Meadows: 'The clock has finally struck midnight on the Russian collusion fantasy'

House Freedom Caucus Chairman Mark Meadows (R-N.C.) said Sunday that the "clock has finally struck midnight on the 'Russian collusion' fantasy."

"After 22 months of a special counsel and 2 years of congressional investigations, it’s over. The clock has finally struck midnight on the ‘Russian collusion’ fantasy. No collusion," he wrote on Twitter, referring to allegations of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia in the 2016 election.

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Meadows's remark comes in response to Attorney General William Barr saying in a letter to Congress that special counsel Robert Mueller did not find evidence of collusion between the Trump campaign and Russia.

Mueller, who investigated Russian interference in the election and possible obstruction of justice on the part of Trump, on Friday submitted his final report to Barr. 

Barr shared a summary of Mueller's main findings in a letter to Congress on Sunday. In the letter, Barr wrote that the special counsel probe "did not find that the Trump campaign or anyone associated with it conspired or coordinated with Russia in its efforts to influence the 2016 U.S. presidential election."

On the issue of obstruction, Barr said in the letter that Mueller did not determine whether Trump committed a crime.

“The Special Counsel states that ‘while this report does not conclude that the President committed a crime, it also does not exonerate him,’ ” Barr wrote. 

Meadows later expanded his statement to call for an investigation into why the probe was opened in the first place.

"But today’s verdict should send a message well beyond the fact that there was no collusion. What the public needs to understand: there never was any evidence of collusion to begin with. This wasn’t an investigation of a probable crime. It was an unwarranted investigation of a person—President TrumpDonald John TrumpForget the spin: Five unrefuted Mueller Report revelations Lara Trump: Merkel admitting migrants 'one of the worst things that ever happened to Germany' Financial satisfaction hits record high: survey MORE," he wrote.

"In the interest of transparency, we can expect Americans will be able to see more details on the report in the coming days. But make no mistake: transparency should not stop there. The public deserves to see the interviews, documents, and intelligence that “justified” this investigation in the first place—the release of which several of my colleagues and I have been advocating for for over a year."