Roger Stone invokes Fifth Amendment in House Judiciary document request

Roger StoneRoger Jason StoneA tale of two lies: Stone, McCabe and the danger of a double standard for justice Judge in Roger Stone case orders Tuesday phone hearing Klobuchar calls on Barr to testify in front of Senate after department rejects recommended Roger Stone sentencing MORE is declining to cooperate with the House Judiciary Committee’s request for documents in its investigation into President TrumpDonald John TrumpRussian sanctions will boomerang States, cities rethink tax incentives after Amazon HQ2 backlash A Presidents Day perspective on the nature of a free press MORE's administration, business and campaign, citing his Fifth Amendment rights.

In a letter sent to the committee on Monday and obtained by The Hill, Stone’s attorney wrote that his client won’t produce the requested documents “on the advice of counsel.”

The committee had requested that Stone provide any documents tied to hush money payments made by then-Trump attorney Michael CohenMichael Dean CohenTrump calls the Russia investigation 'bulls---' CNN's Axelrod says impeachment didn't come up until 80 minutes into focus group The Hill's 12:30 Report: Democrats turn to obstruction charge MORE to women alleging affairs with Trump ahead of the 2016 election.

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They also requested documents related to any offers from foreign or domestic governments to the president or his businesses, contacts with WikiLeaks and any communications involving the Russian government and Trump.

The House Judiciary Committee, Stone and his attorney, Grant Smith, did not immediately respond to requests for comment.

In the letter, Smith cited Stone’s indictment on charges brought by special counsel Robert MuellerRobert (Bob) Swan MuellerCNN's Toobin warns McCabe is in 'perilous condition' with emboldened Trump CNN anchor rips Trump over Stone while evoking Clinton-Lynch tarmac meeting The Hill's 12:30 Report: New Hampshire fallout MORE as reason to not comply with the request.

“As a current criminal defendant, with the presumption of innocence guaranteed to him, it is not in Mr. Stone’s best interest to participate in any additional proceedings, outside those in federal court, until the charges are resolved,” Smith wrote. “Neither will Mr. Stone confirm for your Committee the existence of, or produce any documents requested, for the purpose of being used against him in anyway or to further the political agenda of people who want nothing more than to avenge the loss of their chosen candidate for president in 2016 by deposing the legally elected office holder."

Smith also characterized the committee’s request for documents as a “fishing expedition.”

“I hardly need to say that the gossip and innuendo which surrounds Mr. Stone in the press and in the Congress, and the pending criminal matter, provides him with a reasonable basis to protect himself from the ‘ambiguous circumstances’ which some have embraced,” the letter states.

Stone was indicted earlier this year on charges stemming from Mueller's probe, including making false statements to Congress, interfering with a congressional investigation and witness tampering.

He has denied the charges, and is scheduled to go on trial in November.

Many of Stone's charges are tied to his 2017 testimony before the House Intelligence Committee, during which he said he had a back channel to WikiLeaks ahead of the 2016 election.

Stone made statements appearing to predict that WikiLeaks would release damaging Democratic emails ahead of the 2016 election, shortly before the group did so.

WikiLeaks released a trove of emails stolen from the Democratic National Committee (DNC) and Clinton campaign chairman John Podesta. Mueller later indicted 12 Russian military officers in the DNC hack.

Stone has said he did not have direct prior knowledge of the email dumps, but that a source tipped him off that the organization would release damaging information in the lead-up to the election.

Cohen, the president's former attorney, testified last month before Congress that Stone told Trump that WikiLeaks was planning to release the emails. Both Stone and Trump have denied the allegation.