Dems introduce bill to take gender-specific terms out of tax code to make it LGBT-inclusive

A bill introduced by two Democratic lawmakers Thursday would update the U.S. tax code to remove gender-specific references such as “husband” and “wife” and would replace the terms with “spouse” in an effort to be LGBT-inclusive.

Reps. Judy ChuJudy May ChuMinority caucuses call for quick action on police reform House Democrats press Treasury on debit cards used for coronavirus relief payments Democrats blast CDC report on minorities and COVID-19 MORE (D-Calif.) and Andy LevinAndrew (Andy) LevinHouse members race to prepare for first-ever remote votes Warren, Levin introduce legislation for federal contact tracing program Johns Hopkins offering free class in how to become a contact tracer MORE (D-Mich.) said in a press release announcing the legislation that the tax code is outdated and does not reflect marriage equality.

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“Tax filing is often difficult enough already without also making LGBTQ families feel prejudiced against,” Chu said. “This is a simple and common sense fix that acknowledges LGBTQ couples as equals. The Supreme Court has recognized that love is love, no matter your gender identity. It’s time our tax code does the same.”

Sen. Ron WydenRonald (Ron) Lee WydenCBO releases analysis on extending increased unemployment benefits Overnight Health Care: Hydroxychloroquine ineffective in preventing COVID-19, study finds | WHO to resume hydroxychloroquine clinical research | WHO says no evidence coronavirus is mutating Bipartisan lawmakers press Trump administration to get COVID-19 aid to Medicaid providers MORE (D-Ore.) is introducing the bill’s Senate version.

“The tax code still reflects the discrimination of a bygone era. It’s past time for that to change,” he told NBC News.

Levin said the bill, titled “Equal Dignity for Married Taxpayers Act,” was introduced on Valentine’s Day intentionally as a celebration of love for all.

“Today, as Americans celebrate Valentine’s Day, I introduced this bill to make simple, common sense changes to our tax code so that it accurately represents all people to whom it applies,” he said.

Levin took over his father’s seat in Congress in 2019 and introduced the bill that is similar to ones his father Sandy proposed several times before.