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House to vote on background check bills next week

The House is set to vote on legislation next week to enhance background checks for gun purchases as Democrats seek to move quickly on a top priority since taking the majority.

Democrats expect to consider measures to require universal background checks and address the so-called Charleston loophole that allowed the shooter in the 2015 massacre at a historic black church to buy a gun, a spokeswoman for House Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerDemocrats fear they are running out of time on Biden agenda Tech industry pushes for delay in antitrust legislation Biden signs Juneteenth bill: 'Great nations don't ignore their most painful moments' MORE (D-Md.) confirmed.

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Democratic leaders are moving swiftly to pass the bills following the House Judiciary Committee's approval of both measures on Feb. 13.

The Judiciary Committee votes came a day before the first anniversary of the shooting at Marjory Stoneman Douglas High School in Parkland, Fla., which killed 17 people.

Both bills are expected to pass on the House floor largely along party lines with limited support from Republicans.

The first measure, sponsored by Reps. Mike ThompsonCharles (Mike) Michael ThompsonHouse Democrats introduce bill to close existing gun loopholes and prevent mass shootings Giffords group unveils gun violence memorial on National Mall Democrats urge Biden to take executive action on assault-style firearms MORE (D-Calif.) and Pete KingPeter (Pete) KingNewsmax anchor Greg Kelly to host New York radio show Top GOP lawmakers call for Swalwell to be removed from Intelligence Committee Republican Garbarino wins election to replace retiring Rep. Pete King MORE (R-N.Y.), would expand the federal background check system to cover sales at gun shows or online.

Current law only requires licensed firearms dealers to run background checks before granting a gun sale. The new legislation would mandate people wishing to transfer a gun to visit a licensed firearms dealer to conduct a background check.

The bill does grant exemptions for gifts between family members and temporary transfers for use at a shooting range or for hunting.

Thompson and King's bill is titled the Bipartisan Background Checks Act, but its bipartisan support is not widespread. Only five Republicans have co-sponsored the measure: Reps. Brian FitzpatrickBrian K. FitzpatrickBiden's corporate tax hike is bad for growth — try a carbon tax instead Centrists gain foothold in infrastructure talks; cyber attacks at center of Biden-Putin meeting Overnight Health Care: Takeaways on the Supreme Court's Obamacare decision | COVID-19 cost 5.5 million years of American life | Biden administration investing billions in antiviral pills for COVID-19 MORE (Pa.), Brian MastBrian Jeffrey MastBipartisan lawmakers introduce bill targeting Hamas financing, citing bitcoin donations House GOP fights back against mask, metal detector fines Massie, Greene trash mask violation warnings from House sergeant at arms MORE (Fla.), Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonFauci: Emails highlight confusion about Trump administration's mixed messages early in pandemic Why Republican politicians are sticking with Trump Progressives nearly tank House Democrats' Capitol security bill MORE (Mich.), Chris SmithChristopher (Chris) Henry SmithThe Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Senate path uncertain after House approves Jan. 6 panel The Hill's Morning Report — Presented by Facebook — Biden delivers 100 million shots in 58 days, doses to neighbors The eight Republicans who voted to tighten background checks on guns MORE (N.J.) and King.

The second bill, authored by House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.), would lengthen the review period for a gun sale. King is also a co-sponsor, as well as Rep. Joe CunninghamJoseph CunninghamJoe Cunningham to enter race for South Carolina governor Republicans race for distance from 'America First Caucus' Lobbying world MORE (D-S.C.).

Current law allows a gun sale to proceed if a background check isn't complete within three days. Clyburn's bill would extend the review period to 10 days and allow a buyer to request a review if the background check hasn't been done by then. The gun sale can go forward if another 10 days go by without a response from the background check system.

The bill is meant to address the flaws in communication between local law enforcement and a federal background check system examiner that allowed the Charleston shooter to buy a gun.

The examiner had not seen an incident report stating that the shooter, Dylann Roof, admitted to possessing drugs. That report would have otherwise prevented Roof from buying a gun.

House Republicans did pass some measures in response to mass violence when they held the majority, but none went as far as the gun control proposals Democrats are pursuing. They included enacting penalties against agencies that fail to report to the background check system and providing security grants to schools.