Former GOP House Intel chair: McConnell eating 'manure sandwich' with Trump's national emergency

A former chairman of the House Intelligence Committee says that Senate Majority Leader Mitch McConnellAddison (Mitch) Mitchell McConnellGOP rep to introduce constitutional amendment to limit Supreme Court seats to 9 The Hill's Morning Report - Dems contemplate big election and court reforms Court-packing becomes new litmus test on left MORE (R-Ky.) is eating a "manure sandwich" over President TrumpDonald John TrumpDem lawmaker says Electoral College was 'conceived' as way to perpetuate slavery Stanley Cup champion Washington Capitals to visit White House on Monday Transportation Dept requests formal audit of Boeing 737 Max certification MORE's decision to declare a national emergency over illegal border crossings while signing a deal to keep the federal government open.

Former Rep. Mike RogersMichael (Mike) Dennis RogersWhy states should push forward with cyber laws Getting real about Huawei Ex-House Intel chair: Intel panel is wrong forum to investigate Trump's finances MORE (R-Mich.) told CNN on Friday that McConnell was not happy to endorse Trump's plan to declare a national emergency in order to reallocate funding for construction of a border wall.

ADVERTISEMENT

“You’re watching Mitch McConnell eat a manure sandwich in this whole process," Rogers said, adding that McConnell was most concerned with averting another government shutdown.

"You can tell, in the mannerisms, in the body language, in the language itself, of Mitch McConnell ... he's where he is because he thought it would be expedient to make sure the government didn't shut down," he added.

"He's not yet enjoying that manure sandwich this morning," he quipped again, moments later.

McConnell announced Thursday that Trump planned to sign a compromise bill engineered by House and Senate negotiators that would provide $1.375 billion in funding for barriers at the U.S.-Mexico border, while at the same time declaring a national emergency to speed construction of his long-promised border wall.

Despite previously expressing skepticism for the plan, McConnell announced Thursday that he would support the president's move.

"I think he ought to feel free to use whatever tools he can legally use to enhance his effort to secure the border, so no I would not be troubled by that," the Senate leader told reporters.