dems will move quickly on anti-Israel boycott bill MORE (D-Minn.) of using "anti-Semitic tropes" and called on her to apologize after she sent tweets suggesting that lawmakers defending Israel were motivated by money.

“We are and will always be strong supporters of Israel in Congress because we understand that our support is based on shared values and strategic interests," the top officials of the House Democratic leadership said in a rare joint statement. "Legitimate criticism of Israel’s policies is protected by the values of free speech and democratic debate that the United States and Israel share."

Along with Pelosi, the statement was co-signed by Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton Hoyer5 things to watch as Trump, Dems clash over investigations GOP lawmaker: Trump has engaged in multiple actions that 'meet the threshold for impeachment' Maxine Waters: Parts of Trump immigration plan are 'very racist' MORE (Md.), Majority Whip James Clyburn (S.C.), Assistant Speaker Ben Ray Luján (N.M.), Caucus Chairman Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesThe CASE Act is an opportunity for creators to have rights and remedies Dems struggle to make Trump bend on probes Black caucus leader Karen Bass finds herself in high demand MORE (N.Y.) and Caucus Vice Chairwoman Katherine ClarkKatherine Marlea ClarkPelosi calls for investments in child care, early education A workplace safety solution Anita Hill would be proud of Senate Dems put brakes on Trump impeachment talk MORE (Mass.) said in the statement.

"But Congresswoman Omar’s use of anti-Semitic tropes and prejudicial accusations about Israel’s supporters is deeply offensive. We condemn these remarks and we call upon Congresswoman Omar to immediately apologize for these hurtful comments," they wrote.

Pelosi added in a tweet that she spoke directly to Omar on Monday.
 
"In our conversation today, Congresswoman Omar and I agreed that we must use this moment to move forward as we reject anti-Semitism in all forms," Pelosi wrote.
 
Omar on Sunday retweeted journalist Glenn Greenwald responding to a story about House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyOn The Money: Treasury rejects Dem subpoena for Trump tax returns | Companies warn trade war about to hit consumers | Congress, White House to launch budget talks next week | Trump gets deal to lift steel tariffs on Mexico, Canada Congressional leaders to launch budget talks with White House RNC chair on Alabama abortion bill: I would have exceptions for rape, incest MORE (R-Calif.) promising "action" regarding her and Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibTlaib calls on Amash to join impeachment resolution Rep. Tlaib is wrong — Jews were never given 'a safe haven' in Palestine Tlaib becomes first Muslim woman to preside over House MORE (D-Mich.) over their views critical of Israel.

"It's all about the Benjamins baby," Omar wrote, referring to money.

Omar then tweeted that AIPAC was paying American politicians to support Israel. She was referring to the American Israeli Public Affairs Committee, a powerful nonprofit advocacy organization that doesn't directly donate to political candidates. AIPAC does, however, sponsor regular congressional delegations to Israel.

Omar, one of the first Muslim women elected to Congress, faced widespread condemnation from fellow Democrats for her comments.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.), who is Jewish, issued a lengthy statement saying that Omar's comments were "deeply hurtful and offensive."

"While of course our nation’s leaders are free to debate the relative influence of a particular organization on our country’s policy-making process, or the factors that make our system of governance imperfect, there is an expectation of leaders — particularly those with a demonstrated commitment to the cause of justice and equality — that they would be extremely careful not to tread into the waters of anti-Semitism or any other form of prejudice or hate. Rep. Omar failed that test of leadership with these comments," Nadler said.

House Foreign Affairs Committee Chairman Eliot EngelEliot Lance EngelHoyer: Dems will move quickly on anti-Israel boycott bill Trump faces criticism for hosting Hungary's leader This week: Barr back in hot seat over Mueller report MORE (D-N.Y.), who is also Jewish, similarly accused Omar of invoking an "anti-Semitic trope." Omar is a member of the Foreign Affairs Committee.

"I fully expect that when we disagree on the Foreign Affairs Committee, we will debate policy on the merits and never question members’ motives or resort to personal attacks," Engel said in a statement.

McCarthy pledged on Monday that House Republicans would take action this week "to ensure the House speaks out against this hatred and stands with Israel and the Jewish people." McCarthy's office didn't immediately clarify what exactly that action would entail.

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinGOP lawmaker slams Pelosi over response to Tlaib controversy GOP lawmaker slams Pelosi after imam critical of Israel delivers House invocation Long Island rep wishes Billy Joel happy birthday on House floor MORE (R-N.Y.), who is Jewish, introduced a resolution last month condemning anti-Semitism that specifically cites previous comments from Omar and Tlaib about Israel.

Omar had previously come under fire over a 2012 tweet amid the Gaza War in which she wrote: “Israel has hypnotized the world, may Allah awaken the people and help them see the evil doings of Israel. #Gaza #Palestine #Israel.”

Omar backtracked last month, writing in a tweet, "It’s now apparent to me that I spent lots of energy putting my 2012 tweet in context and little energy is disavowing the anti-semitic trope I unknowingly used, which is unfortunate and offensive."