House Dems delay vote on resolution rebuking Omar over Israel remarks

House Dems delay vote on resolution rebuking Omar over Israel remarks
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House Democratic leaders are delaying a vote on a resolution condemning anti-Semitism that had been slated to take place on Wednesday, according to a Democratic aide.

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiNRCC turns up heat on vulnerable Democrats over Omar's call to abolish police Shocking job numbers raise hopes for quicker recovery Engel primary challenger hits million in donations MORE (D-Calif.) and Majority Leader Steny HoyerSteny Hamilton HoyerPelosi: Democrats to unveil sweeping criminal justice proposal Monday Calls for police reform sparks divisions in Congress Hoyer wins Maryland House primary MORE (D-Md.) announced in a closed-door leadership meeting that a vote on the resolution is more likely to occur Thursday instead of the initially expected Wednesday, the aide confirmed to The Hill on Tuesday. They also said that the resolution would be updated to include a nod to anti-Muslim bias. 
 
House Majority Whip James Clyburn (D-S.C.) told reporters that the resolution should emphasize an “anti-hate” message. 

 

Clyburn told Fox News Tuesday evening they were “still drafting” the resolution, but feels it should be "anti-hate." The measure is expected to be updated to include language condemning anti-Muslim bias.

The resolution comes in the wake of Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarNRCC turns up heat on vulnerable Democrats over Omar's call to abolish police Top progressive lawmaker unveils bill requiring national police training standards Pelosi demands Trump clarify deployment of unidentified law enforcement in DC MORE's (D-Minn.) most recent controversial comments on Israel.

"I want to talk about the political influence in this country that says it is OK for people to push for allegiance to a foreign country,” she said during a forum at a bookstore last week.

Her remarks sparked strong backlash from members on both sides of the aisle, who argued her comments were anti-Semitic.

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An initial draft of the resolution does not name Omar specifically, but does condemn "accusations of dual loyalty generally have an insidious, bigoted history" and "acknowledges the dangerous consequences of perpetuating anti-Semitic stereotypes."

Top Republicans have called on Democrats to take a harder line on the issue, arguing the text of resolution should specifically reprimand Omar.

"I'm hearing that they are even going to pull back on their resolution that didn't even mention her - that they are afraid they can't even pass that," House Minority Leader Kevin McCarthyKevin Owen McCarthyThe Hill's Morning Report - DC preps for massive Saturday protest; Murkowski breaks with Trump The Hill's Morning Report - Floyd eulogies begin; Trump-Esper conflict emerges The Hill's Morning Report - Protesters' defiance met with calls to listen MORE (R-Calif.) told reporters Tuesday. "That's what I was just told on the floor, which to me is very concerning."

Rep. Lee ZeldinLee ZeldinFlynn urged Russian diplomat to have 'reciprocal' response to Obama sanctions, new transcripts show The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Surgeon General stresses need to invest much more in public health infrastructure, during and after COVID-19; Fauci hopeful vaccine could be deployed in December The Hill's Coronavirus Report: Mnuchin sees 'strong likelihood' of another relief package; Warner says some businesses 'may not come back' at The Hill's Advancing America's Economy summit MORE (R-N.Y.), who has previously sparred with Omar on Twitter over comments she made in the past, said Democrats should work across the aisle on the resolution. 

"It would be good for them to bring to make this a bipartisan effort, work with Republicans and that would send a very strong message that an issue like this should transcend politics," he told The Hill. "The entire chamber united in January passing a resolution about white supremacy and it was determined Steve KingSteven (Steve) Arnold KingGOP lawmakers say Steve King's loss could help them in November The Hill's Campaign Report: Biden on the cusp of formally grasping the Democratic nomination The Hill's 12:30 Report: Sights and sounds from the protests MORE couldn't serve on the Small Business Committee anymore. We should go to the House floor just like we all stand united."

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Zeldin noted it's not the first time the House has felt the need to condemn anti-Semitism in response to comments made by Omar, adding he believes Democratic leadership needs to remove her from her committee assignment. 

"I don't believe that she should have been appointed to the Foreign Affairs Committee in the first place and that even if she's not removed she's going to get herself kicked off that committee sooner rather than later," he continued. 

While her comments were met with bipartisan pushback, a number of progressive lawmakers have come to Omar's defense.

"One of the things that is hurtful about the extent to which reprimand is sought of Ilhan is that no one seeks this level of reprimand when members make statements about Latinx + other communities (during the shutdown, a GOP member yelled “Go back to Puerto Rico!” on the floor)," Rep. Alexandria Ocasio-CortezAlexandria Ocasio-CortezNRCC turns up heat on vulnerable Democrats over Omar's call to abolish police Overnight Energy: US Park Police say 'tear gas' statements were 'mistake' | Trump to reopen area off New England coast for fishing | Vulnerable Republicans embrace green issues Engel primary challenger hits million in donations MORE (D-N.Y.) tweeted.

 
Omar did not respond to reporters' questions on Tuesday evening.