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Whip List: Where Republicans stand on emergency declaration vote

Republicans are being forced to go on the record over whether they back President Trump's emergency declaration to secure more money for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The House in February passed a resolution sponsored by Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) that would terminate the emergency declaration.

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Democrats voted unanimously for the measure. Republican leaders worked to limit defections and saw 13 GOP lawmakers join with Democrats.

Now attention is on the upper chamber, where nine Senate Republicans have said they will join Democrats to send the resolution to Trump's desk.

Trump is expected to veto any resolution to terminate his emergency declaration. Neither chamber is expected to have the two-thirds needed to override a veto.

Here's where key Republicans stand on the Democratic resolution.

 

Last updated on March 14 at 2:35 p.m. Recent updates: Sens. Rob Portman (Ohio), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranGraham: Trump will 'be helpful' to all Senate GOP incumbents The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Biden vs. Trump, part II Passage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy MORE (Kan.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Mike Lee (R-Utah).

Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

  

 

SENATE

YES (9)

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)

Alexander called taking funds appropriated for the military "inconsistent with the United States Constitution that I took an oath to support and defend."

 

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine)

Collins told reporters in Maine that "if it's a clean disapproval resolution, I will support it."

 

Sen. Mike Lee (Utah)

Lee said he would vote for the disapproval resolution. “We tried to cut a deal, the President didn’t appear interested,” he said.

 

Sen. Jerry Moran (Kan.)

"I share President Trump's goal of securing our borders, but expanding the powers of the presidency beyond its constitutional limits is something I cannot support," Moran said in a tweet the day of the vote.

 

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

"I will be voting 'yes' on the resolution of disapproval," Murkowski told reporters.

 

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.)

"I can’t vote to give the president the power to spend money that hasn’t been appropriated by Congress,” he said.

 

Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio)

Portman warned on the Senate floor that Trump’s emergency declaration will set “a dangerous new precedent counter to a fundamental constitutional principle” and lead to a prolonged court battle.

 

Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah)

Romney said he would vote for the resolution. "This is a vote for the constitution and for the balance of powers that is at its core," he said in a statement.

  

Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.)

“I think the separation of powers if very important so I think it was a mistake for the president to use this mechanism to fund it,” Toomey said hours before the vote.

  

UNDECIDED (9)

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntPartisan headwinds threaten Capitol riot commission Passage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Microsoft, FireEye push for breach reporting rules after SolarWinds hack MORE (Mo.)

Blunt, a member of leadership, has declined to say how he will vote, telling reporters that he wanted to know what "options" Republicans would have. 

 

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzNoem touts South Dakota coronavirus response, knocks lockdowns in CPAC speech Sunday shows preview: 2024 hopefuls gather at CPAC; House passes coronavirus relief; vaccine effort continues Texas attorney general hits links with Trump before CPAC appearance MORE (Texas)

Cruz said he's still weighing the administration's arguments, but has voiced concerns that Trump's actions set up a "slippery slope" for future presidents. 

 

Sen. Cory Gardner (Colo.)

Gardner said in a statement to The Denver Post that he was reviewing Trump's actions but "Congress is most appropriately situated to fund border security." Gardner declined to comment further on Monday, saying he has said “all I’m going to say.”

  

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonLoeffler leaves door open to 2022 rematch against Warnock Perdue on potential 2022 run: GOP must regain the Senate Bottom line MORE (Ga.)

Isakson told reporters on Tuesday that he had not made a decision about how he would vote.

 

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordRepublicans see Becerra as next target in confirmation wars Overnight Health Care: US surpasses half a million COVID deaths | House panel advances Biden's .9T COVID-19 aid bill | Johnson & Johnson ready to provide doses for 20M Americans by end of March 11 GOP senators slam Biden pick for health secretary: 'No meaningful experience' MORE (Okla.)

Lankford said he has not made a decision, noting that senators haven’t yet seen details on where Trump will pull money from.

   

Sen. Martha McSally (Ariz.)

McSally told reporters in Tucson, Ariz., that she was reviewing Trump's declaration and that her staff was talking to the White House. 

 

  

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Rubio hasn't said how he would vote but said in a statement shortly before Trump's announcement that "no crisis justifies violating the Constitution" and he was "skeptical" he could support the president's actions. 

 

Sen. Ben Sasse (Neb.)

Sasse told National Review that while there is a "crisis" at the border, "as a Constitutional conservative I don’t want a future Democratic President unilaterally rewriting gun laws or climate policy."

   

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerPassage of the John Lewis Voting Rights Advancement Act is the first step to heal our democracy Overnight Health Care: US surpasses half a million COVID deaths | House panel advances Biden's .9T COVID-19 aid bill | Johnson & Johnson ready to provide doses for 20M Americans by end of March 11 GOP senators slam Biden pick for health secretary: 'No meaningful experience' MORE (Miss.)

Wicker declined to say how he would vote on the resolution, telling reporters that he could make a statement in the coming days. 

 

 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO BACKED THE RESOLUTION (13)

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.)

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.)

Rep. Mike Gallagher (Wis.)

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.)

Rep. Will Hurd (Texas)

Rep. Dusty Johnson (S.D.)

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieCan members of Congress carry firearms on the Capitol complex? Republicans rally to keep Cheney in power House Republicans gear up for conference meeting amid party civil war MORE (Ky.)

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersHillicon Valley: Biden signs order on chips | Hearing on media misinformation | Facebook's deal with Australia | CIA nominee on SolarWinds Democrats' letter targeting Fox, Newsmax for misinformation sparks clash during hearing House panel to dive into misinformation debate MORE (Wash.)

Rep. Francis RooneyLaurence (Francis) Francis RooneyGrowing number of House Republicans warm to proxy voting Lawmakers express concern about lack of young people in federal workforce The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Mastercard - Today: Vaccine distribution starts, Electoral College meets. MORE (Fla.)

Rep. Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerGOP puts pressure on Pelosi over Swalwell House Republicans who didn't sign onto the Texas lawsuit House Judiciary Republicans mockingly tweet 'Happy Birthday' to Hillary Clinton after Barrett confirmation MORE (Wis.)

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.)

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonUpton censured for vote to remove Marjorie Taylor Greene from Education Committee Is the 'civil war' in the Republican Party really over? Michigan GOP committee deadlocks on resolution to censure Meijer over impeachment vote MORE (Mich.)

Rep. Greg Walden (Ore.)

    

 

Dorothy Mills-Gregg contributed.