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Former GOP House Intel chair: McConnell eating 'manure sandwich' with Trump's national emergency

A former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee says that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellKlain on Manchin's objection to Neera Tanden: He 'doesn't answer to us at the White House' Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Murkowski undecided on Tanden as nomination in limbo MORE (R-Ky.) is eating a "manure sandwich" over President TrumpDonald TrumpSenators given no timeline on removal of National Guard, Capitol fence Democratic fury with GOP explodes in House Georgia secretary of state withholds support for 'reactionary' GOP voting bills MORE's decision to declare a national emergency over illegal border crossings while signing a deal to keep the federal government open.

Former Rep. Mike RogersMichael (Mike) Dennis RogersOvernight Defense: One-third of service members decline coronavirus vaccine | Biden to take executive action in response to Solar Winds hack | US, Japan reach cost sharing agreement DOD says nearly one third of service members are declining COVID-19 vaccine Overnight Defense: Pentagon, Congress appoint panel members to rename Confederate bases | Military approves 20 more coronavirus vaccination teams MORE (R-Mich.) told CNN on Friday that McConnell was not happy to endorse Trump's plan to declare a national emergency in order to reallocate funding for construction of a border wall.

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“You’re watching Mitch McConnell eat a manure sandwich in this whole process," Rogers said, adding that McConnell was most concerned with averting another government shutdown.

"You can tell, in the mannerisms, in the body language, in the language itself, of Mitch McConnell ... he's where he is because he thought it would be expedient to make sure the government didn't shut down," he added.

"He's not yet enjoying that manure sandwich this morning," he quipped again, moments later.

McConnell announced Thursday that Trump planned to sign a compromise bill engineered by House and Senate negotiators that would provide $1.375 billion in funding for barriers at the U.S.-Mexico border, while at the same time declaring a national emergency to speed construction of his long-promised border wall.

Despite previously expressing skepticism for the plan, McConnell announced Thursday that he would support the president's move.

"I think he ought to feel free to use whatever tools he can legally use to enhance his effort to secure the border, so no I would not be troubled by that," the Senate leader told reporters.