Whip List: Where Republicans stand on emergency declaration vote

Republicans are being forced to go on the record over whether they back President Trump's emergency declaration to secure more money for a wall along the U.S.-Mexico border.

The House in February passed a resolution sponsored by Rep. Joaquin Castro (D-Texas) that would terminate the emergency declaration.

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Democrats voted unanimously for the measure. Republican leaders worked to limit defections and saw 13 GOP lawmakers join with Democrats.

Now attention is on the upper chamber, where nine Senate Republicans have said they will join Democrats to send the resolution to Trump's desk.

Trump is expected to veto any resolution to terminate his emergency declaration. Neither chamber is expected to have the two-thirds needed to override a veto.

Here's where key Republicans stand on the Democratic resolution.

 

Last updated on March 14 at 2:35 p.m. Recent updates: Sens. Rob Portman (Ohio), Pat Toomey (Pa.), Jerry MoranGerald (Jerry) MoranMcConnell signaling Trump trial to be quick, if it happens Overnight Defense — Presented by Huntington Ingalls Industries — Furor over White House readout of Ukraine call | Dems seize on memo in impeachment push | Senate votes to end Trump emergency | Congress gets briefing on Iran Senate again votes to end Trump emergency declaration on border wall MORE (Kan.), Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.), Mitt Romney (R-Utah) and Mike Lee (R-Utah).

Please send updates to mmali@thehill.com.

  

 

SENATE

YES (9)

Sen. Lamar Alexander (R-Tenn.)

Alexander called taking funds appropriated for the military "inconsistent with the United States Constitution that I took an oath to support and defend."

 

Sen. Susan Collins (Maine)

Collins told reporters in Maine that "if it's a clean disapproval resolution, I will support it."

 

Sen. Mike Lee (Utah)

Lee said he would vote for the disapproval resolution. “We tried to cut a deal, the President didn’t appear interested,” he said.

 

Sen. Jerry Moran (Kan.)

"I share President Trump's goal of securing our borders, but expanding the powers of the presidency beyond its constitutional limits is something I cannot support," Moran said in a tweet the day of the vote.

 

Sen. Lisa Murkowski (Alaska)

"I will be voting 'yes' on the resolution of disapproval," Murkowski told reporters.

 

Sen. Rand Paul (Ky.)

"I can’t vote to give the president the power to spend money that hasn’t been appropriated by Congress,” he said.

 

Sen. Rob Portman (Ohio)

Portman warned on the Senate floor that Trump’s emergency declaration will set “a dangerous new precedent counter to a fundamental constitutional principle” and lead to a prolonged court battle.

 

Sen. Mitt Romney (Utah)

Romney said he would vote for the resolution. "This is a vote for the constitution and for the balance of powers that is at its core," he said in a statement.

  

Sen. Pat Toomey (Pa.)

“I think the separation of powers if very important so I think it was a mistake for the president to use this mechanism to fund it,” Toomey said hours before the vote.

  

UNDECIDED (9)

Sen. Roy BluntRoy Dean BluntSenators take fundraising efforts to Nats playoff games Senate Intelligence report triggers new calls for action on election security Sunday shows - Second whistleblower grabs spotlight MORE (Mo.)

Blunt, a member of leadership, has declined to say how he will vote, telling reporters that he wanted to know what "options" Republicans would have. 

 

Sen. Ted CruzRafael (Ted) Edward CruzThe Hill's Morning Report - Lawmakers return to work as Dem candidates set to debate Cruz: 'Of course' it's not appropriate to ask China to investigate Bidens Sunday Show Preview: Trump's allies and administration defend decision on Syria MORE (Texas)

Cruz said he's still weighing the administration's arguments, but has voiced concerns that Trump's actions set up a "slippery slope" for future presidents. 

 

Sen. Cory Gardner (Colo.)

Gardner said in a statement to The Denver Post that he was reviewing Trump's actions but "Congress is most appropriately situated to fund border security." Gardner declined to comment further on Monday, saying he has said “all I’m going to say.”

  

Sen. Johnny IsaksonJohnny IsaksonJoe Lieberman's son running for Senate in Georgia Poll: Majority of independent voters want GOP to retain control of Senate in 2020 Embracing President Mike Pence might be GOP's best play MORE (Ga.)

Isakson told reporters on Tuesday that he had not made a decision about how he would vote.

 

Sen. James LankfordJames Paul LankfordMcConnell support for election security funds leaves Dems declaring victory Election security funds passed by Senate seen as welcome first step Senate committee approves 0 million for state election security efforts MORE (Okla.)

Lankford said he has not made a decision, noting that senators haven’t yet seen details on where Trump will pull money from.

   

Sen. Martha McSally (Ariz.)

McSally told reporters in Tucson, Ariz., that she was reviewing Trump's declaration and that her staff was talking to the White House. 

 

  

Sen. Marco Rubio (Fla.)

Rubio hasn't said how he would vote but said in a statement shortly before Trump's announcement that "no crisis justifies violating the Constitution" and he was "skeptical" he could support the president's actions. 

 

Sen. Ben Sasse (Neb.)

Sasse told National Review that while there is a "crisis" at the border, "as a Constitutional conservative I don’t want a future Democratic President unilaterally rewriting gun laws or climate policy."

   

Sen. Roger WickerRoger Frederick WickerHillicon Valley: Trump official declines to testify on trade protections for tech | Senators call for better info-sharing on supply chain threats | Apple pulls app after Chinese pressure Key Democrat presses FTC over Facebook settlement's 'dangerous precedent' Cyber rules for self-driving cars stall in Congress MORE (Miss.)

Wicker declined to say how he would vote on the resolution, telling reporters that he could make a statement in the coming days. 

 

 

HOUSE REPUBLICANS WHO BACKED THE RESOLUTION (13)

Rep. Justin Amash (Mich.)

Rep. Brian Fitzpatrick (Pa.)

Rep. Mike Gallagher (Wis.)

Rep. Jaime Herrera Beutler (Wash.)

Rep. Will Hurd (Texas)

Rep. Dusty Johnson (S.D.)

Rep. Thomas MassieThomas Harold MassieO'Rourke gun confiscation talk alarms Democrats Scalise blasts Democratic legislation on gun reforms Airports already have plenty of infrastructure funding MORE (Ky.)

Rep. Cathy McMorris RodgersCathy McMorris RodgersSocial determinants of health — health care isn't just bugs and bacteria Lawmakers deride FTC settlement as weak on Facebook Overnight Energy: Fight over fuel standards intensifies | Democrats grill Trump officials over rule rollback | California official blasts EPA chief over broken talks | Former EPA official says Wheeler lied to Congress MORE (Wash.)

Rep. Francis RooneyLaurence (Francis) Francis RooneyMomentum is growing to fight climate change by pricing carbon Bill Weld on climate change: Let the market decide Overnight Energy: House moves to block Trump drilling | House GOP rolls out proposal to counter offshore drilling ban | calls mount for NOAA probe MORE (Fla.)

Rep. Jim SensenbrennerFrank (Jim) James SensenbrennerHere are the lawmakers who aren't seeking reelection in 2020 Republicans pour cold water on Trump's term limit idea Trump calls on House Republicans to let committee chairs stay on the job longer MORE (Wis.)

Rep. Elise Stefanik (N.Y.)

Rep. Fred UptonFrederick (Fred) Stephen UptonGOP group calls out five House Republicans to speak up on Ukraine House passes bill to revamp medical screenings for migrants at border Energy efficiency cannot be a partisan issue for Washington MORE (Mich.)

Rep. Greg Walden (Ore.)

    

 

Dorothy Mills-Gregg contributed.