First Native American Congresswoman presides over House

First Native American Congresswoman presides over House
© Deb Haaland Campaign

Rep. Deb Haaland (D-N.M.) became the first Native American woman to sit in the House Speaker's chair as she presided over a floor debate on a voting rights and campaign finance bill. 

"You can watch the 1st time a Native American woman has sat in the Speaker's chair," Haaland tweeted. 

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"Congresswoman Haaland will preside over the House Floor during debate of the For the People Act, transformative legislation that seeks to end corruption in politics and ensure fair access to the ballot box," said a statement from Haaland's office. 

"Haaland is a long-time organizer who has worked to increase access to the ballot box in New Mexico and particularly in Indian Country and rural areas for nearly twenty years," the statement said. 

Haaland was also one of the first two Native American women elected to Congress. She and Rep. Sharice DavidsSharice DavidsLawmakers urge young women to run for office at DC conference Ex-congressman launching PAC to defend Dem seats in 2020 Freshman Democrats call on McConnell to hold vote on election reform bill MORE (D-Kan.) were elected in 2018 and became the first Native American congresswomen in January.

Davids celebrated Haaland's achievement with a tweet.

"Watching my friend, @RepDebHaaland, become the first Native American woman to sit in the Speaker’s chair and preside over the House Floor. #RepresentationMatters," she wrote.

Updated at 4:03 p.m.