Push for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems

Push for ‘Medicare for all’ worries centrist Dems
© Greg Nash

Centrist Democrats who helped their party win back the House majority with victories in key swing districts last fall are sounding the alarm that the liberal push for “Medicare for all” could haunt them as they try to defend their seats and keep control of the House. 

Instead, these moderates — many of whom will face tough reelection bids in 2020 — are pressing their party leaders to work with President TrumpDonald John TrumpNew Bob Woodward book will include details of 25 personal letters between Trump and Kim Jong Un On The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Biden commemorates anniversary of Charlottesville 'Unite the Right' rally: 'We are in a battle for the soul of our nation' MORE and Republicans to deliver to voters back home a bipartisan victory on lowering prescription drug prices and other health efforts rather than focus on an aspirational Medicare for all messaging bill.

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Already, Republican campaign operatives are trying to paint Democrats with a broad brush, linking vulnerable lawmakers in conservative-leaning districts with liberal colleagues pushing for a single-payer health care system. A new poll out Tuesday revealed that 64 percent of voters surveyed believed that Democrats back socialism. 

“We’ve got extremists who want to shoot the moon. Some policies would be wonderful, but you’re not going to get them out of the Senate and you’re not going to get them out of the White House,” said one House Democrat who represents a district won by Trump in 2016 and who wants the new Congress to tackle drug pricing first.

“It’s messaging versus action. I think we should go for action,” the lawmaker said. “And if we’re going to win as Democrats next time around, we better show that we can govern too. If we are just going to obstruct for the sake of it, that’s not going to help us keep the majority and certainly not going to win us the White House.”

Some freshmen Democrats who defeated incumbent Republicans last November also poured cold water on the Medicare for all bill, which Progressive Caucus Co-Chair Pramila JayapalPramila JayapalSanders offers bill to tax billionaires' wealth gains during pandemic Matt Stoller: Big tech House grilling the most important hearing on corporate power since the 1930s Hillicon Valley: House panel grills tech CEOs during much anticipated antitrust hearing | TikTok to make code public as it pushes back against 'misinformation' | House Intel panel expands access to foreign disinformation evidence MORE (D-Wash.) and Rep. Debbie DingellDeborah (Debbie) Ann DingellMichigan Rep. Debbie Dingell easily wins House primary Court orders release of Black Michigan teen who was jailed for missing schoolwork Lobbying world MORE (D-Mich.) plan to unveil on Wednesday with more than 100 co-sponsors. The idea has been championed by democratic socialists such as Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezOcasio-Cortez's 2nd grade teacher tells her 'you've got this' ahead of DNC speech New poll shows Markey with wide lead over Kennedy in Massachusetts Ocasio-Cortez celebrates 'squad' primary victories: 'The people triumphed' MORE (D-N.Y.) and Sen. Bernie SandersBernie SandersOcasio-Cortez's 2nd grade teacher tells her 'you've got this' ahead of DNC speech Trump and allies grapple with how to target Harris Chris Wallace: Kamala Harris 'not far to the left despite what Republicans are gonna try to say' MORE (I-Vt.), who has launched another presidential bid.

“My strong preference is to do what can be done, which is something that can garner enough support to actually pass. We know that is not going to be a transformation of our health care system, although there are strong arguments for attempting that in the coming years,” Rep. Tom MalinowskiThomas (Tom) MalinowskiNew Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries Thomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski House fires back at Trump by passing ObamaCare expansion MORE (D-N.J.) told The Hill on Tuesday.

Malinowski, a former Obama administration official, aggressively campaigned last cycle on protecting the Affordable Care Act — a tactic which helped him unseat GOP Rep. Leonard LanceLeonard LanceThomas Kean wins GOP primary to take on Rep. Tom Malinowski Gun debate to shape 2020 races GOP fears Trump backlash in suburbs MORE.

The New Jersey Democrat said he doesn’t care whether the House quickly turns to bipartisan efforts to lower drug prices, protect patients with pre-existing conditions or stabilize the ObamaCare marketplace, adding: “Any of those is a good place to start.”

Trump has repeatedly invoked cutting drug prices as one key area where he could work with Democrats, particularly in this new era of divided government. Health and Human Services Secretary Alex Azar, a former pharmaceutical company executive, has been meeting on Capitol Hill with party leaders and committee chairs on the issue.

At a Senate Finance Committee hearing on Tuesday, Republicans and Democrats alike grilled executives from seven major drug companies over the high cost of prescription drugs.

Meanwhile, another centrist freshman, Rep. Dean PhillipsDean PhillipsMinnesota Rep. Dean Phillips wins primary Leaders call for civility after GOP lawmaker's verbal attack on Ocasio-Cortez House seeks ways to honor John Lewis MORE (D-Minn.), said he’s participated in behind-the-scenes talks on drug pricing among members of the bipartisan Problem Solvers Caucus, led by Reps. Josh GottheimerJoshua (Josh) GottheimerThe Hill's Campaign Report: Florida's coronavirus surge raises questions about GOP convention New Jersey Rep. Gottheimer wins House primary New Jersey incumbents steamroll progressive challengers in primaries MORE (D-N.J.) and Tom ReedThomas (Tom) W. ReedHouse approves two child care bills aimed at pandemic Diabetes Caucus co-chairs say telehealth expansion to continue beyond pandemic The Hill's 12:30 Report - Presented by Facebook - Mnuchin previews GOP coronavirus relief package MORE (R-N.Y.).

“My preference is a simple one, which is to work with our Republican friends across the aisle to identify shared desired outcomes and then work our way backward,” Phillips, who defeated GOP Rep. Erik PaulsenErik Philip PaulsenMinnesota Rep. Dean Phillips wins primary Pass USMCA Coalition drops stance on passing USMCA Two swing-district Democrats raise impeachment calls after whistleblower reports MORE last fall, said in an interview. “I’m disappointed that we have a system here that doesn’t promote more of that kind of collaboration. We focus on tactics; therefore, we never reach the outcomes that we all want.”

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Asked if he’ll co-sponsor’s Jayapal’s legislation, Phillips replied, “I respect it. Our party is a big tent. Anybody who throws out ideas, I have respect for.”

Two-term Rep. Tom O’Halleran (D-Ariz.), who’s district Trump narrowly won in 2016, made clear he won’t sign on to Jayapal’s Medicare bill. Neither will Rep. Scott PetersScott H. PetersLobbying world The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by The American Investment Council - Trump, Pence tested, in more ways than one House Democrats press Pelosi for automatic unemployment insurance and food stamp extensions MORE (D-Calif.), a leader of the pro-trade New Democrat Coalition, nor freshman Rep. Abigail SpanbergerAbigail Davis SpanbergerDemocrats go big on diversity with new House recruits Republicans choose Frietas to challenge Spangberger for Virginia congressional seat Over 570 women registered to run for office, topping 2018 record MORE (D-Va.), who beat Freedom Caucus Rep. Dave Brat (R) last year in a central Virginia district that Trump carried by 6 percentage points.

Spanberger is backing an expanded public option for health insurance, a less drastic approach than Medicare for all.

“I support the public option because I think it’s a great way for people to have access to a Medicare-like program without forcing them to do it,” Spanberger said in an interview just off the House floor. “I support the goal of universal coverage, but I think the public option is the workable way for getting people the coverage for what they should have.”

O’Halleran, a leader of the centrist Blue Dog Coalition, said he is unconcerned if the House GOP’s campaign arm tries to portray him as a socialist in the 2020 cycle.

“Whatever they want to do, they will do whether I vote for it or not,” O’Halleran said. “But we owe it to the people of America not to rush into it. Conceptually, making sure everybody has health care is a good idea, but there is not any consensus in the caucus yet on the direction.”

Told there are more than 100 co-sponsors on the Jayapal bill, O’Halleran said, “They are pretty short of a majority there.”

But not all vulnerable moderate Democrats are rejecting Medicare for all. Another Arizona Democrat, Rep. Ann KirkpatrickAnn KirkpatrickArizona Rep. Tom O'Halleran wins Democratic primary Arizona Rep. Ann Kirkpatrick wins Democratic primary Cook shifts 20 House districts toward Democrats MORE, who succeeded Republican Martha McSallyMartha Elizabeth McSallyMcConnell warns control of Senate 'could go either way' in November The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden picks Harris as running mate Progressive Jewish group endorses Biden MORE, told The Hill she’s signing on to the Jayapal bill after consulting with her daughter, who is a physician.

“I called her and asked, ‘Where are you on Medicare for all?’ And she said, ‘Absolutely, I support it,’ ” Kirkpatrick recalled. “She said everybody should be on Medicare, most of her patients are Medicare patients, it’s a good system, people like it, it works, and she gets a timely reimbursement.”

Dingell, who co-chairs the Medicare for All Caucus with Jayapal, argued that newly empowered Democrats don’t need to choose between going big or going small on health care this year; they can pursue multiple tracks simultaneously.

“We are the last industrialized nation in the world that does not have health care for every one of its citizens. … We’re paying a ridiculous amount of money in paper work. Doctors can’t pay attention to their patients because they are bogged down in bureaucracy. … The time is here,” said Dingell, who’s vowed to carry the torch of her late husband, former House Energy and Commerce Committee Chairman John DingellJohn DingellCOVID-19 bill limiting liability would strike the wrong balance Michigan Rep. Debbie Dingell easily wins House primary Great American Outdoors Act will deliver critical investments to our national parks, forests MORE (D-Mich.), an early advocate of a single-payer system.

“We need to make sure anyone with pre-existing conditions has access to health care. And we got to do something about prescription drugs,” she added. “But we need to work on Medicare for all too. It’s not either or; it’s all of this. If you don’t have a vision, you don’t know what you’re working for, and you’re never going to get it done.”

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOn The Money: Pelosi, Mnuchin talk but make no progress on ending stalemate | Trump grabs 'third rail' of politics with payroll tax pause | Trump uses racist tropes to pitch fair housing repeal to 'suburban housewife' Bass on filling Harris's Senate spot: 'I'll keep all my options open' Win by QAnon believer creates new headaches for House GOP MORE (D-Calif.) has said repeatedly that, as an activist many years ago, she had fought for a single-payer approach to health coverage and would support that strategy if Congress were building a health care system from scratch today. But Pelosi also ushered ObamaCare through the lower chamber in 2009 and 2010, and she’s since focused her energy touting the benefits of the law she championed.

ObamaCare has grown steadily more popular since its passage, particularly in the face of Trump’s efforts to repeal it, and Democrats were the big winner of the health care debate in the 2018 midterms. With that in mind — and the ObamaCare framework in place — Democratic leaders appear willing to tolerate the Medicare for all debate, while keeping laser-focused on efforts to bolster the Affordable Care Act.

Pelosi is supporting the first-ever hearings for the Medicare for all plan, but they will be held in the Budget and the House Rules committees, not the main panels of jurisdiction. That suggests the bill likely won’t reach the floor during this session of Congress.

Rep. Hakeem JeffriesHakeem Sekou JeffriesJeffries on Senate coronavirus bill: 'Totally irrelevant' Gohmert tests positive for COVID-19 The Hill's Morning Report - Presented by Facebook - Brawls on Capitol Hill on Barr and COVID-19 MORE (N.Y.), the Democratic Caucus chairman, declined to take a position on single-payer on Tuesday, but said he supports having a “comprehensive” examination of how best to ensure “universal access to high-quality affordable health care for every single American.”

“That is the principle that unites the House Democratic Caucus,” Jeffries said.

“We have been clear, as part of our For the People agenda, that the starting point should be working to lower the high cost of life-saving prescription drugs.”

Mike Lillis contributed.