Nadler says Ivanka Trump, others could 'quite conceivably' become part of House probe

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold Nadler (D-N.Y.) said Monday that Ivanka TrumpIvana (Ivanka) Marie TrumpTrump again tests negative for coronavirus Trump speaks with network service providers on coronavirus response Meadows joins White House in crisis mode MORE and other associates of the president could "quite conceivably" hear from his committee, despite being left off an initial round of document requests.

"I’m not going to answer why any particular person is or isn’t on it. We think that anybody on it has information of use to the committee in establishing things," Nadler said on CNN's "OutFront."

Nadler said the 81 people and entities identified in a list released earlier in the day had previously provided information to the special counsel's office, the Southern District of New York or other officials.

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While the list included Donald Trump Jr.Donald (Don) John TrumpTwitter says coronavirus disinformation spread by Chinese officials does not violate rules Former lawyer for trophy hunting group joins Trump administration A rarely used fine could limit the spread of the coronavirus to the United States MORE, Eric TrumpEric Frederick TrumpTrump company seeking to delay some payments amid coronavirus: report Trump Jr. challenges Hunter Biden to debate him over who has benefited most off their fathers' time in office Warren makes surprise appearance on 'Saturday Night Live' after dropping out of 2020 race MORE and Jared KushnerJared Corey KushnerCongress needs to step up fast to protect abused children Kushner makes first appearance at coronavirus briefing Trump leans on businesses in coronavirus response MORE, it did not include the president's daughter and senior adviser.

"She’s not on the initial list. That’s all we can say," Nadler said.

He added that there are going to be more document requests and that "there may or may not be more people."

Asked if Ivanka Trump could be added to the list in the future, Nadler said, "quite conceivably."

Nadler on Monday issued the first round of document requests as part of a sweeping investigation into President TrumpDonald John TrumpMilitary personnel to handle coronavirus patients at facilities in NYC, New Orleans and Dallas Navy hospital ship USNS Comfort has total of 20 patients: report Fauci says that all states should have stay-at-home orders MORE's campaign, business and administration. The investigation will focus on three key areas, Nadler said: obstruction of justice, public corruption and abuses of power.

Trump, who over the weekend railed against Democratic oversight efforts, said Monday that he cooperates "all the time with everybody," when asked if he would comply with Nadler's requests. He went on to decry the investigation as a "hoax."

Nadler defended his committee's actions, arguing it's part of the panel's constitutional duty to conduct oversight. 

"We’re simply exercising our oversight jurisdiction, and he doesn’t understand it, or he’s not willing to concede to Congress that we have an oversight jurisdiction," Nadler said. 

He reiterated that he believes Congress is still "far from" impeachment proceedings. Nadler would oversee such proceedings as chairman of the Judiciary Committee.