Omar fires back at Trump: 'You can't #MuslimBan us from Congress'

Omar fires back at Trump: 'You can't #MuslimBan us from Congress'
© Greg Nash

Rep. Ilhan OmarIlhan OmarDems seek to rein in calls for impeachment Nancy Pelosi had disastrous first 100 days as Speaker of the House The silencing of American Muslims MORE (D-Minn.) fired back at President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussia's election interference is a problem for the GOP Pence to pitch trade deal during trip to Michigan: report Iran oil minister: US made 'bad mistake' in ending sanctions waivers MORE on Sunday for retweeting an article suggesting that Minnesota Democrats are trying to remove her from Congress.

"I am sorry Mr. @realDonaldTrump. I am for real, you can’t #MuslimBan us from Congress!" Omar tweeted, apparently referencing the Outkast song "Ms. Jackson."

The article Trump retweeted referenced a report from The Hill that said some Minnesota Democrats are taking initial steps to recruit a candidate to run against Omar in next year’s primary election.

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Those lawmakers are reportedly angered by comments from Omar that some have deemed anti-Semitic.

Omar sparked backlash for suggesting that politicians who support Israel do so for financial reasons and that lobbyists are pushing for “allegiance to a foreign country.” Critics say those comments rely on anti-Semitic tropes.

Omar has apologized for the comments but maintained that criticizing the U.S.'s relationship with Israel is not anti-Semitic.

In her tweet Sunday, Omar was referring to Trump's travel ban preventing nationals from five Muslim-majority countries from entering the United States.

When Trump first introduced the policy just a few days into his term, the ban was immediately challenged in court for being targeted at Muslims. The most recent version, which was limited in scope compared to the original, was upheld by the Supreme Court last year.

Trump's retweet of the article about Omar comes as he has been criticized for not sufficiently condemning anti-Muslim bias following last week's deadly shootings at two mosques in New Zealand.