Pelosi says impeaching Trump 'just not worth it'

Speaker Nancy PelosiNancy PelosiOvernight Defense: GAO finds administration broke law by withholding Ukraine aid | Senate opens Trump trial | Pentagon to resume training Saudi students soon Hillicon Valley: FBI to now notify state officials of cyber breaches | Pelosi rips 'shameful' Facebook | 5G group beefs up lobby team | Spotify unveils playlists for pets Hill.TV's Saagar Enjeti on impeachment: 'CNN can see through this nonsense' MORE (D-Calif.) made her strongest comments to date on impeachment, saying in a new interview that President TrumpDonald John TrumpLev Parnas implicates Rick Perry, says Giuliani had him pressure Ukraine to announce Biden probe Saudi Arabia paid 0 million for cost of US troops in area Parnas claims ex-Trump attorney visited him in jail, asked him to sacrifice himself for president MORE is “just not worth it,” unless there’s bipartisan support for going down that road.

"Impeachment is so divisive to the country that unless there’s something so compelling and overwhelming and bipartisan, I don’t think we should go down that path, because it divides the country,” Pelosi said in a Washington Post interview published Monday. “And he’s just not worth it."

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Pelosi told the newspaper last week that despite her opposition to impeachment, she does not believe Trump is fit to serve as president.

"Are we talking ethically? Intellectually? Politically? What are we talking here?" she said. "All of the above. No. No. I don’t think he is."

The Speaker elaborated on her comments later Monday afternoon in remarks to reporters comparing the Trump impeachment push to the one that followed former President George W. Bush's invasion of Iraq.

The California Democrat has set a very high bar for impeachment proceedings, even as the more progressive wing of her caucus clamors to remove Trump from office.

Impeachment has split the caucus since Democrats took control of the House in January, and the topic has gained steam in recent weeks following explosive testimony from Trump’s former lawyer, Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTreasury adviser pleads guilty to making unauthorized disclosures in case involving Manafort Michael Cohen calls for early release from prison The rise of Alexandria Ocasio-Cortez in 2019 MORE.

Rep. Brad ShermanBradley (Brad) James ShermanTrump-Pelosi trade deal creates strife among progressives The Hill's 12:30 Report — Presented by UANI — GOP, Democrats square off at final impeachment hearing Live coverage: Democrats, Republicans seek to win PR battle in final House impeachment hearing MORE (D-Calif.) re-introduced articles of impeachment on the first day of the new Congress in January, alleging that Trump had obstructed justice by firing then-FBI Director James ComeyJames Brien ComeyNYT: Justice investigating alleged Comey leak of years-old classified info Bernie-Hillary echoes seen in Biden-Sanders primary fight Rosenstein on his time in Trump administration: 'We got all the big issues right' MORE.

Freshman Rep. Rashida TlaibRashida Harbi TlaibAyanna Pressley's 'squad' of congresswomen offers support after she opens up about alopecia With surge in anti-Semitism, political leaders need to be aggressive and reflective in response Congressional Progressive Caucus co-chair endorses Sanders MORE (D-Mich.) -- who drew national attention on her first day in office by pledging to “impeach the motherf---er” -- said last week she will introduce a measure by the end of the month to oust the president.

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In an interview with Showtime’s “The Circus” that aired Sunday, interviewer Alex Wagner remarked to Tlaib that “it doesn't feel like you think he's any less of a motherf---er today than two months ago.”

“That’s right,” Tlaib replied, smiling.

A third Democrat, Rep. Al GreenAlexander (Al) N. GreenThe Memo: Will Iran crisis sideline impeachment process? Green says House shouldn't hold impeachment articles indefinitely GOP set to make life difficult for Democrats on impeachment MORE (Texas), has pledged to force another House floor impeachment vote. He forced two procedural votes on impeachment during the 115th Congress when Republicans were in the majority, but neither effort was successful.

Green is scheduled to discuss his next steps on impeachment in an interview with C-SPAN’s “Washington Journal” on Tuesday morning.

Sherman told reporters on Monday that he didn't interpret Pelosi's new comments as a change from what she's said in the past. "I mean, I know she said, 'I'm going to make news,' but I don't think she said anything that was surprising news," Sherman said.
 
He acknowledged that public support isn't widespread enough to begin impeachment proceedings, especially since the findings of Mueller's investigation are unknown. But Sherman argued that simply talking about impeachment is a tool in itself.
 
"If we hadn't talked about impeachment, God knows what he would have done," Sherman said, referring to the president. "He has to think about impeachment a little bit, and I'm sure that there are 20 truly ugly things that crossed his mind that he didn't do precisely because we talked about it."

Outside of Congress, liberals agitating for Trump’s impeachment, like billionaire activist Tom Steyer, quickly began pushing back on Pelosi's latest remarks.

Steyer’s group, Need to Impeach, has aired television ads and held town halls to pressure Democratic lawmakers on impeachment.

"Speaker Pelosi thinks ‘he’s just not worth it?’ Well, is defending our legal system ‘worth it?’ Is holding the President accountable for his crimes and cover-ups ‘worth it?’ Is doing what’s right ‘worth it?’ Or shall America just stop fighting for our principles and do what's politically convenient?" Steyer said in a statement on Monday.

Democratic leaders on Capitol Hill have largely sought to tamp down the issue, arguing that lawmakers should take a wait-and-see approach as special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerSchiff: Trump acquittal in Senate trial would not signal a 'failure' Jeffries blasts Trump for attack on Thunberg at impeachment hearing Live coverage: House Judiciary to vote on impeachment after surprise delay MORE and congressional committees conduct their investigations.

Pelosi has long downplayed talk of impeachment, saying it would be a “gift” to Republicans. She has maintained a consistent view on the subject since reclaiming the Speaker’s gavel, arguing it would have to be clear-cut and bipartisan.

“If there's to be grounds for impeachment of President Trump — and I'm not seeking those grounds — that would have to be so clearly bipartisan in terms of acceptance of it before I think we should go down any impeachment path,” Pelosi told USA Today in an interview published on the first day of the new Congress.

And in an interview around the same time with NBC’s “Today,” Pelosi stressed that “we have to wait and see what happens with the Mueller report.”

“We shouldn’t be impeaching for a political reason,” she added.

Cohen’s hearing late last month before the House Oversight Committee, in which he said Trump was directly engaged in bank fraud and involved in a scheme to silence women who alleged they had affairs with Trump more than a decade ago, gave new momentum to impeachment proponents. Trump has denied any wrongdoing.

Rep. Carolyn MaloneyCarolyn Bosher MaloneyPelosi taps Virginia Democrat for key post on economic panel Five lingering questions as impeachment heads to Senate House Dems demand answers regarding holding of Iranian-Americans at border MORE (D-N.Y.), a member of the Oversight panel, said she felt the hearing “possibly could lead to impeachment.”

But Pelosi declined to wade into the debate, calling it a “divisive issue in our country.”

“I’m not going into that,” she told reporters the day after Cohen’s public testimony.

Instead, she and other party leaders have fixed their attention on ramping up investigations into Trump.

The House Intelligence Committee has spoken with Cohen behind closed doors in recent weeks and is scheduled to interview a Russian-American businessman at the end of the month about plans for a Trump Tower in Moscow.

Democrats on the House Judiciary Committee earlier this month launched a sprawling investigation into the president’s administration, campaign and business, sending document requests to 81 individuals and entities.

House Judiciary Committee Chairman Jerrold NadlerJerrold (Jerry) Lewis NadlerMcConnell locks in schedule for start of impeachment trial Pelosi: Trump's impeachment 'cannot be erased' House to vote Wednesday on sending articles of impeachment to Senate MORE (D-N.Y.), whose committee would oversee any impeachment proceedings, said at the time that the probe is part of congressional oversight responsibilities, adding that Congress remained "far from" impeachment.

"We are going to be the check and the balance," Nadler told CNN the same day he issued document requests. "We are going to find out, we are going to lay out the facts for the American people."

Updated at 7:59 p.m.